All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Museum of civil aviation is located in Ulyanovsk near an airport. It is a unique place that you just shouldn’t miss if you like planes.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Antonov An-14 “Pchelka” was designed to replace the An-2, but it could not do this. Its mass production began in 1966 and ended in 1972. The An-2 started to be manufactured only in 1992.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The AN-24 is a passenger turboprop aircraft for the lines of small and medium ranges. In 1963 it began to make regular passenger flights between Moscow, Voronezh, and Saratov (its capacity is 50 passengers).

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Mielec M-15 is a jet agricultural aircraft, developed and manufactured in Poland in the 1970s by an order of the USSR. A strange arrangement corresponds to tasks performed by this airplane.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

«Let L-410 Turbolet» is a universal twin-engine aircraft for local airlines, which replaced the AN-2. It is the first aircraft of foreign production that flew in the Soviet air lines. Its other names: L-410, Let, Let A-410, Turbolet, Cheburashka, Elka.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Mil Mi-8is a Soviet/Russian multipurpose helicopter, developed in the early 1960s. It is the most popular twin-engined helicopter in the world, and it is also included in the list of the most popular helicopters in the aviation history. It is widely used for many civilian and military purposes.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Mil Mi-4 is helicopter of the middle class. It had a lot of modifications.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Mil Mi-2 is a Soviet multipurpose helicopter, developed in the early 1960s. It is widely used for many civilian and military roles. Before the end of its production in 1992, more than 5400 units had been built.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Mil Mi-6 is a heavy military transport helicopter. It is the first mass production helicopter in the world that was equipped with two turboprop engines with the free power turbine. Its layout scheme is considered to be classic. The Mi-6 had the greater load-lifting  capacity during those times. It set various world records.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Ilyushin IL-62 is a passenger aircraft for ultra extent airlines. It was produced serially in 1966-1995. A total number of manufactured aircrafts is 277. Several world records for speed and range of a flight was established by the IL-62. For several decades the IL-62 served as the “board number 1” for the transport of the Soviet leadership.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Tupolev TB-1 is a Soviet bomber aircraft. It the first in the world all-metal heavy twin-engine serial bomber monoplane. The aircraft was developed during 9 months and assembled in 1925. Besides flights from Moscow to New York, the TB-1 was involved in the rescue of the icebreaker crew of “Chelyuskin”.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

Its screws were made of wood.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Tupolev Tu-124 is a Soviet passenger aircraft for medium range airlines. This aircraft was designed to replace the old IL-14 for local routes, but it did not earn a lot of popularity: a little later it was practically replaced by the Tu-134 that had similar characteristics.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The capacity is 56 passengers.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Tupolev Tu-116 was a modification of the the Tu-95, it was transformed from a bomber into a passenger aircraft for long-range flights of the Soviet leadership. The airplane was built to the case of unexpected delays in the production of the first Tu-114. Here is the last remained copy.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Tupovel Tu-104 is the first Soviet and one of the first in the world passenger jet which rose into the air. On the 15th of February, 1961, at an altitude of 10 km, the first in the Soviet Union observation of the solar eclipse was made from the Tu-104.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Aero L-29 “Dolphin” is a Czechoslovak training aircraft that made its first flight in April 5, 1959. In 1961 it was chosen as the main training aircraft for the participating countries of the Warsaw Pact. About 3,500 aircrafts were built.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Antonov An-26 is a turboprop military transport aircraft, a modification of the AN-24.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Yakovlev Yak-40 is a passenger aircraft for local airlines, designed in the USSR in the 60s.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Yakovlev Yak-42 is a medium-range three-engined passenger aircraft, developed in the USSR in the middle 1970s to replace the technically outdated Tupovel Tu-134.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Ilyushin IL-86 is a four-engine wide-body medium range passenger aircraft. It is the first and most popular Soviet/Russian wide-body passenger aircraft.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Ilyushin IL-14 is a twin-engine reciprocating Soviet aircraft, developed in the late 1940s to replace the outdated Lisunov LI-2 and IL-12.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The Tupolev Tu-144 is a Soviet supersonic airliner, developed in the 1960s. It is the museum pride because the aircraft combine a lot of of advanced developments and engineering solutions.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The economy class.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

The business class.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum

Opaque yellowish windows protected passengers from the solar radiation as the plane flew at the height of 20 km.

All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum


Location:Ulyanovsk

via d-a-ck9

42 thoughts on “All the Soviet and Russian Aviation History In One Museum”

  1. Tu-144 : a great work of soviet spy. But they seemingly did not have an access to the interior of the Concorde, as the Tupolev looks more like a plane of the 50ies 😉

      • Because they did not copy it completely 😉
        You can have a look here for some hints at the extent of the spying :
        http://tu144.tripod.com/history.html
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tupolev_Tu-144

        But that’s not a surprise : Soviet Union invested in spying what it did not invest in R&D. And was naturally strong in sciences which did not need much investments (like mathematics)

        Funny that some still think that TU-144 was not a copy of Concord : it is just so obvious and backed by facts (arrests of Sergei Fabiew and Sergei Pavlov among others).

        • It flew first because in the Soviet Union they could skip the months and years of safety checks and test flights. Pilots were just commanded to make it fly.

    • The Concordski had so many service failures in it’s brief lifespan that the government was forced to take it out of service. Neither Concord, nor Concordski, should have ever been permitted to fly commercially. The fatal crash of the Concord in Paris was due to tire fragments penetrating the fuel tank and that was cause for an instant declaration of air unworthiness.

  2. Both the brits and the soviets spyed on each other at the time. However, the fragile Tupolev design was flawed for airliner use, and rushed to operation prematurely (political reasons). It still is the first supersonic passenger plane, though.

  3. What an amazing collection of aircraft. It seems to need extra funding though – the undercarriages of several craft appear to have collapsed.

  4. I think a Tu-144 crashed at the Paris Air Show back in the 1970s and some speculated that French and British interests had the plane sabotaged so that it would crash during it display routine at the show.

  5. At the Paris Air Show, there was a French Mirage fighter spying and distracted the pilot, who began to make strange turns. The French admitted it years later (the Mirage), but anyway, the Tu-144 was too weakly designed to prosper.

  6. what a pathetic museum! rusted hulks of aircraft strewn about a field. do the russians understand that all modern, western countries mock their crude, backwards, silly attempts at national patriotism?
    to russia: we in the successful half of the world see everything about your country (its history, culture, traditions, people, achievements, etc.) as nothing more than dark comedy. englishrussia.com is a humor website, and all of you are its jokes.

  7. Thanks for all thats information, only one thing i cant find, any faks about the counterpart of Russias from the US B-70 Mach 3 Valkriey Projekt, the only drawing in the about atomar powered Bomber looks like it

  8. My father (born in Moscow, 1890; claimed to have learned to fly about 1909 in france. Explained to me that he performed exhibition flights in Russia and was one of the first to do an outside loop. I wonder if there is any record of him. Alexander Alexis Poliakoff.

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