Left After The Cold War

Left After The Cold War

Balaklava is crammed with unique military constructions built during the cold war. Today, we want to take you to “Object 100”, a missile complex which controlled the Black Sea.

Left After The Cold War

Entrance into “Object 100”. Many years ago, it used to be camouflaged with a special screen.

In 1954, when the cold war was in its height, they decided to build the first underground missile complex in the world. Several thousand builders were involved in construction works. Each worker’s background was thoroughly checked plus they had to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

Left After The Cold War

The missile shaft.

The rocket complex with a cruise missile C-2 was situated 500 m above sea level and was aimed to destroy enemy ships.

They used heat-resistant concrete to build the complex. Missiles were kept on special trays with their wings folded and were moved to their starting positions with special mechanisms.

Left After The Cold War

Missile shaft emergency exit.

Left After The Cold War

All that was many years ago. As for today, very little has remained, just concrete and some metal constructions.

In 2005, the complex became defenseless against looters who would come here by cars and trucks to steal metal.

Left After The Cold War

This place once became scenery for a movie which was sort of a response to Rembo-2. It is impossible to imagine how they managed to get a permission to shoot a movie in a secret complex!

Left After The Cold War

Rooms for the command post and personnel, fuel and missile storehouses, and diesel power stations were cut out in the rocks. The underground citadel was equipped with filter systems in case a nuclear attack took place.

Doors which were able to withstand a nuclear explosion have been stolen by looters.

Left After The Cold War

Cruise missiles were delivered to their starting positions by rails.

Left After The Cold War

It took them just a couple of minutes to launch a missile. “Object 100” included two divisions located 6 km away from each other. Each division had two launching facilities so it had 8 missiles total to destroy any ship.

Left After The Cold War

This is where control panels have been.

Left After The Cold War

“Emergency exit”.

Inside the missile shaft.

Left After The Cold War

“Dangerous zone”.

From 1957 till 1965, the complex carried out 25 firing practices. The complex was unachievable for both regular and nuclear weapons.

In 1982, the complex was modernized and the 3M44 Progress missile was added to the armory.

Left After The Cold War

Today it is the word “devastation” which can describe the complex best. Dripping water is the only sound coming here from the outside.

Left After The Cold War

No trolley carrying a nuclear charge will ever enter this place again.

Left After The Cold War

Looters have stolen everything they could find, including its barbed wire.

Left After The Cold War

One of the views soldiers serving in the complex could enjoy.

Left After The Cold War

50 km away, you will find is a military unit which served “Oblect 100”.

Left After The Cold War

“Ukraine”.

In 1996, “Object 100” was turned over to Ukraine.

Left After The Cold War

Its football field and VIP towers (for officers).

Left After The Cold War

This place needs cleaning badly.

Left After The Cold War

This used to be a cafeteria.

Left After The Cold War

An open window.

Left After The Cold War

Someone knew how to walk through the walls.

Left After The Cold War

Left After The Cold War

This is a piece of a newspaper which dates to February 20th, 1999.

Left After The Cold War

In this forest, you can find tons of useless concrete!

Left After The Cold War

This path leads to Balaklava.

Left After The Cold War

There was a time when it was alive, just like “Object 100”.

Location: The Balaklava Region

via aquatek-filips

9 thoughts on “Left After The Cold War”

    • The movie Odinochnoye plavanye (Solo Voyage, The Detached Mission) is available e.g. here, in english: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgIpyi0HCV0

  1. “This place once became scenery for a movie which was sort of a response to Rembo-2. It is impossible to imagine how they managed to get a permission to shoot a movie in a secret complex!”…Imagine this then my friend, Rubles, lots of them in the right hands, then permission granted.

  2. That’s how crazy the dopey cold war was. Some bureaucrat in Moscow had the job where he felt it was necessary to respond to Rambo of all people. Rambo in America is entertainment on a level with a cartoon. However, it was someone’s job to
    create an official response to what amounts to a cowboy and indian flick.

  3. How interesting. This is the infrastructure that we in the West were afraid of in the 1970s and 80s. To see it now is of great interest, as it shows that the past is just the past, it’s well over. We’re in a wonderful new world, and bad memories can be forgotten. Thank you.

    • Dont worry about the bad old memories, you’ll have plenty of new even more horrifying ones to take their place, real soon.

  4. hahahha dont u think they dont have newer and moderm ones? they never stopped….they continious buildin and makin weapons and bases and war equipment…so bad…

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