Russian Guide for Tag Removals

Remove cloths tag in shops, from Russia

In Russia they sometimes publish some things in blogs that might be considered unethical to publish in some places. For examples this is a guide for removal a magnetic security tag you can meet in dress stores. Person who published this says it’s just for fun, or for using in actual store or just to use if you got the item and they forgot to remove the tag in the store so you can do it by yourself. It’s kind of his disclaimer.

So if to get back to the guide all one would need is

…is a very strong magnet. “In everyday life the most strong magnet you can get is the magnet from the computer’s Hard Drive. You can usually get one non-working disk from some computer store who sells used hardware. It would cost you dollar or two”, says the author.

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“The magnet itself is glued to the surface – you need to insert the blade between the magnet and the disk and then you have a magnet!”

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“One magnet might be not enough, you gotta get a few of such for best results. But beware – anything magnetically-sensitive like credit card or small electronic devices should be taken away from it – or it can be easily harmed”

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“So when you have the magnets put them one to another (you can see on the picture)”

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“Now take the item.”

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“That’s NOT right way to put it”

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Remove cloths tag in shops, from Russia 8

“And that’s right way to do it”

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“Now just remove the tag together with the magnet”

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“That’s it, you got the job done.”

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“Also if one side of the magnet didn’t do the trick, use another one, the tags have different polarity.”

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Remove cloths tag in shops, from Russia 14

via it-romance

41 thoughts on “Russian Guide for Tag Removals”

  1. This has been known in the US for years.The tag system is defeatable as is the magnetic strip system…you just have to know how.I spent a lot lunch hours trying to figure out how people were stealing from the big box hardware store I was a manager at.It is amazing and at the same time sad that they were so clever and yet so crooked at the same time.Remember the ink tags they had at clothing stores?..there was a way to thwart those to..

  2. this is useful, my dad once bought something where they left the ink tag on. He managed to remove it with a hacksaw…

  3. I am at serious doubt this would work for the tags used in local Tesco. Some time ago, I bought a jacket there and only after bringing it home, I realized the cashier did not remove the tag which, surprisingly, did not cause any alarm in the shop.
    I put the bloody thing into a vice, smashed it with a hammer – it just would not fall apart, the plastic was surprisingly flexible. Only the trusty angle grinder did the job.
    What I found inside was a grooved pin with a Seeger ring which I had to bend free with two pairs of pliers.
    I do not believe it would be possible to remove the thing with a magnet, no matter how strong.

  4. How do you think they do it in the store? Ever seen that plate they place it on? (you know, the one with the magnet in it?) Or does your local Tesco use an angle grinder?

    • No, they use a special key which they insert into a very narrow slot located between the halves of the tag.
      The Seeger ring is not the “normal” C-shaped Seeger ring used e.g. for bearings etc.
      If they use a magnet, then I think they use it to de-magnetize the metal foils located inside the flag. I am inclined to believe the foils are some sort of condenser, but I am loath to google the principle of their function.

  5. Dearest angella,

    Please pay special attention to the technique illustrated in this post. After we are married I may put you to work shoplifting from nice shops in Western nations, in order to help raise money for jihad.

    You have a great fighting spirit, so I know you will make an excellent thief. If you are caught it will be even better, because you can scream “discrimination” and get big checks from the store owner.

    Yours in creative fundraising,
    M. Ahmadinejad
    V.P. Fundraising, Jihad Inc.

  6. I would have needed that trick once. My wife bought a jacket from a fine boutique and the clerk forgot to remove the alarm tag. She didn’t notice until we had to go to a party in a hurry and the clock was already after closing time.

    You can imagine she was a little upset, either not to wear an expensive jacket in a party which the thing was originally bought for or look like a thief 😀

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    • yes you can. it will erase the data on the magstripe (brown/black stripe on the back). try it with your credit card and then go to the store to buy something

  8. Pingback: Nategorga’s Blog » Russians find out how to remove clothing security tags (Who else?)
  9. No, they use a special key which they insert into a very narrow slot located between the halves of the tag.
    The Seeger ring is not the “normal” C-shaped Seeger ring used e.g. for bearings etc.
    If they use a magnet, then I think they use it to de-magnetize the metal foils located inside the flag. I am inclined to believe the foils are some sort of condenser, but I am loath to google the principle of their function.

  10. I am at serious doubt this would work for the tags used in local Tesco. Some time ago, I bought a jacket there and only after bringing it home, I realized the cashier did not remove the tag which, surprisingly, did not cause any alarm in the shop.
    I put the bloody thing into a vice, smashed it with a hammer – it just would not fall apart, the plastic was surprisingly flexible. Only the trusty angle grinder did the job.

  11. I am at serious doubt this would work for the tags used in local Tesco. Some time ago, I bought a jacket there and only after bringing it home, I realized the cashier did not remove the tag which, surprisingly, did not cause any alarm in the shop.
    I put the bloody thing into a vice, smashed it with a hammer – it just would not fall apart, the plastic was surprisingly flexible. Only the trusty angle grinder didthe job

  12. I am at serious doubt this would work for the tags used in local Tesco. Some time ago, I bought a jacket there and only after bringing it home, I realized the cashier did not remove the tag which, surprisingly, did not cause any alarm in the shop.
    I put the bloody thing into a vice, smashed it with a hammer – it just would not fall apart, the plastic was surprisingly flexible. Only the trusty angle grinder did the job.
    What I found inside was a grooved pin with a Seeger ring which I had to bend free with two pairs of pliers.
    I do not believe it would be possible to remove the thing with a magnet, no matter how strong.

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