The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Pictures taken by ordinary citizens instead of journalists showed more truth than popular Soviet newspaper “Pravda” (“The Truth”). This is how the Soviet trade really looked like – empty shelves, long lines and angry people.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Grocery in 1959 – poverty and hopelessness.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line for apples in 1965.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Grocery store in 1972. Illusion of abundance: two or three kinds of canned food and a bottle with dark liquid – oil or alcohol.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

“Selpo” – this word was used for a village grocery store.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line for sausage. 1980. There were two types of sausage then at most.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Sellers could simply shut this small window and leave the crowd with no food.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

“Show your documents”.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line for alcohol, early 80s.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Glass bottle buy-back center.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Sale of alcohol

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Someone simply was too tired to wait his turn..

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Beer booth

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Beer store customers

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Some people even fought for beer

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Soviet feminism

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Soviet fast-food

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

First days following the opening of the McDonalds on Pushkin Square in Moscow. The event attracted 30 thousand people.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Soviet sellers were perfect in merchandising: they could place two kinds of canned food the way to make an illusion of abundance.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

1987. Empty shelves in the store.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

No pioneer uniforms available…

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Empty shelves and new taxes of 1990.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

People used to fight not only standing in line for alcohol, but for all other products too.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

What would a modern hipster choose back in the early 90s?

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Department store and sports clothes.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Exhibitions saw crowds of people too. 1986.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

A line at the Armory on Borovitskaya street (Kremlin).

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line for … cucumbers in 1979. They were in short supply in early summer back then.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Questinable port wine in cisterns… But people willingly drank it.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Standing in line for vodka.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line for water in Orel, 1991.

The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists

Line in a toy store of Moscow, 1990.

11 thoughts on “The Real Situation In Soviet Shops Exposed By Citizens, Not Journalists”

  1. looks like Cuba or Venezuela, but still lots of fat people, where did they get their calories? And I like that kinda feminism where wahmen do actual work rather than the misandrist milennial feminism wherein they want to kill men and replace them.

  2. The horror of this is that Communism is every day becoming more popular; especially among the young and stupid in the “western democracies”.
    Look at how it is here in the USA: Bernie Sanders almost became President of the USA?
    How stupid do you have to be to vote for “socialism”. But obviously a lot of people are that stupid.

  3. Socialism, when PROPERLY IMPLEMENTED, (like in Sweden) is bound to be the future of mankind. There is always avoiding past mistakes and learning from them

  4. William,

    I love my city and my former mayor. Maybe, you should check out Burlington to see what Sander’s leadership helped bring about.

    Despite the cold weather, I’d much rather live here in Vermont than in a place like Mississippi. Our businesses are thriving and my neighbors are wonderful. I love my little city and I have no intention on trading it in for some corporate run city set up to make profits for investors.

    Mississippi, Louisiana, New Mexico, West Virginia, Kentucky, Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia lead the US in poverty. It seems their policies will get us much closer to photos like this than those the policies of those like Sanders who actually cares about Americans, not just corporations.

  5. In the Soviet times due to the government control even a simple things such as lipstick and makeup were often in very short supply. In the USA you can buy a new car in a few hours…..in Soviet Russia it often took 6 months or more to buy a new car. Of course if you were a commissar you could obtain a new car very fast.

  6. I’m American -worked for Pan Am. Went to Moscow in 1967 to see the all powerful “enemy” up close. Space Gap – Education Gap – Military Gap was all we heard at home. We were being left behind and would buried! What I saw was one of the most powerful shocks of my life still to this day. These people lived like third world peasants! Long lines everywhere -virtually empty stores – vast empty streets -pathetically bad engineering and construction – old ladies using shovels to dig ditches. And, people I got to know told me (confidentially) that Moscow got the “Best of Everything” If I could go into the countryside, I would see some REAL poverty. I wanted to get a watch with Cyrillic characters for a souvenir. Went to the GUM store -they had only two kinds of watch for sale (both obviously cheaply made) Watchbands were in another department and they were out of stock. (You could go into any corner drugstore in the US and choose from 20 different watches) The wealth of the USSR was being wasted on military and “show” and US taxpayers were being robbed by the military/industrial complex (Eisenhower warned us) by using the “advanced” Soviets as the Boogeyman. A truly great learning experience.

  7. stan…sweden is a capitalist economy that taxes the crap out of their citizens. Additionally, a country that would fall rather quickly if every invaded.

  8. How do you know? I actually went to Russia and liked it more than USA, I’m from Costa Rica, when I went to the us you treated me like if I was garbage and food offered in the surroundings in NY was mostly hamburgers, I Russia I could buy caviar in the same way in the street, the offering of things is better, in Moscow they treated me nice by showing me the very first Landers that took pictures from other planets, in Miami you showed me only second, in Russia I saw nice cities, in USA I only saw places like North Korea, no big marble statues holding entrances or buildings with gold roofs, in Russia they treated me with metro stations, in the us they made me ride the sewer systems adapted for transportation, I couldn’t believe it, even Peru and Mexico treated me with nice food and cool countries and pretty cities, Russia doesn’t have much poor, in fact is like 1 % less, in the us I saw people eating yellow cheese, that’s something I don’t eat in Costa Rica nor Russian friends eat it in Moscow

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