Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

In 1985 the Moscow publishing house “Soviet Russia” issued a big album called “Volgograd” which included works of five Soviet photographers: R. Beniaminson, V. Pavlov, E. Evzerikhin, V. Kabyshev and V. Ivanov.

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

It’s the monument to V. Lenin.

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

It reads: “Glory to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union”.

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

Soviet City of the 80s

By the way, Volgograd is a hero city, the place where the battle for Stalingrad took place.

via home-for-heroes

19 thoughts on “Soviet City of the 80s”

  1. Volgograd should be renamed back to Stalingrad. This is the glorious name, and many elderly Germans still shiver in fear when they hear it.

    Very beautiful city of fantastic architecture of the Stalin era.

    • Yeah because many Russian “love” the name Stalin and reflect on his generosity, humanity and altruism for Slavic people. Levrenti Beria is another guy they should name a city after.

    • Hey! I know, maybe Germany can have a “Hitlervill” too, to honor their murderous puke.

      Yeah, all countries should honor their biggest murderers with a town/city named after them.

  2. The machines used for monuments are historically incorrect, which was common in the Evil Empire. The aircraft next to Il-2 is probably Lavochkin UTI (trainer, plus Lavochkins were used in Stalingrad in very limited numbers) and IIRC, the muzzle brake seen on one of the photos was not introduced before 1944.

  3. There was a Roman city named Ilium that sort of faded away. Few people know the name. Almost everyone knows it by its previous name – Troy, as described in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

    The Tsars called the city Tsaritsyn for centuries. In 1961 had its name changed to Volgograd as part of Soviet “destalinization”. But the city earned the name of Stalingrad with rivers of blood, and the Battle of Stalingrad finally broke the Nazi advances into the USSR.

    Changing the name was an insult to the people who fought and died for their city and country.

    Most people outside Russia don’t even know the name was changed. And most of the ones that do know don’t care; it will always be Stalingrad.

    • I think that Tsaritsyn , founded as a fort 1589, was a small town until about 1900, I read in Wikipedia that the word is old Turkic “Sary Sin” or “Sary Su” referring to the color of either the island in the Volga, or the river itself – yellow. (Must’ve been the color at a sunset!) But one writer suggested the word, meaning yellow , referred to the beautiful, spacious steppe to the west.

  4. Nice city. Too bad they abandoned traditional architecture in favor of dirt cheap and quick to build prefab “modern” buildings in the 50s-80s.

    Turns out the “workers paradise” idea of workers paradise was cheap, affordable, and quickly built housing that offered very basic accommodations. I guess they though that by the time the 20 yr lifespan of these structures was up their collective standard of living would have risen so much they would be tearing them down to build workers paradise 2.0 with more livable arrangements.

    Too bad they badly misjudged people’s willingness to give their all for the collective good. It runs counter to human nature. for example if you look at the agricultural output of the small minority of privately/traditionally run farms in the Soviet Union their output is at Western levels, while the collective farms were only capable of producing a fraction of that output. People need to have control over their own destiny and see the fruits of their labor to give it their all. Put them in a collective situation were they all unfairly benefit equally from the unequal contribution of their fellow man and they stop giving a f_ck about do their best. They’ll just get screwed anyway. Why bother. Just shut up and do your job.

  5. Stalin let it be known that no German POWs would be sent home to Germany until Stalingrad was rebuilt. German POWs did at least some of the repair and rebuilding work.

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