You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

We keep telling you about the fourteen darers who voluntary joined the army for a seven-day period. It’s day number three and all of them begin to understand how important such trivial things as a shower, comfortable bed and free time are.

So, that day they practiced tank and armoured personnel carrier driving.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

A soldier will never miss a chance to take a nap (anywhere!) because he doesn’t get enough sleep. They wake up at 6 a.m. and go to bed at 10 p.m.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

For some reason, in the morning they have breakfast first and only then they can take a shower.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Heading to a training ground.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Instructions on first medical aid.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Driving a tank is almost the same as driving a car. The difference is that you don’t feel the size of it and never will and the vision is terrible.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Soldiers were really excited to drive this embodiment of power and some of them even gave it a good bye kiss.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Dinnertime.

Some of the soldiers found the food disgusting and decided to go on a diet.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

‘Congratulation!’

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

More classes in the evening.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Some photographs to remember the military service by.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Soldiers were given tommy guns…

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

And took tests in their assembling and disassembling.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Day number four was devoted to tactical maneuvers.

On the picture you see a soldier taking a bravery test. He should let the tank drive over him.

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

You Are In The Army Now, Part 2

Location: The Vladimir Region

via macos

24 thoughts on “You Are In The Army Now, Part 2”

  1. “Driving a tank is almost the same as driving a car. The difference is that you don’t feel the size of it and never will and the vision is terrible.”

    No wonder. Maybe they should have tried a T-90.

      • Of course. Thats hazing. There is no military in the world that does not have hazing in the ranks, in one form or another and to varying degrees.

        If you mean the brutal, systematic and sometimes deadly version that plagued Russia after the demise of the Soviet military, that has thankfully become virtually non-exsitent.

      • Of course it exist. Those who served 8 months are dembelya. But dedi are anyone who served like 2-4 months more than ne coming soldiers. They milk youngsters,like taking AK automat from soldier hands as for check and then they take out some detail. Then they say we will return it if you’ll give us 1500 rubles. Its what happened with some guy whom i know.

      • [山下智久]

        Why is it that you can post in Chinese, but I can’t post in Cyrillic? If your question is directed at me, and if you are asking if I drove tanks, then yes.

        I was with the 4th Tank Guards for four years, and I did crew training for T-64’s, T-72’s, T-80’s and T-90’s.

    • Good question. Probably draft dodgers.

      Really pisses me off. It’s like with the ultra-nationalists. They go out on the streets yelling, “we will destroy you, chechnya” or something like, all in the name of serving mother Russia. But when it comes to actually wearing the uniform of mother Russia and defending her, they are the first ones to run away when the draft season begins every April and October.

  2. http://media.englishrussia.com/112011/armyday4/armyday4photos-17.jpg

    What an excellent tactic, aiming an assault rifle at a TANK! Yep, that’s gonna stop it right in its tracks.

  3. Among these men are 3 Russian “Mayak” radio DJs (the guy with a big machinegun for example), who offered the other listeners to serve with them for a week. They report about it in “Stillavin and his friends” at mornings, daily. Some of them served before, some didn’t.
    The show has promotional and explanatory (along with the fun) purposes.

  4. When ever I check out these post about the Russian military, I am struck by all of the similarities of the military the world over. I think that even though I’ve been out of the service for 23 years. I could join any army, or navy, of any country or period of history and be able to fit right in. That part about soldiers never missing a chance for a nap any where, how true! My rack on the ship was right below the 5 inch gun mount, and right next to the ammunition hoist, and I’ve slept right through firing exercises!

  5. This is stupid. While I think that there should be no conscription (only voluntary enlistment), I still respect people who go there on their will.

    However, this “7 day in the army” is pure idiocy – it is stunt/bad joke. Either serve properly or don’t serve at all. What’s the purpose of 7 day pretend service?

    • The purpose is comedy i would guess. As i said, Russian “Stripes” (like the movie). Although my comment seems to have been taken as Russophobic propaganda and red flagged into oblivion once again… lmao, Russophiles need to develop a sense of humor. Seriously…

  6. Avoiding the service in the army used to be a question of pride during the bad old days of Communist Czechoslovakia. Getting the “Blue Book” (i.e. certificate of unability to serve in the Communist armed forces) was a holiday celebrated harder than birthday or Christmas 🙂
    IIRC, the name of the local rock band from late 60s, “Blue Effect”, is based on the fact that it was open only to those musicians who were proudly showing their “Blue Books”.

  7. Anyone notice that they called the Kalashnikovs “Tommy Guns”? Who writes for ER and can’t identify an AK when he sees one? I mean I wouldn’t expect him to ID it as an AKS-74 but a “Tommy Gun”? Really.

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