92 thoughts on “Another Day at Minus Sixty”

    • my keyword was kgb…wtf..haha

      In Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada, where i live, it’s -50 a lot… with wind and sometimes -60 with wind.. hell it’s -30 c right now.. so put that in your pipe and smoke it.. .this site is funny, we get the same conditions but they get EXTREME conditions, its crazy..

      anywho, neat

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      • Yes I agree with rafal and nikita, Lenin was a criminal, he was jewish and why were they favouring communism? Because they always found europe a hard place in the history and conflicted, europeans always kind of poked jews for being non-christian, or else too wealthy. So the idea of communism was an idea for them to be equal with everyone else but even more, enabled many of them to take highranking places in Russia, to murder millions of russian christians through gulags (work-prison camps). They also were successfull at destroying and banning religions in USSR.

        http://www.jewwatch.com/jew-occupiedgovernments-USSR.html

        According to Jew Watch website USSR was a “Jewish occupied country”

        http://seanbryson.com/articles/prop_masters.html

        Around 80% of the communist party after revolution was jewish and later in 1970s anti-jewish semitism was born because people figured out we had to have our own people in the party, but not for long, our people finally destroyed in 1991 what they had to put up and live up with before.
        Why did the Nazis hate communism so much? There was a communist revolution in Germany but it soon lost ground, how ever most of the german communists were again Jews.

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        • Yea the jews are responsible for everything bad that happened in the soviet union. Hell even everyting bad that happens in the whole world are caused by jews.

          Soon you will tell us that Stalin was also jewish. A man that planned to send all jews in Russia into internment camps only to be stopped by his own death. There were jews in the Soviet leadership, Molotovs wife for an example.

          But to blame jews for communism is just pure ignorance.

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          • “Soon you will tell us that Stalin was also jewish”

            Curious. You will laugh.

            The real surname of Stalin was Jugasvili. Which in Georgian means “Son of a Jew”.

            🙂

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            • ‘The brutality of the Stalinist regime is incontrovertible. The Jewish origin of this brutality, on the other hand is a mendacious claim. ‘
              From: http://www.holocaust-history.org/bolshevik-canard/

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        • I didn’t say all Jews, but it was their idea and at first the soviet government consisted 80% out of them, I am just curious why do you have those websites where it clearly says jews tried to destroy christianity in ussr.

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        • Comrade Mossad HQ, if you wanted to arrest me you wouldn’t ask me for my adress, my IP gives it all out anyway. As for you Kostya is dumb, oops!, did I just call meself dumb? So yes.. I just want to say that what I said may be the exaggerated but it’s roots are somehow based on truth, some kind of a holocaust did take place directed against Russian Christians and a lot of Jews were in charge until and even though Stalin also sent Jews to gulags, there were still jews that were in the party and who murdered people under Stalin. So to say that Jews murdered Soviets is not entirely true but there were many many more Russians who suffered from this than Jews. So should we just call Stalin and all those people including those Jews who executed the gulag system “Devils of the twentieth century” and send them all to hell?

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          • “Comrade Mossad HQ, if you wanted to arrest me you wouldnt ask me for my adress, my IP gives it all out anyway.”

            Yeah but, you know, like, this is the NEW Mossad and, we’ve had lots of down-sizing and turnover at HQ, and we spend most of our time in sensitivity and sexual-harrassment training and, like, we really don’t have TIME for all that “gathering” thing, so if you could just, like, send us your address, it would be a big help.

            Peace out,
            Mossad HQ
            “We’re looking out for you.” (new motto”

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          • You think “jewwatch” is bad? – try living in Latvia or Estonia, where anti-Semitism and xenophobia are not only condoned, but are in fact government-financed. In which other country would you find newly-erected monuments devoted to the SS butchers, or see public marches in honour of Waffen SS Legion?

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdT9UR7QL8U

            http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/679716.stm

            http://www.independent.co.uk/news/europe/estonia-accused-of-antisemitism-after-memorial-is-erected-to-ss-executioner-564715.html

            http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/c/c5/Lihula_monument.jpg

            Very disturbing, to say the least.

