This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

These pictures of Moscow are taken from the 200-m tall Federation Tower. Houses, cars, people – all looks like toys.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

River Port.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

A railway station.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

Waiting for a bus.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

A railway bridge.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

Kiyevsky Rail Terminal.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

Mirax Plaza.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

Former hotel “Ukraine”.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

The roof of the Imperia Tower.

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

This Cute Tiny Moscow

Lomonosov Moscow State University.

23 thoughts on “This Cute Tiny Moscow”

    • They are called “tilt-shift” lenses (TS, if pictures were taken with Canon) or “perspective-control” lenses (PC, in Nikon case). The main point is that it allows you to tilt focus plane (usualy it is parallel to film/sensor).
      I would say, in this case, Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L lenses were used.

      Reply
  1. It’s done on a ‘lens baby’, not a tilt and shift.

    But you can make the same effect from a standard shot in Photoshop. Just create duplicate layer, blur it and then carefully erase the parts you want sharp.

    Reply
  2. Looks like these have been done in photoshop…

    The focal plane is not accurate and has been artificially created using a gradient mask in photoshop.

    Some of these work, but some are terrible.

    Reply
  3. It’s amazing, truely amazing. Everything looks unusually like a diorama or miniature of he real thing.I do pratography and I am at a loss to find what this person did to make these pictures appear as they do. Other than a polarized and also brown/yellow tint filter, I’m unable to know Is there someone who knows, please speak to us.?

    Reply
  4. Traditionally, you would use a tilt shift lens however with todays digital editing software this illusion can be accomplished very simply with some gradient blurs at the top and bottom of your image.

    Reply

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