Forgotten Moscow

Forgotten Moscow

Many people think they live in comfortable conditions in Moscow while some homes have no water supply systems and each winter turns into a struggle for life for them.

Forgotten Moscow

Novokuryanovo is a forgotten village not far from Butovo located inside that experimental rail ring. There is just one road leading here and plows don’t always come to these areas. The nearest store is situated miles away, in Shcherbinka. Gas supply is just a dream. People have to burn coal and wood to heat their homes which often triggers fires. Burglaries are quite common. Yet this place became part of Moscow as far back as in 1984.

Some say about Gypsies who founded the village but it’s just a myth. In fact, in the 1930s they moved people from Kuryanovo village to build an aeration station. Thus forming Novokuryanovo.

Forgotten Moscow

Ex-mayor Luzhkov once thought these were sheds. People living in the village consiting of 100 homes were supposed to be provided with new homes in 1985 but two thirds of them never did. Amazingly, but these 386 people never lost their hope either.

Forgotten Moscow

It’s not easy to talk someone here into giving an interview and that’s not their fault! There are plenty of bastards walking around waiting for the right moment to steal these people’s pensions and medals.

Forgotten Moscow

A local home.

Forgotten Moscow

This is Nikolay.

Forgotten Moscow

He lives with his brother and his wife.

Forgotten Moscow

It’s freezing in here because something’s wrong with the stove. They want to rebuild it in summer.

Forgotten Moscow

Forgotten Moscow

The only good thing about this place is the fact that its roof doesn’t leak yet.

Forgotten Moscow

People live under similar conditions here in Novokuryanovo.

Forgotten Moscow

But authorities don’t care.

Forgotten Moscow

This 86-year old lady was a teacher. She takes water from the water pump.

Forgotten Moscow

Surprisingly, but she doesn’t grumble at it but says she’s quite satisfied with her life. She lives with her son and they renovate their home little by little. She says it’s good to live in the country.

Forgotten Moscow

She refused help.

Forgotten Moscow

Another problem of the village is illegal immigrants who live here becasue policemen never check this place. They sometimes set fire to homes whose owners refuse to rent them out.

It would be fair to mention that there are still a couple of rather well-maintained buildings in the village.

Forgotten Moscow

Forgotten Moscow

Some houses are abandoned because their owners had either died or moved to a new place.

Forgotten Moscow

Let’s go inside this home.

Forgotten Moscow

Forgotten Moscow

An elderly couple lives here.

Forgotten Moscow

They heat their home by burning coal too.

Forgotten Moscow

The house is in terrible condition even though its roof has been reconstructed.

Forgotten Moscow

This coal is relatively good and they don’t have to break it into smaller pieces like they did last year.

Forgotten Moscow

Cats like it here!

Forgotten Moscow

This lady has very poor eyesight and it is her husband who has to take care of their household.

Forgotten Moscow

That’s what their life is. They live knowing that they won’t get help no matter how old, lonely and weak they are and will be.

Location: Moscow

via cr2.livejournal

11 thoughts on “Forgotten Moscow”

  1. Sad, but why people expect government get involved ? That’s ther property, they have to take care of it or sell and move to better place , nursing home perhaps . Had greandparent living like that, refused to move , sell or fix. After he dyed sold that house, never looked back or missed. No government involment , ita was my responsibility .

  2. By the 1980s the corrupt neo-Stalinist policies of Brezhnev and his allies neglected these people. And yet today after 20 years of capitalism they are still poor. Socialism is the viable answer.

  3. In the US, the difference is that their homes would have been condemned and bulldozed “for public good”. It’s not the problem of the authorities where the people can go to. Some would go to “subsidized” apartments, which may be good if you don’t mind the building managers snooping and telling you how to live.

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