An Old Mine in Siberia

Old Russian mine 1

This guy got inside an abandoned mine in Siberia, the place where probably not one but a few generations of political prisoners worked hard their way to freedom deep inside frozen land of Russian North. He got some cool photos back from there!

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via redbook.ru

34 thoughts on “An Old Mine in Siberia”

  1. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,

    We are sending you these sex toys to use on your gay friends. Don’t forget to send us some oil back!

    Bye,
    America.

  2. Yes, amazing and beautiful shots. But I would have wanted to get out of there as soon as possible because the roof is going to collapse imminently.

    And if there are any structures or people on the ground above these mines they are going to be lost in a giant sinkhole.

    And to think that there must be dozens of these abandoned mines rotting away all across Siberia…

    If there is a Higher Power, I hope he or she showed mercy to the thousands of people who have dies working in such circumstances all over the world…

    • “the roof is going to collapse”
      – maybe. the surrounding rock may also be stable. over time the rock will flake off and fill the tunnel. lightly tapping the ceiling of an abandoned mine will tell you whether it’s safe. if the roof in front of you – unless you have a death wish never tap directly over your head – sounds hollow, the rock is “loose”. a hard bang is often enough to bring the loose rock down.

      “above these mines they are going to be lost in a giant sinkhole”
      – Butte, MT has 3500-10000 miles of tunnels under it but is considered safe (see http://www.miningmuseum.org/faq.html), although killer sinkholes did occur when the area was being actively mined.

      “there must be dozens of these abandoned mines rotting away all across Siberia”
      – North America has thousands or tens of thousands of old mines. I remember going camping in the permafrost zone of northern Manitoba. when you needed ice to cool your beer you just needed to canoe to the nearest old gold mine and chip off enough ice from outside the mouth. all mines eventually fill with water. in the permafrost zone the water will turn to ice; over time the ice will expand out of the mouth of the mine.

      “…the thousands of people who have dies working in such circumstances all over the world”
      – my mother called her village in Ireland the “graveyard of Butte”. after the local copper mines were played out in the mid-nineteenth century, the young went from there to mining towns in the USA. many of the men who weren’t killed underground went back home in ill health and soon died. in contrast, the women often lived into their eighties or nineties. even with today’s advances in equipment, mining is still a dangerous occupation.

  3. Какой же тут нациналистический срачь идёт ))

    А фотки зачёдные ,красотища да и только

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