Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Let us walk along the St. Petersburg metro labyrinths just like inspectors do…

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Starting from Gostinny Dvor station. Right behind it is a descent to the junction line.

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Each junction line in St. Petersburg has its name.

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Behind Sadovaya station

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

The arch is 9-10 m high

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

From the balcony

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Heading on to Admiralteiskaya station

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Various rooms on the way

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Admiralteiskaya station that has recently been opened

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Sportivnaya station is ahead

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Side way with a hermetic door in the end

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Those stairs lead to a closet with a beautiful number “555”.

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Time to go back

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg

Location: St. Petersburg

via samnamos

3 thoughts on “Underground Inspection In Saint Petersburg”

  1. Second an third picture. Why there is loose rails between normal track rails? Spare parts for future maintenance?

    • They are not loose and not spare parts. If I’m correct they strengthen the tracks against the forces between train and track. Another reason is I heard is that it is to keep the train somewhat on the track when it derails. But perhaps an expert know it better 🙂

    • Probably spare rails. Guardrails are for keeping the equipment under control in the event of a derailment. They are placed close to the base of the running rails and are spiked down solidly to control the train. Rail is rarely used for load distribution. The rail/tie system actually floats on top of the track bed with the ballast limiting movement and providing weather protection. The lack of solid attachment shows that those rails would not resist ANY forces!

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