900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Blogger Sergey Dolya had a flight from Arkhangelsk-Varandey at the height of 900 km over the Russian north, along the shore of the Arctic Ocean. He shares his photos of wonderful intricate patterns he saw from the window of An-24 airplane.

900 km Over the Russian North

That very An-24.

900 km Over the Russian North

Technician drained some liquid…

900 km Over the Russian North

And then he poured it in the bucket. What has it been?

900 km Over the Russian North

It is already cold in Arkhangelsk, but not snowy.

900 km Over the Russian North

Soyana settlement.

900 km Over the Russian North

The Mezen river flows into the Arctic Ocean.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Kamenka settlement.

900 km Over the Russian North

The first snow is seen below.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Pesha river.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Snow border.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Big light river (Bolshaya Sveltlaya river).

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Pechora river. Big Ball (Bolshoi Shar) creek.

900 km Over the Russian North

Lovetsky island.

900 km Over the Russian North

Bolvansky bay.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Time to land.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Runway is made from metal plates.

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

900 km Over the Russian North

Luggage is given out.

900 km Over the Russian North

Airport of Varandey.

900 km Over the Russian North

Taxi is waiting.

900 km Over the Russian North

Get in!

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11 thoughts on “900 km Over the Russian North”

  1. Very nice blog, thanks for sharing. EnglishRussia must make an ebook of its site and then offer it. This might perhaps interest some.

  2. The technician was draining fuel from the lowest point in the system. If there is any condensation (water) in the fuel, it will come to this point. The technician can see the water in the clear jar, and drain until it is all gone. He pours the inspected fuel into the bucket, so that it doesn’t damage the tarmac, or create some other hazard.

  3. AFAIK the draining of the liquid is a check that there isn’t any water in the fuel tank. (Water could get in as condensation, etc.) The fuel will float on top of water, so if there is any water, it will be at the bottom of the fuel tank. You drain a little bit of liquid from there, and if that’s fuel, not water, then you’re good to go. Or at least that’s what I think it is. I’m not 100% certain and I’m partly guessing this. Maybe someone else can refute or confirm.

  4. Yes, 900km would be in a medium earth orbit. I think he meant 900m. The technician is draining the water out of the fuel tank, or at least checking to see if there is any, so that the engines don’t suck up any ice. Kinda ruin your day if the engines quit, even if it was only 900m and not 900km to fall!

  5. The reason why unclemymy and I and geezer made identical comments is because at the time I penned mine, unclemymy’s wasn’t publicly visible yet (i.e. wasn’t mod-approved yet), and I’m pretty sure it’s the same with geezer. Now this looks a bit daft what with us all saying the same thing, but I’m not sure how to avoid this kind of stuff.

  6. fluid drained is fuel – checking for water contamination -if water mixes with fuel = disaster – engine stop.
    Fuel and water do not mix so separate in glass jar. If all fuel in jar tank is safe.

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