Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

During Soviet Era there were a lot of collective farms. Most of Russian state food input at that time was coming from them. Some of them were very successful and large and were called “millionaires”. Like  for example this collective farm which according to Soviets statistics and memories of the locals was one of the most important and successful in the region. It produced tons of grain and meat, veggies, milk and everything else farm can get in this climes. Now it is all abandoned and destroyed. Please take a look.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Thanks to Russian blogger Celeste who travelled there we can see what it looks like now.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

There is a small village near the once large farm.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Some wooden houses here are over hundred years old.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Beside the village there are abandoned collective farm buildings.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

These fields once were full of crops.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

And now nothing useful grows here.

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms

Hope you liked it and thanks to Celeste for the photos!

via

10 thoughts on “Russian Abandoned Soviet Collective Farms”

  1. A pity, people still need work and still need to eat. Great photos, but you can’t help wondering who owns this and why can’t a programme start to help unemployed people work the land for profit, selling the harvested goods and buying themselves some pride and dignity

    • to late now all is ruined and rusted away, but yes it seems a shame. where does all Russia food come from now? are there shortages as i assume there were in soviet times?

  2. Hard to answer as an American, as the ability to farm land for profit has vanished from the hands of most individuals. I think there would be happy for the unemployed to work there, but the profit would go to someone else. It’s our future, I’m afraid.

  3. I think a part of the problem is that the soviet times stripped from people the ability to make a living out of something they can do. In cities the situations seems to be better, but it is worse in the countryside. Yes, they know how to farm, yes they sell this and that today at the market. But most have no idea how to run a business, how to make money – for example from farming. Many are used to that a director of the collective farm would tell them what to do. They have no idea where to get the money (successfully) to start the business (and they do need an initial investment) or they are afraid to take risks when money is involved. And also there are all these questions and decisions: what to grow to be successful, where to sell, what if it won’t be profitable, what if something else will go wrong? It is so much more straight forward “business” just to snatch some metal and to sell it at the local collection point for metal. And then by some vodka for this money – to celebrate!

    So at the end what often happened these years in the post soviet countries was: some “brave” guy would make some money by doing some shady business. Then he buys land and hires the “losers” (the ones that do not want to risk) to work for him. And possibly there are not many jobs around, so he can afford to set the work hours as long as he like (if the eye of law can’t see him) and likely for not a lot of money. There are exceptions to this, and there might be differences between the post-soviet countries. Here I am just trying to express the mentality of these people.

    One more thing to consider is that the soviet farming could be very inefficient. The farming business in general has changed in this regard. But in soviet times this was mostly due to quite a careless attitude to ones work. Think of it – for example the state owned farm never risked to go bankrupt. OK the director of the farm could be thrown into jail for waisting the state’s money (if this fact is very obvious), but the farm will stay no matter what! So what do you as the worker have to loose if you will not do your best?

    Again – the individual people can be and are different, there were many that worked hard, but here I am talking about the general attitude of the population at the end of the soviet union era.

  4. I wonder whether foreigners are allowed to come and cultivate in these abandoned farms. can foreigners own these farms for cultivation??
    I wish I had the real answer to this.

    • While living in Russia, I knew foreigners who lived there and opened farms. One of those people started a massive dairy business and also owned (or his Russia wife probably owned) thousands of acres and farmed it as well. I am unsure what the politic is like at the very moment, but 10-15 years ago there were plenty of opportunities to start farming business in Russia. I suppose it has become more difficult, but I’m unsure since I moved away in 2012.

    • By the way, I think it is extremely difficult to own land/property (if not impossible) in Russia without being Russian or being married to a Russian. So, no, I highly doubt just any foreigner can come, buy up land, and start a farm.

  5. Seems like such a shame, or a waste to just let a large collective farm go away like that. Don’t people still need food to eat? Maybe modernized but to me it just seems strange.

Leave a Comment