Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Soil scientists arrive at Moscow to participate in the international soil scientists’ convention, 1930.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

The opening of the convention, 1930.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Participants of the international soil scientists’ convention visit the Kremlin, 1930.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Celebrating the 14-year anniversary of the revolution on Red Square. November 7th, 1931.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Road construction in Moscow, 1931.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

The Kremlin and the Mausoleum. Moscow, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

A homeless person in Moscow, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Two men on the roof with Red Square and the Kremlin in the background, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Getting on the tram, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Women and their children in poor neighborhoods of Moscow, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

A man waiting to be photographed by a street photograher, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Workers visit one of the museums of Moscow, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Church and Bolsheviks, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

This photo of Moscow’s Sverdlov Square was taken from top of the Bolshoi Theater.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

A parade on Red Square, 1932.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Moscow’s public market, 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

May Day’s parade on Red Square, 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

May Day’s parade on Red Square, 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Celebrating the October Revolution (1917), 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Celebrating the October Revolution (1917), 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Celebrating the October Revolution (1917), 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Celebrating the October Revolution (1917), 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

The final part of the parade to celebrate the October Revolution (1917), 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Wigs for sale, 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Professor Schmidt, the head of the expedition that made a non-stop voyage from Arkhangelsk to the Pacific Ocean on the steam icebreaker Sibiryakov, gives an interview in Moscow, 1933.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

A traffic controller on Red Square, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

“No smoking”.

Moscow’s Metro, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Okhotny Ryad Street, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Okhotny Ryad Street, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Moscow’s Metro, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

“Trains”.

Moscow’s Metro, 1935.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

S. Flor and V. Rogozhin playing chess, 1936.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

J. R. Capablanca and Ryumin playing chess, 1936.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Representatives of ethnic minorities in “new” Soviet Parliament, 1938.

Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists

Sports Festival on Red Square, 1938.

Location: Moscow

via humus

5 thoughts on “Moscow Of The 1930s As Seen By International Journalists”

  1. The cult of personality is a drag but note how chess was the important sport of the Russians throughout the Soviet period.

  2. One thing they have/had is public transportation. Outside a few large cities the US has almost none. Where I live there is no rail, no bus, no nothing. I must make a day’s journey next week. How I wish I could just board a train and leave the driving to someone else.

    Do you trolls get paid to make these negative posts?

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