Museum of Long-Range Aviation

Museum of Long-Range Aviation

Dyagilevo is an air base in Ryazanskaya region, located 11 km to the west from Ryazan. There is the Distant Aviation Museum on the base where we will travel today.

Let’s start our excursion from TU-95, the soviet strategic missile bomber, one of the fastest planes that became a symbol of the Cold War. Russian Bear was made to attack anytime of a day, at any weather.

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TU-95 planes have the NK-12 engines, which is the most powerful in the world nowadays.

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TU-95 is one of the loudest planes in the world and can be disclosed even by submarines but it’s not crucial during assault and battery.

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Defensive equipment consists of 23-mm aviation canons.

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Bomb-load of TU-95 can reach 12000kg.

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There is TU-95MS right next to it; this is TU-95 modification which is the foundation of the Russian strategic Air Force. It carries cruise missile H-55.

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M-4, “Bizon” by NATO classification- the first reactive strategic bomber came in to the army. It was made at the same time with TU-95 but it is faster with the smaller range.

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One of the most beautiful planes with the maximum take-off weight of 181.5 tons, and the speed of 947 km/h on the height of 6700m.

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In this museum there is M-4 modification.

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TU-22, Blackfire is the distant supersonic missile bomber with the changeable wing geometry.

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Air vents with the vertical wedge (the horizontal one on TU-22M3) are located on each side of fuselage.

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And this is TU-22M2, first was made in Kazanskij aviation plant with its first flight performed on the 7th of May 1973.

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TU-16, “Barsuk” by NATO codification is the soviet twin-engine, reactive, distant missile bomber.

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During decades TU-16 has been the essential plane in aviation component of USSR strategic forces. TU-16 of sea aviation did monitoring and convoying of USA aircraft-carriers tasks in the whole northern hemisphere. During Afghanistan War TU-16 was used not once to bomb Afghanistan territory. Lots of new modern equipment was put on the plane and in early 90’s it was withdrawn from the army.

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IL-76 “Iskrennij” is the Soviet military transport plane, which is the essential one in military transportation of Russia and Ukraine.

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Photo credits: 1

21 thoughts on “Museum of Long-Range Aviation”

  1. Lovely photos of some great looking russian birds. Still, I’d rather see some lovely photos of some great looking Russian “birds”

    Cheerio!

  2. “TU-95 planes have the NK-12 engines, which is the most powerful in the world nowadays”

    -Yes, it’s the most powerful TURBOPROP engine, but not necessarily the most powerful JET engine

    “Air vents with the vertical wedge”

    – They are AIR INTAKES, not vents

  3. Back during the cold war when I was stationed in (*undisclosed location*) we would be subject to a “Bear Scare” every once in a while when one of these would get too close to our airspace.

  4. Greath pictures, I assume it will be very difficult to visit this museum as a none Russian (with the airbase nearby). Does anybody know if this is possible? I did manage to get into Monino with help of Russian friends.

  5. Very interesting.

    I don´t knew why, but this make me think about the possiblitys of seriously go further into space will be a logical next step, after all we went up in the air for more than 200 years ago, and those metal beasts are as i guess the culmen of our last decenniums of fine science and military precicion in the skye. Actually not so far as one can think goes with something similar to those up into teh space and away to new locations when the earth is to overpopulated (it is already som there is clearly a desperate need for more living space today) i can imagine my self (for example) locking uot of that plastic window behind the aluminium alloy rivets and se stars gzing back on my face and consider about that i will probably newer return to this planet but help building something elsewhere far away that can be a furter place to live on as we does here on another place in next generation.
    I dont knew if that will become true (probably nit as long as i liwe) but at least i hope that we will continue loock forward but learn about our history to build the future and make it confortable.

  6. Today, i actually live in the area of what once was a former military airfield much are left of that former activity and, some of the planes (a heli and a pair of old interceptors for example) are salvaged as displays at a local museum.
    Wery interesting to compare those aircrafts to ours.

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