The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

During 20 years  photographer Lucien Perkins covered events in Russia and other former Soviet countries. He came to Moscow for the first time in 1988 for the historic meeting of Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. In 1993 he again went to Russia for six months and he felt that it was absolutely different country. Photos of Perkins not only reflect the major political events of the time, but also capture the spirit of freedom that prevailed in hearts of Russian people in the 90s.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A lonely demonstrator and communist walks on the street, covered with stones, after the bloody conflicts with police, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A beaten communist with a portrait of Joseph Stalin during the march to Red Square, May, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A sailor and his girlfreind at the Navy Day celebration in the Moscow Central Park of Culture and Rest, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Dancing people in a Moscow nightclub, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Girls are waiting for their turn during the christening of priests of the Russian Baptist church, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A crowd of young people, held by police during a rock concert on Red Square in 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A recidivist demonstrates his tattoos while his cellmates give a coarse laugh. The corrective labor colony in Kovrov (240 km from Moscow), 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Women and children save themselves from the police raid on a Gypsy camp in the woods near Moscow, 1993. Then law authorities found documents, money and jewelry, apparently stolen from foreigners.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Crowds of people came to look at tanks that surrounded the White House, during the confrontation of Yeltsin and parliamentarians in 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Demonstrators look at the tanks, going to the White House, October, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Mother weeps at the funeral of her son, who was a soldier of the elite special forces. He was killed in October, 1993 during the capture of the Parliament by forces devoted to Yeltsin.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

After the USSR collapse in many former Soviet republics, including Georgia, civil wars broke out. In the photo: ethnic Georgians run away from Abkhazia, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Georgian soldiers and civilian refugees from Abkhazia look at a taking off helicopter, 1993.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Pioneers during the speech of communist leader Gennady Zyuganov in the center of Krasnoyarsk, 1996.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

An elderly couple with a portrait of Stalin during the communists’ meeting in support to Gennady Zyuganov at the presidential elections. Moscow, 1996.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

The first and the last Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev and his wife Raisa fly to Samara during presidential campaign in 1996. Only 5% of voters supported Gorbachev at those elections.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Muscovites in a polling station during the first Russian presidential election in 1996.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

A Cossack and passers-by watch Patriarch Alexy II, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, leaving a polling station during the presidential election, 1996.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Policemen beat spectators striving to get to the stage during a rock concert on Red Square, 1996.

The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins

Yeltsin is warmly welcome during his visit to Kazan, 1996.

via bigpicture

27 thoughts on “The Russian 90s By Lucien Perkins”

  1. Cool Pics. It is telling that violent civil war broke out so quickly in the outlying states. There must have been a lot of ethnic tension that was stamped down by the Soviets.

    • What violent civil war?

      As the saying goes: “it’s better to remain silent and thought a fool, then to speak and remove all doubt”.

      • With civil war in the outlying states he probably means the war between Armenia and Azerbeidjan over Nagorno-Karabach, the civil war in Georgia and the conflicts over Abkhsia and South-Ossetia, the conflict in Moldova with the Transdnistrian republic, the two Chechen wars… it might look like the saying mostly applies to you.

    • Yes Soviets are really bad just stamping down rasiscm. Ethnis wars should be fought anywhere. Russia should be today more like America, helping other states starting wars..

  2. Russia may yet prevail over other western countries by learning from the mistakes of others.China and Japan are very successful nations because they keep their own national identity and do not pander to minorities and political profligates that sanction such nonsense.The myth of the great melting pot has proven itself to be a disaster.

    • False. He looks more like a Bard. But I know that you dont know what a Bard is, neither it bothers you. You want just to troll here without thinking and find your prejudices in the pictures.

  3. Unfortunately, freedom in both the U.S. and Russia today means the freedom to be exploited by the wealthy, freedom to lose your job without cause, freedom to fall into poverty, freedom to be homeless.

    • There’s also freedom to overspend and borrow like there’s no tomorrow, living in a state of denial… until you get owned by somebody else. But only arrogant deaf governments do that.

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