Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Right now we are going to show some interesting pictures of Russian planes 1941-1944 taken from the Finnish archives.

On the photo above – UTI-4, Olonets, 8th September 1941, preserved till these days.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

U-2, serial number 11429. Captured in February, 19, 1939. The pucture was taken in September, 27, 1941 in Helsinki at the exhibition of trophies.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

DB-3 that made emergency landing at the power station “Svir”, 27 September, 1941.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

U-2.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Captured Soviet hangar with gliders. Petrozavodsk, 24 October, 1941.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Captured Soviet hangar with gliders. Petrozavodsk, 24 October, 1941.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Crashed SB.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

January 29, 1944, Finnish Pe-2.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

January 25, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish Pe-2. June 30, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish SB. January 8, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish SB.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish SB.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

SB from the pilot’s cabin.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

This one could be one of two SH-2 captured in August 1942 as a result of a Finnish intelligence radio game.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

U-2 destroyed in August 8, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

IL-2 crashed in July 13, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

IL-2 crashed in July 13, 1944 near Vyborg.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Yak-9 destroyed in June 9, 1944. Its pilot was captured in a week after the crash.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

LaGG-3, 7 March 1942.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

LaGG-3 found in February 20, 1942, it became LG-2.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

LaGG-3 of the Finnish air forces (LG-3), July 9, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish I-153.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Hurricane 609 crashed in April 6, 1942.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Hurricane Z2585 that made an emergency landing in February 4, 1942 after fighting with Finnish battle-planes.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

I-16, December 10, 1941

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Aerocobra crashed in a fight in May 5, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish DB-3F. April 1, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Finnish DB-3.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Crashed Il-2. June 30, 1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Crashed Il-2. July 22,1944.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Kittyhawk, December 31, 1943.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

MBR-2, February 16, 1943.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

MBR-2, the date is unknown.

Soviet Planes 1941-44

Soviet Planes 1941-44

September, 2, 1944.

via deruluft

12 thoughts on “Soviet Planes 1941-44”

  1. Finnish Air Force must have been running the most colorful flying circus at the time. I remember we once tried to count number of countries from which the aircrafts came, and it was enormous. Keeping them airworthy must have been enormous task.

  2. For those wondering why the swastika is seen on the Finnish planes, they were allied with Germany during WWII to try and beat back Soviet aggression against Finland. it has nothing to do with supporting Naziism, but rather with the old adage “he enemy of my enemy is my friend.” The US and UK were allied with the USSR, so they were not likely to come to the aide of Finland at the cost of their ally the USSR. So, Finland didn’t have much choice in the matter as the USSR was allowed to swallow the Balkans without resistance at around the same time.

  3. The Great State of Finland was created by Russia in the Great Northern War. So Finlands attempt to bite off a piece of USSR in Baltic seems ungrateful!!! No pitty for traitors! They voluterely allied themselves with Nazi’s who by the way killed 6 million Jews, Half of civilian population of Belarus and Ukraine, 1/10 of population of Poland. So, I don’t see whats the argument here, they painted swasticas on their planes, then they are just as good as Nazis!

  4. The name Aerocobra is wrong, Airacobra is the correct. Bell P-39, have a Allison V12 engine, mounted behind the cockpit, with a axle sending the power to the propeller. The cockpit have two doors, in each side, like a sport car.
    From Brazil.

  5. About Hakaristi you shall check on baron Von Rosen who was a founder of Finnish Airforce in 1918. The Hakaristi was his family sign and it was in use in Finnish Airforce between 1918-44 (thanks ff!) – long time before nazis even existed…

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