The Museum In A Submarine

The Museum In A Submarine

Do you feel like seeing the inside of a former submarine vessel which is now being used as a museum?

The Museum In A Submarine

B-396 submarine vessel was put into operation in 1981 and used till 1998. Since 2006 the vessel had become a museum exhibit and was open for visitors.

The Museum In A Submarine

A watch bell or ‘rynda’ in Russian. The word is originated from English. During the reign of Peter I much attention was given to development of navigation. The experience of navigation was borrowed from the Englishmen. ┬áMany words were translated from English into Russian much later including the phrase ‘ring the bell’ that was interpreted in Russian as ‘v ryndu bei’. That’s how the bell was called a rhynda.

The Museum In A Submarine

It is necessary to mention that the submarine has undergone several changes. In particular, openings were made giving people an opportunity to walk inside.

The Museum In A Submarine

The submarine has 6 torpedoes in the torpedo room.

The Museum In A Submarine

Torpedo launcher.

The Museum In A Submarine

A diver’s suit used to save crew members.

The Museum In A Submarine

A loudspeaker.

The Museum In A Submarine

Visitors are being watched carefully.

The Museum In A Submarine

Officer’s cabin.

The Museum In A Submarine

Boat toilet or marine head. Some time ago marine heads were decorated with different figures like mermaids and lions.

The Museum In A Submarine

Control room.

The Museum In A Submarine

Torpedo remote control.

The Museum In A Submarine

The Museum In A Submarine

Minehunting station.

The Museum In A Submarine

An engine telegraph works as following: the captain chooses a position that corresponds to the respective capacity. ┬áThe data is transferred into the engine room where a sound produced attracts a sailor’s attention. The sailor follows the captain’s order setting up the corresponding capacity value and adjusting the telegraph.

The Museum In A Submarine

The remote controls immersion and diving.

The Museum In A Submarine

Depth.

The Museum In A Submarine

A navigator.

The Museum In A Submarine

Radars.

The Museum In A Submarine

Radio cabin.

The Museum In A Submarine

This section is a mere glamorous museum with pictures, amulets and other things belonging to submariners.

The Museum In A Submarine
A boat model.

The Museum In A Submarine

Captains in American movies periodically hit their heads against such a globe valve.

The Museum In A Submarine

Red light is switched on at night. It prevents submariners from being blind when they contact with the environment.

The Museum In A Submarine
Motor control.

The Museum In A Submarine

Intercommunication telephone.

The Museum In A Submarine

The Museum In A Submarine

The Museum In A Submarine

The Museum In A Submarine

Sailors’ beds.

The Museum In A Submarine

Internal design.

The Museum In A Submarine

The devices based in the section where submariners slept allowed to control the situation.

via antonio-j

18 thoughts on “The Museum In A Submarine”

  1. That stuff in the “radio room” looks like it was stuffed in there as an after though. I hope that’s just a display and not how it really was. Like maybe it was storage for radio’s or something.

  2. Oh… You suffered a lot in there?… Russian Navy is no Carnival Cruise. It’s mission is to produce tough proven sailors, to sink ships and blow up targets. Not to get you spoiled and lazy.

  3. Don’t worry my dear baby boy. Those paper jumpsuits… I can’t forget I’ve also spent some time with numerous sweaty sailors in my room… I remember some of them were Russian… Mommy knows. It would soon pass my dear.

    • Musa, no child was hurt here. I enjoyed my experience, and only my son, a fat adult who can’t forget his experiences with a lot of Russians in a tight space.

  4. Now I understand why this guy hates anything related to Russia. He was traumatized by 67 hardened Russian sailors who watched him cry for pizza and a private toilet.

  5. Sure one hell of a Amateur Radio Station on that sub. But lets face it you didn’t talk to these guys on duty crusing eastern coast of USA. The call sign is familiar. 73 VE3FFD

  6. Also curious as to the location of this. Perhaps in Piscaryovka in north-east St. Petersburg? It’s a small place and at first glance looks to be a playground. But they have a sub outside in the yard and a small museum next to it.

Leave a Comment