Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

In the village Polibino there is a very unusual water tower constructed in 1896.

Abandoned In Russia

The tower simply fascinates.

Abandoned In Russia

Rusty spiral stairs leading to the top. This construction seems to be very unstable but there is a fact that proves the contrary. It’s been 115 years since the year it was constructed and it still didn’t fall.

Abandoned In Russia

View from the ground.

Abandoned In Russia

There is the Nechaevs’ farm next to it.

Abandoned In Russia

The castle built in the end of the 18th century.

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Ancient stairs leading to the roof.

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Very beautiful metal stairs and lots of garbage on the floor.

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

The second floor. A big room with some remains of the parquet.

Abandoned In Russia

Corridor leading to the main building.

Abandoned In Russia

More spiral stairs.

Abandoned In Russia

The main hall with remains of the stove in the corner.

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

And this is the last abandoned place for today – Dmitry Solunsky Cathedral built in 1891.

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

Abandoned In Russia

via  macos and frantsouzov

21 thoughts on “Abandoned In Russia”

  1. “Lenin is watching you.”
    Well, I’m watching him, too. Reading about him. I’m “studying as Lenin studied.”
    Actually, depopulation is not all that bad. I live in an urban sprawl. Like living in an ant’s nest.

  2. I’ve been reading this web for a while now. And with post like this one, I can say it looks like russians are experts in abandoing amazing stuff, from vehicles and machinery to entire towns.

    • People didn’t abandon these places “just for lulz”.
      Right after USSR collapse, a lot of factories\enterprises\etc “died”, because they had no money anymore. Mines died = Mine towns died. The same thing is here I guess.
      Use you brain.

  3. I know Russia is a huge country, but it is just amazing to see just how many places are abandoned. And indeed, the water tower is neat.

  4. This is sad but a beautiful post. Great Photos. I’d love to see them all. Thanks.

    730 years of existance and some $#!+s comes along and thinks (s)he has to tags it. That’s horrible.

    I hope all these places can be preserved and protected.

  5. It is sad that EnglishRussia posts pictures of abandoned places very very often, so people begin to think that EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE is abandoned here…

    • Aw don’t worry about the people who don’t read enough to know better. I guess the admin. thinks these posts are interesting to an audience. Amer. has lots of abandoned places; hence, that’s why there is a “Rust Belt”. Penn., W.V., Ohio, Ken., Mich., etc. has loads of abandoned places. The move of manufacturing overseas by amoral capitalists in the 1960s-1980s devastated these areas.

  6. In the Great Plains of the U.S. small towns are also being abandoned rapidly. Nat. Geographic mag had a story last Summer (2010) full of abandoned places pics.

  7. Hello,

    I have been reading your blog for a longer time. I just have to say that I really love it. It is a good chance to peak into the neighbor country in East. Keep on the good work and don’t quit! 🙂

    Best regards from Finland.

  8. I’m with Jessica as well. This is a new important place for me. I’ve found lots of such places. These are how I come to know things. How some of us regard our lonely places is just as revealing as how we regard our livelier places. I look, and read, for myself.

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