Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Lend-Lease was the program under which the United States of America supplied the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, China, Free France, and other Allied nations with materiel between 1941 and 1945.

Moscow has an interesting and not much known museum in school №1262 devoted to lend-lease military stuff. It was created by enthusiasts. Let’s see what exhibits the museum can show.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

General view of the hall

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Various things presented by veterans and their relatives to the museum. Soviet and American soldiers exchanged them when met.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

American “military” cigarettes

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Uniform that was completing military equipment and an American machine tool.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Stalingrad soldier with a Thompson submachine gun

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Jeep Willys of marshal Rokossovsky given to the museum by the marshal’s grandson. It’s still in running order.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Bullet-proof tyre section of the Willys

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

First-aid kit of the Willys

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Outfit of a pilot that was used in American planes.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Life-saving raft for pilots

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Folding motorbike for paratroopers. 3 minutes for getting ready after a parachute landing.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Canadian, American and English leather jackets.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

English, Soviet and American outfits.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Instructions

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Food aid. It must be noticed it often included children’s toys.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique tea can: Chiang Kai-shek, Stalin, Roosevelt, Churchill.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Soldier wearing the uniform of the USA air-assault division №101. The mannequin had a real prototype – staff sergeant Joseph Robert Beyrle – the only soldier of WWII who managed to serve both in American and Soviet armies.

Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow

Location: Moscow

via moscowwalks.ru

22 thoughts on “Unique Lend Lease Museum In Moscow”

  1. That tea can forgot to display the Communist Chinese and Mao they also fought the Japanese and they often went far out of thier way to help American airmen that had been shot down many of these airmen commented on how much better the Communists treated the local population and how they where much more committed to fighting the Japanese than the ROC seemed to be.

    No direct mention of the P-39 the overwhelming majority of production of that aircraft was for the Soviet Air Force.

    • Check your history! Mao and Chiang were both leaders on the Chinese mainland. European leaders backed Chiang over Mao for reasons of Geography. The long march took the red army under Mao away from the areas of concern to the allies. Chiang’s retreat onto Taiwan didn’t happen until AFTER WW2!

  2. long live comrade stalin!!!
    western country and western running dog to demonized comrade stalin!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • There’s also a Hellcat model but both are in American colours. The Lend/Lease material has Russian markings. The Willys Jeep is actually a FORD product! Wilys was the designer, Jeep from it’s designation, GP (general purpose), but made at Ford Detroit!

      • This was due to the fact that the Willys company did not have the capacity to manufacture the Jeeps in the numbers desired by the military.

      • What became known as the ‘Jeep’ (Life Magazine July 20, 1942) was designed by a team working for American Bantam of Butler, PA in October of 1940. Bantam, Willys and Ford had entered into a competition for contracts to produce a “Truck, 1/4 ton 4X4”.
        Prototypes were built and submitted by all 3 (Bantam BRC60, Ford Pygmy, Willys Quad). All performed well, revisions were made and small contracts were awarded and filled by Bantam, Ford and Willys for field testing (BRC40, Ford GP, Willys MA).
        Finally, Willys was awarded the contract (mostly on the strength of their “Go Devil” engine) with Ford as subcontractor. Bantam got the shaft.
        When production of the ‘standard’ G503 (US military designation) got underway by Ford (GPW- G- government P- 80″ wheelbase W- to the Willys pattern)and Willys MB (M- military B- 2nd design), most of the previously built (non- standard) ‘Jeeps’ went to lend lease. Almost all of the Bantams went to the USSR, along with early Ford and Willys offerings. When those were exhausted, ‘standard’ Ford GP and Willys MB vehicles were sent. They also got some amphibious ‘Seeps’ (Ford GPA- GP- Amphibious).
        Overall, Willys made more ‘Jeeps’ than Ford during WW2. Many (most) owners of WW2 ‘Jeeps’ do not realize that the majority of the body ‘tubs’ (and trailer bodies) were made by American Central Manufacturing (they built the bodies for the Cord 812 and made Pullman railroad coaches) and shipped to Willys and Ford for completion. Trailers (1/4 ton) were completed by Willys (MB-T),Bantam (T3) and other contractors.

    • Because it is a WWII museum perhaps they also have a model of a P-47D in USAAF markings they could have made one with VVS markings.The VVS also never flew the early models of P-40/KittyHawk either but they have a model of a USAAC P-40B/C as well.

    • Sure. It was fully paid back with gold (!).

      Not that much of a helping hand, more of business.

      Nestle was supplying to nazis as well – profit uber alles.

    • Sort of. The Act didn’t specify any value or replacement rules. Only durable goods, trucks, etc. counted. That material was to be used for the war and any remaining equipment be either returned or paid for at 90% discount. Conveniently, there was almost no durable goods remaining after the war. It would seem that ‘clerical errors’ made most of the Lend/Lease equipment disappear after VJ day.

    • That was never a part of the Lend-Lease plan actually the UK also did not pay because the US did not charge it was free.

      • Actually the British continued making payments related to Lend Lease goods until the 26th Dec. 2006, when they made a final payment of $82 million U.S. dollars. Thanks.

  3. On the 1st photo on placate typed: “22206 different types of airplanes were delivered to USSR in 1941-1945” on Russian. But it should be stated that “22206 airplanes of different types were delivered to USSR in 1941-1945″…

  4. I noticed that in your web site pictures of exhibits you showed a book “Amtorg Trading Company, 1942”. I am researching Lend Lease Payments made by Russia in the April-June time frame to the United States specifically in gold bullion. Does this record or others relate to this type of transaction.

    Sincerely

    John Chamberlin

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