Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

Due to the tendency of standartized construction that was popular in the USSR, districts in Soviet cities looked like twins. However, there were rare exceptions. For example, panel houses connected with bridges in Tbilisi – the capital of Georgia. Guests of the city make assumptions what it was done for. But when they stay in Tbilisi a little longer, they begin to understand the point and to happily use the bridges. Because it’s convenient.

Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

The houses with bridges are located in a big dwelling district of the city – Nutsubidze Plateau. The structures stand on benches of a slope. It’s hard to move along the street with such relief. That is why people required a non-standard but effective solution.

Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

It was found by architect Otar Kalandarishvili who created the project of multi-storeyed “twin-towers” with walking bridges. The solution allows passers-by to move between Nutsubidze Platea and neighboring districts in a simple way – without tiresome climbing up or descending down the slope.

Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

It seems that people going through the houses must make their residents nervous. But Kalandarishvili envisaged everything. The panel houses have two elevators – for residents and for those who use the bridges. The second one lifts people up on the 14th floor only where bridges are located.

Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia

To use the elevator one should pay 14 Georgian copecks. People willingly pay and use the bridges.

7 thoughts on “Strange Bridges Connecting Houses In Tbilisi, Georgia”

  1. Hong Kong public estates also had this design but find a bridge connected 2 towers
    at about over 20 floors located at Tsuen Wan at Hong Kong. This is Nina Tower…

    https://goo.gl/maps/vxMc5m55NLD2bBV36

    Some of the Hong Kong public estates also have bridges to connect two districts in
    between the hill and lower levels. Top part level of this bridge is located at at least
    floor 11 as counting the number of stairs shown from the outlook of the tower…

    https://goo.gl/maps/Tv754Q9ZN6GYnB4E8

    This bridge connects the new district at Anderson Road and the old district of Shun
    Lei and Shun Tin…

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  2. Usually such housing projects are erected on a horizontally perfect plain. But in hilly (even mountainous) Georgia, where flat expanses are in short supply, they found an interesting solution to the problems that arise in such an environment. Not bad! But I wish they had invested more in better designs and had used better materials. These prefab concrete towers look rotten and I don’t think they looked much better when they were new. But this is how things were in the USSR after 1953. Cost-cutting was all the rage and in this case the cheapskate planners couldn’t even be arsed to provide the bridges with proper roofing. What parents would let their kids use these bridges with peace of mind? I wouldn’t.

    Compare this with the USSR’s first building boom that began in the late 1920s and was brought to a halt by the nazi invasion. Compare the super luxurious flats and apartment buildings in Leningrad and in Moscow, intended for the working class but today owned and inhabited by millionaires. Or compare the enormous investments that went into public infrastructure, public transport systems, the Leningrad and Moscow Metro, the Seven Sisters etc. etc. All of this was over, once Khrushchev, Brezhnev & Co were in charge.

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      • That’s true. Humans are adaptable animals and they often involuntarily put up with conditions that other humans impose upon them. But this was not supposed to happen in the U.S.S.R. … after all, they had a revolution that was aiming to improve the human condition.

        Reply
  3. There are no copecks in Georgia. Just laris and tetris. Copecks are used only in the regions of Georgia occupied by Russia (Abkhazia and South Ossetia)…

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  4. This is also common in Haifa, Israel.

    Those buildings in Tbilisi sure can do with a lick of paint. In Poland, Slovakia, Czechia and Hungary, many of these buildings are restored, insulated and painted and are quite nice then.

    Reply

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