Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

It’s fall and in Russia its time to hunt mushrooms. Russian villagers call mushrooms “free pork” – implying that mushrooms have as much protein as meat and also tastes good if prepared correctly. The king of the Russian mushroom hunt is Beliy Grib or “White Mushroom” known as Porcini, or sometimes bolete, to the Western World. Here it is, in the pic above.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Thanks to Alexei, a Russian blogger, we can now see a mushroom hunt first-hand.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Usually porcinis grow in pine forests. So another Russian name for them is “borovik” where “bor” is a pine forest. Here is one  – can you spot it?

Russian Porcini Hunt

Alexei pulled it completely out of the ground, which is considered to be bad practice – this way you destroy the mycelium – the underground network of mushroom roots which can generate more fruit – or with time actual mushrooms, if not damaged.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Here are a couple more. The right way to get them is to use a sharp knife and..

Russian Porcini Hunt

Cut them at ground level, leaving a slice.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Alexei again got it wrong.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Alexei went on a mushroom hunt early in the morning and was lucky to find a lot of them hiding in the clean and tidy pine forest.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Sometimes, just in one spot he could get a group of five.

Russian Porcini Hunt

To find the porcinis one has to train his eyes.

Russian Porcini Hunt

You shouldn’t look straight down – it’s better to look five or ten meters ahead. This way the human eye has a better ability to spot the deli shrooms.

Russian Porcini Hunt

And this is a basket – the usual accessory for a mushroom hunt.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Sometimes it gets full.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Sometimes they grow in pairs.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Aren’t they nice?

Russian Porcini Hunt

Tell me frankly, as people of different cultures which probably never had a habit of hunting porcinis – do they look nice and edible to you?

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

This is how much he got in three and a half hours of hunting.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Sometimes the mushrooms go well with good neighbors – cowberries. Russian Porcini Hunt

Your eyes really need to be trained – can you spot a whole family of porcini mushrooms in this pic above?

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

This is Alexei second basket. It’s 1:00pm already and he has spent over six hours on the hunt and he is tired and hungry.

Russian Porcini Hunt

So he decides to move out but meets a few more on his way back that he probably overlooked in the beginning.

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

Russian Porcini Hunt

This is how many mushrooms he got in total!

So how do you find it? Interesting? Good looking? Mouthwatering? Or totally yuck?

Here is his website:

via

5 thoughts on “Russian Porcini Hunt”

  1. Russians are addicted by mushrooms.
    Once they were surprised here, why finns don’t take Porcinis?
    Amount of people in russian forests is growing.

    Reply
  2. Actually cutting the mushroom is the worst thing you can do, except for those growing on wood. What we understand as “mushroom” is only the fruit, the real organism is spread out in the soil. When you cut it off, the piece staying behind will rot and very likly prevent new mushrooms from growing, at least for a while.
    The correct way to harvest is twisting the mushroom off, so it comes almost clean off. What stays behind will grow new fruit, soon.
    Additionaly you are unable to distinguish some poisenous mushrooms from their non poisenous counterparts if you do not examine the “root”, as it is the only difference.
    After making shure the mushroom is good to eat, you cut off the end part and discard it, so the mushroom will not rot.

    Reply

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