Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

According to its director, this museum is one of the most popular museums in the St. Petersburg Region.  It is located in Osinovets Village and is called ‘The Museum of the Road of Life’. The Road of Life was the ice road transport route across the frozen Lake Ladoga, which provided the only access to the besieged city of Leningrad in the winter months during 1941–1944 while the perimeter in the siege was maintained by the German Army. The siege lasted for 29 months from 8 September 1941, to 27 January 1944. Over one million citizens of Leningrad died from starvation, stress, exposure and bombardments.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

‘The Road of Life’. One of the locomotives delivering fuel, food and ammunition to Leningrad.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The railway station. Station Lake Ladoga. It is also a museum now.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

‘Lake Ladoga’.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

It is so big that it is hard to believe that this is a lake and not a sea.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga is one of the largest lakes in Europe. It stretches 207 kilometers from north to south and 136 kilometers from west to east. Its average depth is 51 meters.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

They say that the lake is unpredictable and weather here may change any minute. Thus, in September, 1941, a sudden storm destroyed dozens of boats and killed over a thousand people.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Ice is never smooth in winter and the lake is covered with ice hummocks which complicated the construction of the road.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

‘The Road of Life’.

Entrance to the museum.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

On the square in front of the museum, there are a lot of exhibits. This is the military transport aircraft Li-2.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Such planes delivered food and medicaments to the besieged city.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The Road of Life began to operate on 20 November 1941 when the first convoy of horse-drawn sleighs brought supplies to the city. Shortly thereafter, the ice road began receiving truck traffic. Via the Road of Life, supplies could be brought into the city, and civilians evacuated to the still Soviet-controlled opposite coast. During the winter of 1941–42 the ice corridor of the ‘Road of Life’ operated for 152 days, until 24 April. About 514,000 city inhabitants, 35,000 wounded soldiers, industrial equipment from 86 plants and factories, and also some art and museum collections were evacuated from Leningrad during the first winter of the blockade. The total number of people evacuated from the siege of Leningrad through the Road of Life was about 1.3 million, mostly women and children who made the journey on foot.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

A monument to the military units which protected the Road of Life from German artillery and airplanes.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The tank T-34 turret.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Antiaircraft, field and naval guns.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

This light buoy helped ships to navigate.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

A self-propelled cutter. Carrying capacity: 25 tons, speed: 5 knots.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The towing steamer Izhorets 8.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The high speed vessel MO-215. It could float as fast as 50 kmh and was used for different purposes.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Within the first two weeks of using the road, 157 vehicles fell through the ice. Drivers rode with their doors open to be able to escape from the falling car, but not all of them were that quick. Within the first two winters about 1100 vehicles sank which is every fourth car.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Stoplights remained undamaged.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

A fragment of another vehicle.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

This looks like parts of the attack plane Ilyushin Il-2.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Are those traces of bullets?

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The museum. The exposition consists of five halls situated chronologically.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

A 45 mm gun and a 120 mm trench mortar Maxim.

Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life

The electricity was off at the museum that is why the map is not illuminated.

20 thoughts on “Lake Ladoga And The Road Of Life”

  1. Where is the “human suffering” museum of Leningrad ? ? ? ? ? ? just military junk is not enough to understand,how the peoples of Leningrad fought for their lives ! ! ! ! ! ! !

    • In St. Petersburg there are several museums devoted to the human cost of the siege. The largest and most famous one is just as you enter St. Pete from the Pulkovo airport.

      However if one really wants to get an idea of the human cost then head to north-east St. Pete (Piscaryovka) and head toward the cemeteries where the victims of the siege are buried in mass graves.

      Also in the same location is a smaller museum that details what daily life was like back then.

      There are several other, smaller monuments to the siege scattered about the city. Tucked away on a side street on the Petrograd side is a wonderful monument to the female defenders of Leningrad.

      Probably the best monument to that time are the Russians who lived through that time. If one has an opportunity to speak at length with an old Russian it should not be missed.

    • Russian history is neglected all across Russia in places just like this one. It seems everyone is for preserving Russian history until they’re asked to pay for it.

      • Hirsh, at last you are beginning to understand. Just don’t conveniently forget that next time something like this is brought up and you feel that need to bash something about Russia.

    • Renovation ? Look at the exponats outside, these wooden ships are falling apart and rest is rusting. Btw, one of these guns is german 88mm multi purpose gun…

  2. That looks like an original loaf of “bread” there. Horrid stuff. A little bit of wheat (or other grain) flour, floor sweepings, and sawdust!

    This is interesting. I’ve seen a lot about this.

    One thing you left out though, is that million people died, mainly because stalin wouldn’t let them leave! They didn’t stay because they wanted to, they had to.

    I doubt everybody could have gotten out in time, but a more could have if he had “allowed” them to leave.

  3. The aircraft may be an IL2 or a DC3 or a C47; the 3 planes are identical from this angle. Only from the top can the difference be noted. The IL2 had an added clear dome for navigation.

  4. This Finland-issue is a bit special. I’d just like to point out that Finland is not a very old country. Up until 1917 it belonged to either Sweden or Russia depending on who won the latest Sweden-Russia war. Also don’t forget that in WWII Finland sided with Hitler´s Germany, sure the reason for them doing so is easy to see….Who-ever is against my enemy is with me… The same reason that Pinochet sided with China… they were against the USSR

  5. What an interesting site. I cant believe there 3or more years without comments. St Petersburg, Leningrad and especially Lake Ladoga which were so important in WWII,while devastating to a population, at the same time showed the strength of human determination against the evils of the German armies. I almost forgot about this huge lake and how it served back then.
    I am not real current on politics around the Russia of 2015 nor how it might be in its northwest borders compared with the southern areas either. Even what I do get, never sure how much reality is contained in American or BBC press I get.

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