C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

A C-189 613 submarine is moored to the pontoon pier at the  Lieutenant Schmidt Embarkment. The submarine was built in 1955 at a  Baltic factory. It is the oldest submarine of the postwar construction which is still afloat.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Project 613 Soviet diesel-electric torpedo middle submarine is the first and most numerous type of submarines built after the WWII. The engineering design was made by Efgrafov Y. E. and in August 1948 it was approved. The first submarine was launched in October 1950. In 1951 it was affiliated to the navy. Since 1951 to 1958, they built 215 submarines of this type in the USSR and 21 submarines in China. It was the biggest submarine line in the history of the Soviet shipbuilding; on a world scale, it is the second biggest after the German Type VII submarine line built during World War 2.

A combat submarine aimed at fighting against the enemy’s ships, drifting mines, and reconnaissance. Project 613 submarines had been on duty in the seas and the oceans up to the late 80s. They were also used for new weapons tests and as personnel training units.  Some of them were converted for other purposes.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Mir sailor and C-189 submarine.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

This Project 613 submarine was built in 1954-1955 at a Baltic factory. Today it is the only submarine of its type left. It had been a training unit up to 1988 and in 1990 it sank.  It was uplifted in 2005 and two years later they began turning it  into a museum that opened on March 18, 2010.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Length – 76 meters;

Width – 6.3 meters;

Displacement: above-water – 1050 tons; under-water – 1350 tons;

Depth of submergence – 200 meters;

Crew – 54 members (8 officers);

Autonomy – 30 days;

Maximum speed: under-water – 13.1 knots; above-water – 18.25 knots;

Time it can stay submerged – 200 hours.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

This church can be seen through the periscope of the submarine.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

The submarine is divided into 7 sections. The first one is a nose torpedo section; it is dwelling.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

These are four 533-millimetre torpedo tubes.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Bunks.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

This is not a torpedo. It is a submarine simulator.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Here’s the second section (by the way, it is not that easy going through these doors). It is an accumulator section. It is also dwelling.  The accumulator batteries cannot be seen in the picture because they are located in the lower part of the section.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

The first section again.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

These are naval officers’ cabins, a mess room,  and a deck cabin.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Everybody inside the submarine can hear sounds coming from the sonar.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

The third section is a central station. It is a control center as well.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

Sonarman cabin, radar operator cabin, course control station, depth control station, dive and surfacing control station are situated here.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

You can find a lot of valves here too.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

The periscope.

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg

The fourth section is an accumulator section. It is dwelling. It is also a ticket office. An adult ticket costs 300 rubles (about 10 USD). They have discounts: 200  rubles (about 6,5 USD) for a student ticket, and 100 rubles (3,5 USD) for a children’s ticket.

7 thoughts on “C-189 Submarine Museum, St. Petersburg”

  1. Um, in the translation it says “A C-189 613 submarine”..

    To be accurate it should read, in English, “An S-189 613 submarine”..

    Right?

    Reply
    • I`ll tell you more. My father worked at the authority agency and told me one funny story about this submarine. What happened in 1990 (right before the Soviet Union fall) – it sank because of the negligence of TWO DRUNK SAILORS). It took 15 years to uplift this training unit and renovate.
      Here`s one winter photo, which I took in 2008 (but I`ve never visited museum yet, since later I left Russia).
      http://img507.imageshack.us/img507/9651/dsc00078yv0.jpg

      Reply

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