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            • Estonia and Amnesty

              An excess of conscience
              Dec 14th 2006
              From Economist.com

              Estonia is right and Amnesty is wrong

              Get article background

              AMNESTY International used to be an impartial and apolitical outfit, focused on the single burning issue of political prisoners. Your correspondent remembers its admirable letter-writing campaigns during the cold war on behalf of Soviet prisoners of conscience such as Jüri Kukk, an Estonian chemistry professor. He died in jail 25 years ago with the hope—then not widely shared—that his country’s foreign occupation would eventually end.

              It did. Since regaining independence in 1991 Estonia has become the reform star of the post-communist world. Its booming economy, law-based state and robust democracy are all the more impressive given their starting point: a country struggling with the huge forced migration of the Soviet era. The collapse of the evil empire left Estonia with hundreds of thousands of resentful, stranded ex-colonists, citizens of a country that no longer existed.

              Some countries might have deported them. That was the remedy adopted in much of eastern Europe after the second world war. Germans and Hungarians—regardless of their citizenship or politics—were sent “home” in conditions of great brutality.

              Instead, Estonia, like Latvia next door, decided to give these uninvited guests a free choice. They could go back to Russia. They could stay but adopt Russian citizenship. They could take local citizenship (assuming they were prepared to learn the language). Or they could stay on as non-citizens, able to work but not to vote.

              Put like that, it may sound fair. But initially it prompted howls of protest against “discrimination”, not only from Russia but from Western human-rights bodies. The Estonians didn’t flinch. A “zero option”—giving citizenship to all comers—would be a disaster, they argued, ending any chance of restoring the Estonian language in public life, and of recreating a strong, confident national identity.

              They were right. More than 100,000 of the Soviet-era migrants have learnt Estonian and gained citizenship. In 1992, 32% of the population had no citizenship. Now the figure is 10%.

              In 1990, before the final Soviet collapse, your correspondent tried to buy postage stamps in Tallinn using halting Estonian. The clerk replied brusquely, in Russian, “govorite po chelovecheski” (speak a human language). That was real discrimination. Estonians were unable to use their own language in their capital city. Now that’s changed too.

              Reasonable people can disagree about the details of the language law, about the right level of subsidies for language courses, and about the rules for gaining citizenship. Nowhere’s perfect. But Estonia’s system is visibly working. It is extraordinarily hard to term it a burning issue for an international human-rights organisation.

              Yet that is what Amnesty International has tried to make of it. It has produced a lengthy report, “Linguistic minorities in Estonia: Discrimination must end”, demanding radical changes in Estonia’s laws on both language and citizenship.

              Amnesty’s report echoes Kremlin propaganda in a way that Estonians find sinister and offensive

              The report is puzzling for several reasons. It is a bad piece of work, ahistorical and unbalanced. It echoes Kremlin propaganda in a way that Estonians find sinister and offensive. But most puzzling of all, it is a bizarre use of Amnesty’s limited resources. Just a short drive from Estonia, in Belarus and in Russia, there are real human rights abuses, including two classic Amnesty themes: misuse of psychiatry against dissidents, and multiple prisoners of conscience. Yet the coverage of these issues on the Amnesty website is feeble, dated, or non-existent.

              Amnesty seems to have become just another left-wing pressure group, banging on about globalisation, the arms trade, Israel and domestic violence. Regardless of the merits of their views—which look pretty stale and predictable—it seems odd to move to what is already a crowded corner of the political spectrum. To save Jüri Kukk and other inmates of the gulag, people of all political views and none joined Amnesty’s campaigns. That wouldn’t happen now.

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            • Baltic borders and the war

              May 5th 2005
              From The Economist print edition

              THE fighting stopped 60 years ago, but the war still produces lively rows. Estonia and Lithuania are boycotting next week’s shindig in Moscow. Latvia’s president, Vaira Vike-Freiberga, is going only to question Russia’s interpretation of history. This is as follows. The Baltic three were annexed in 1940 by the Soviet Union “according to international law at the time”; then conquered by the Nazis; and then liberated by the heroic Red Army.

