“Chernobyl-2” – a Pearl of the Past

Here, in the main building, was a fire as you can see

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On the roof

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A big control room of a cooling arrangement

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Check-point

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Sauna

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Visual agitation at the training ground

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Barrack

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Warehouse

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Bomb shelter

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Remains of a radar set P-14 “Lena”

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Underground bunker for its equipment

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They will never be restored or maintained. In fact they haven’t been dismantled yet but it’s a matter of time, till they find technologies and money.

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Frankly speaking, the construction is easier to be exploded

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But here explosions are forbidden because they may cause a slight earthquake

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So they will need special cranes to dismantle them, such as ‘Demag’ for example. Generally, expensive equipment, many people and a lot of money are required.

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Inside of the hardware system

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And a military camp

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25 thoughts on ““Chernobyl-2” – a Pearl of the Past”

  1. 8rd!
    That’s Duga-3, otherwise known as Woodpecker.
    It is a large over-the-horizon radar.
    http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/Russian_Bases_Woodpecker_Duga_Radar_Ukraine.html

  2. If I recall correctly, the unit located in Chernobyl was the Duga-3. It was named “the russian woodpecker”, as it was a repetitive noise jamming in lots of radio frequencies.

    Amazing souvenir from the cold war…

  3. Should be fairly easy to bring it down. Just cut the bracing (the angled parts), then attach a steel cable to the top (or do this part first!) and then use a bulldozer to just pull it down.

    Should think about collecting some of those signs and posters. I’d expect them to go up in value over the years.

  4. Pity GSC Gameworld partially screwed up this part creating STALKER SoC, by replacing this Duga by 5 simple antennas… Later on Clear Sky they’ve brought it in, but without any usable background right into the imaginary city of Limansk…
    At least on Call of Pripyat they’ve put in the main building, and the familarity is impressive, though ingame version is not as messy as the reallife counterpart. But watching these pics on this blog made me want to play STALKER again… 😀

  5. On September 17 1939 the treacherous Soviets ruthlessly attacked Poland, already under attack by Germans. Russians signed a pact with Germans to cut Poland in half and share the loot. Poland was once again betrayed and attacked by Soviet Russia. What followed was 50+ years of effective occupation by Russians in terms of communist government and presence of foreign army in the territory of Poland. May the memory of this hideous deed never be forgotten, in spite of continued attempts by Russians to rewrite history. Long live Poland!

  6. To see a huge impressive structure like that abandoned and destroyed, makes me feel very sad. I think dozens of people passing by and having fun destroying all the equipments. For what? Why not just keep it intact?
    In fact, makes me want to play STALKER again. Love that game.

  7. Old electric relays commonly have gold contacts where they meet. If that’s true here, there’s thousands of dollars waiting for a pair of tinsnips.

  8. Hi, can anyone with antenna elaectromagnetics background explain the peculiar zeppelin-like shape of the antenna endings ? I recently visited Odessa and noticed exactly the same shape antenna endings (yet much smaller) on top of a public building in the main historic square. Anyone any idea ?

  9. What an amazing place! Brilliant photos, I only wish I could come over and take a close look.
    Regarding the shape of the Ae’s the wide cage was probably to give the system a wide bandwidth over a range of frequencies. The circular ends are rounded to minimise corona (These being at the voltage nodes). I wonder what the radiated power was.

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