History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Military Academy of Strategic Rocket Forces located in Moscow is one of the best institutes of higher military and technical education and a large research institute in Russia.

Today, its museum opened its doors, so let’s go in!

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

The building where the academy is situated, is the largest building built before the revolution (it’s 379 m long) and an architectural monument of the 18th – the 19th century.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

The museum of the academy tells its visitors about the history of the academy and its employees and graduates.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

A rockets control panel.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

These keys had to be turned synchronously by two officers.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

A giant globe.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

In the academy, there is a large collection of literature a lot of museums ‘would kill for’. The oldest book here is ‘About Military Service’ and it was published in 1484! The collection also has the first book on military science which was released in 1649.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

In the background there is a combustion chamber of the first Soviet ballistic rocket.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This calculation device was made in the 60s.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

The guide.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

A nuclear explosive detonating fuse. Without it, a nuclear bomb turns into radioactive trash.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Experimental laser guns designed to be used in space (against aliens) where regular guns can’t be applied.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

In the space department, there are a lot of exhibits which are still prohibited from photographing.

On the ceiling you see a copy of the first artificial satellite launched by the USSR in 1957.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Under the satellite, there is a ‘Soyuz’ space ship. The first docking of space ships happened in 1969 (‘Soyuz-4’ and ‘Soyuz-5’) and this is what the cosmonauts saw when they opened the manhole.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This is a space ‘bathroom’.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Those green balls on the reconnaissance ship are mini engines which are used for turning the ship around and the violet window is a photographic camera.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Space cameras’ film is 0.5 m wide!

At first, to receive the shots, they had to bring the ship down to earth. Now, they use digital cameras and there is no such necessity anymore.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This is a real reconnaissance satellite which worked for the Soviet Union and after that made a safe landing. The empty space down there was for explosives which were to destroy the tape in case the satellite was captured by the enemy.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

‘Do not touch! Fatally dangerous!’

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Solar batteries.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This satellite launched in 1964 allowed people of Vladivostok to watch Brezhnev on TV.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This satellite preserved some space dust on it.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This is the equipment from capsules in which astronauts land on earth. Each seat is made individually for each astronaut.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

History And Cosmonautics Museum

This is the control panel Yury Gagarin worked on.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

The upper buttons on the left were made to protect the ship from astronauts in case they went crazy in space (becasue they didn’t know for sure how space affects the human).

History And Cosmonautics Museum

A window opening the view of the Earth.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

A tank with pressed xenon.

History And Cosmonautics Museum

Location: Moscow

via mmet

22 thoughts on “History And Cosmonautics Museum”

    • Your political agenda is tiring and utterly boring. How much money US spends on all the junk in space, the military flying and wheeled junk, how much money Americans and EU spend on all the food junk, electronic junk, how much people spend on all the Ivy League junky education? So primitive mind and russophobia of yours makes you blind, you cannot just appreciate achievements. Pity you.

      • AMEN TO THAT. I WHOLEHEARTEDLY agree with EVERYTHING you just said here. It really IS sad when a person cannot even simply appreciate the achievements made for they are regardless of who made them. Let’s not forget that the Soviets were FAR ahead of us in the space race back then, so THIS stuff was stuff that was BEYOND OUR CAPABILITY AT THE TIME! So, please, TELL ME how this is “JUNK”! It may be NOW because of how far technology has come but it sure as hell wasn’t junk back when it was used! This is some truly interesting stuff. You would be VERY hard pressed to see even HALF of America’s equivalent in any museum. What a FASCINATING experience I had looking this over. Do you EVER, in a MILLION YEARS think you will *EVER* see an AMERICAN nuclear trigger? HELL NO! This is the first time I’ve EVER seen something like that and it is simply FASCINATING.

    • Comment was made by a different Hirsh, but whatever. Not like i care what most you think anyway. 🙂 🙂 🙂

      This is not junk. It’s money well spent, whatever country is funding it.

  1. Great stuff. Interesting that this should post today as it has just been reported that the Boris Chertok, the designer of Sputnik passed away at the age of 99.

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