An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

In former times it was a very beautiful estate of one merchant in Yaroslavl. After the hurricane in August, 2010 it was damaged and heaped up with trees. Let’s have a look at the remains of this relict of wood architecture.

A lighthouse on the way to the estate.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

Old vodka bottles.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

Near the lighthouse there is a special school for juvenile delinquents.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

The signs are handmade.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

“No trespassing. Lumbering”

An Interesting History Of One Estate

A brutal abandoned tractor.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

The road is very picturesque.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

And here is the estate itself.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

The history of the house began in 1865, when it was noticed at a fair in Nizhniy Novgorod by Sorokin merchant, and was immediately bought.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

Then it was taken to pieces and rafted to Yaroslavl.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

The house was assembled back only in 1868.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

But 50 years later, all merchants were dispossessed, and the estate was claimed as a rest home for proletariat and working class.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

After the war it became a kind of little summer camp for children.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

In the 90-s the house was abandoned, plundered by local vacationers. In 2000’s the territory was bought by a building company, but it still remains the same.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

Some other consequences of the hurricane.

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

An Interesting History Of One Estate

via ZIZIS

8 thoughts on “An Interesting History Of One Estate”

  1. What a shame, look at the timbers they used when they built this place. It’s too bad they opened a JD center there, I imagine business is good.

  2. There’s yer marxism/socialism for ya! You have something they want, they just come and take it, you get nothing for it. Which is fine, IF you’re on the receiving end. People only find out how bad it is, when they’re the ones being taken FROM.

    That’s the whole allure of it, I’m going to take something from that rich guy over there, and give it to you, because he has more than he should. You think Yipee!! I’m getting something for free!!!

    Then you find out how little you really get because you have to “share” with millions of other people.

    Then they start taking from YOU too, because now YOU have more than you should, because the whole system is failing, and not enough is being produced to keep the people at the top, living the high life AT the top.

    It’s a system that simply can NOT work in with large numbers of people. It simply goes against human nature. Somebody, will always, have a bit more than somebody else. And it’ll be something you can’t take away like a smile.

    Once the misery sets in, people don’t want to work any more. Why should they? It’s just taken from them and given to somebody else anyway. And those living off of others… Why should *I* work? I have a government (taxpayer) provided house, I get enough money for beer/vodka… why work?

      • I have a degree in economics, including post-grad courses in comparative economic systems (of which Communism is only one).

        The previous poster has it right, and the same problem exists in many systems. Things cease to function when enough people realize they can vote themselves “free” stuff, whether it be housing, food, wages, health care, etc.

        Eventually, the workers realize they’re better off not working and letting someone else pay the bills.

  3. It is truly a shame that it was abandoned even before the hurricane. I can still see some of the decorative woodworks going for good money as wall decorations in America though. Hopefully someone has the sense to salvage them instead of simply destroying them completely.

  4. Wait, wait, wait. STOP!!!!!

    This is a photographic essay on the heartbreaking loss of a remarkable historic house, one which any nation would have been pleased to designate historic. Just look at the amazing Islamic-inspired woodwork, a delightful fusion of a Russian Fairytale Palace and traditional wooden architecture of this region.

    The UNESCO World Heritage listing includes many similar treasures. This is not about this or that governmental philosophy. LOOK at what we are losing, our national and regional identities as recorded in our architecture and our arts. If we cannot stick to the subject, and preserve what is most important, our arts, our architecture, our environment, which define OUR LIVES and OUR FUTURES, none of the rest matters. Without our past, without learning from our present, we have no future.

Leave a Comment