              For the Balts, this is topsy-turvy. Far from being legal, their annexation stemmed from the 1939 Nazi-Soviet pact, which divided Europe between the two. The Red Army’s arrival in 1945 was less a liberation than the replacement of one murderous occupation by another. If anything, the Soviet one was worse (though not for Baltic Jews). The re-establishment of pre-war independence in 1991 was a miracle, not a catastrophe.…

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            • Come down man, do you know, that there are more skinheads today in Russia than in Europe and USA? Estonians and latvians are not nazis, and if some of our ancestors did fight against communists in the WW2, they did it because Stalins regime sent innocent women children and men to death in Siberia. Newly erected monuments are for those men who had the guts to fight back the agressor, thay had no other option than to join the german army, because during the first Soviet occupation the soviets destroyed our army.

              peace!

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        • Maybe the soviet system was good at telling a biased perspective but it wasn’t bad at teaching and making good solid mathematicians and physicists.

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  1. Those temperatures would be hard on a car. I wouldn’t think you could get one to start at that temp without warming the block first. Anyone know?

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    • When it was -30 C had no problem, started as good as in summer. As far as I know it’s harder for diesel engines, especially old ones.

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    • As a general rule, no, you can’t start a car on it’s own at that temperature – especially not if it’s a diesel engine.

      Although I doubt that it’s that cold in all of these pictures… -50 C tends to “peel” skin from your face and hurt your respitory tracts (even if you’re used to it), so I doubt that even Russians would be outside at -50 without something covering their faces.

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      • I’d challenge your doubts. The lowest I experienced was -48C. It wasn’t a big issue to withstand that being outside for reasonably short periods (like half an hour or so). One just needs keep his mouth shut, use nose for breathing and better through woollen scarf or mitten (see a woman on photo 9).

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        • I’ll answer your challenge:

          Half an hour isn’t a very long time – if you’re out on your regular work-day, and you have to either rely on public transportation or take the chance of your car not starting, I think that you would prepare yourself for a longer time outside than just half an hour…

          And since that one woman is the ONLY person in these pictures that’s covered their mouth/nose at all, I’d bet that it really isn’t -50 C, at least not in the pictures that have pedestrians in them.

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          • Wooshkaboom,

            I don’t disagree with you – it’s perfectly possible it’s not actually -50C on those photos. What I just want to say from my past experience living in South Siberia life in the cities doesn’t stop at temperatures below -40C. Not so many as usual but there still are people and cars on the streets outside. Moreover, I recently saw a TV reporting about low temps (-50C and below) from that region – the picture didn’t differ from what we see on the photos here.

            By the way, climate in Finland (now I live nearby – Pietari) is a bit milder than in Siberia due to sea proximity. However, in Finland it is harder to withstand low temps due to higher humidity. It is much drier in Siberia. Subjectively -50C in Finland and -50C in Siberia would be felt differently. In Finland it would be killing, in Siberia – hard but doable.

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          • Wooshkaboom,

            I don’t disagree with you – it can perfectly be possible that it’s not -50C on the photos. What I want to say is that from my past experience living in South Siberia life doesn’t stop in cities at temps below -40C. Not so many but there still are people and cars outside.

            Moreover, I recently saw TV reporting about low temps (-50C and below) from that region and the picture was not different from what we see on the photos here.

            By the way, climate in Finland (now I live nearby – Pietari) is milder than in Siberia due to sea proximity. In Finland it is harder to withstand low temps due to higher humidity. It is much drier in Siberia. Subjectively, -50C in Finland and -50C in Siberia would be felt differently – killing in Finland, hard but doable in Siberia.

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          • This is third time I’m trying to post same comment – didn’t work out previous two times. So I’m sorry if it appears three time later on.

