Shortage of Goods In the Latter Soviet Years

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

Товарный дефицит в СССР: как это было

5 thoughts on “Shortage of Goods In the Latter Soviet Years”

  1. The United States could learn from this. In the US there would have been riots and shootings. My recollection of the times is that, in the (former) Soviet Union, the vast majority of people accepted that they had to had to wait their turn and that everyone has a social responsibility to behave peacefully and show respect for their fellow citizens. It is sad that these conditions were brought about by a corrupt and incompetent government.

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  2. Kind of reminds me of the shelves in some of the supermarkets in the last few weeks
    here in America, with people buying up all the hand sanitizer, wet wipes, toilet paper
    and what not.

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  3. When I think back – the CCCP fell after a series of bad harvests leading to food shortages and a lack of foreign currency, caused by endless foreign wars and expensive oil. So the CCCP did not have the reserves to import sufficient quantities of food. That was before Russia discovered oil in the north and started to export oil and gas. In addition, the Chernobyl accident ruined vast farm lands in Ukraine and Belarus. People went seriously hungry and at one point, West Berlin donated its whole 3 month stockpile of food to Moscow.

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  4. No one in their right mind should think that this is any different in any advanced capitalistic neoliberal society today. It is not. While stocks are there any everything is full, around 20% of Europeans can not afford to buy healthy food . The rate is higher, rarely lower, in a large selection of countries… and the difference between the rich and poor is systematically much higher today than it was yesterday.

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