Colorized Photos of the Russian Village 1899

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Russian village in the XIX century was about hard labor. “Those that don’t work, don’t work”, as they say. These photos were made by an enthnographer Mikhail Krukovsky in 1899. Modern technologies allowed to make them colorized. Now we can see how a typical Russian village looked like so many years ago.

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

Фотографии русских деревень конца XIX века в цвете

7 thoughts on “Colorized Photos of the Russian Village 1899”

  1. Arraigned marriages were demanded of teenagers. This hopefully prevented promiscuous boys from getting into trouble in these small villages.

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  2. Whether b+w or colorized … interesting pictures, all of them!

    But I found the “windmill” particularly intriguing. Have a look at those blades, they must weigh a ton! Imagine the load this puts on the bearings. Hard to believe the thing works at all below tornado speeds of wind. But then again, maybe I’m all wrong. Maybe this isn’t a windmill, but a very luxurious barn with a different door for each day. Who knows what these clever Russians come up with when they have enough time and material …

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  3. I have looked at a similar wind mill – or what was left of it. The blades were very thin strips of wood. The power those things could generate was not much – around 1 to 2 horse power. Two or three people would start those old machines by hand and levers, to overcome static friction and then the wind/water/donkey would keep it going for a few hours per day.

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  4. BTW, that wind mill stands on a rotating platform – something like a Lazy Susan. A couple people could rotate it with long levers to turn it in/out of the wind. If you look more closely, you will see some of the mechanism at the bottom. Most of the power is generated by the top blade, when it gets to the bottom, there is not much wind – just turbulence.

    Fancy mills had a secondary set of blades pulleys and gears to rotate it with wind power – looking like the tail of a helicopter.

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    • Interesting, thanks.

      There goes my theory about a barn with a different door for each day of the week. Well, it was far-fetched any way… 🙂

      Reply

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