            Wooshkaboom,

            I don’t disagree with you – it can perfectly be possible that it’s not -50C on the photos. What I want to say is that from my past experience living in South Siberia life doesn’t stop in cities at temps below -40C. Not so many but there still are people and cars outside.

            Moreover, I recently saw TV reporting about low temps (-50C and below) from that region and the picture was not different from what we see on the photos here.

            By the way, climate in Finland (now I live nearby – Pietari) is milder than in Siberia due to sea proximity. In Finland it is harder to withstand low temps due to higher humidity. It is much drier in Siberia. Subjectively, -50C in Finland and -50C in Siberia would be felt differently – killing in Finland, hard but doable in Siberia.

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          • This is forth attempt.

            This is third time I’m trying to post same comment – didn’t work out previous two times. So I’m sorry if it appears three times later on.

            Wooshkaboom,

            I don’t disagree with you – it can perfectly be possible that it’s not -50C on the photos. What I want to say is that from my past experience living in South Siberia life doesn’t stop in cities at temps below -40C. Not so many but there still are people and cars outside.

            Moreover, I recently saw TV reporting about low temps (-50C and below) from that region and the picture was not different from what we see on the photos here.

            By the way, climate in Finland (now I live nearby – Pietari) is milder than in Siberia due to sea proximity. In Finland it is harder to withstand low temps due to higher humidity. It is much drier in Siberia. Subjectively, -50C in Finland and -50C in Siberia would be felt differently – killing in Finland, hard but doable in Siberia.

            Reply
    • Rarely does one find a block heater on a car here. Why? I’m told it’s because some people will steal the electrical extension cord that connects the car to the power grid.

      It is more common to see people building small fires underneath their cars or trucks engines on cold days.

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  2. in Alaska, they park all the cars with the engins on in from of the house the whole day

    I saw a report once, there is sometimes -70 Celsius, once you stop the engine, you never start again outside, only in heated garages

    but, there no one will steal your car, not like in Russia

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  3. “Although I doubt that it’s that cold in all of these pictures… -50 C tends to “peel” skin from your face and hurt your respitory tracts (even if you’re used to it), so I doubt that even Russians would be outside at -50 without something covering their faces.”

    in the army we had one camp which last about 3 days, it was steady -42 celsius basicly all the time… man that was so friggin’ cold,hrr. yeah esp. after some running around ( carrying back-bag full of supplies + stuff ). I could say that my lungs really hurt.
    I don’t about freezing your eyes, but you have to keep moving all ( no sweating, it makes things even worse ) the time or your legs and hands will freeze. I don’t recall feeling any freezing in my eyes ( although it wasn’t windy weather at all, just so friggin’ cold )

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  4. I remember being in red square one time and it was so cold my camera wouldn’t even work. Plus it sucked trying to get a cab in pre capitalist russia.

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  5. Well, I guess I wont complain about it being cold here in Arizona! (40F for a low)
    Man, I cant imagine even functioning in weather like that.

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  6. Ah… I live in a country where the average temperature is 25degC, and now, during summer, it peaks to about 30-32degC.

    Heh… try this nice experiment: pour boiling water in a cup, go outside, throw it up in the air as high as you can. What happens? 🙂

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  7. в Якутске когда -50 -60 ебнуло трубы отопления полопались, и ни один местный житель не пожаловался на обморожения 🙂

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  8. “in Alaska, they park all the cars with the engins on in from of the house the whole day”

    Good to know everybody helps with global warming, so these pics will soon be history gone by.

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  9. Maybe the soviet system was good at telling a biased perspective but it wasn’t bad at teaching and making genius mathematicians and physicists.

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    • But then again, countries like the UK and the USA have ATTRACTED more genius mathematicians and physicists than any other country in the world… including some of the very best, like Tesla and Einstein.

      Man becomes smart -> man leaves his own country and goes to live in the USA or the UK… think about it. 😉

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  10. Those photos might be two years old, but here is the current forecast for Ojmjakon in Siberia, the coldest permanently inhabited place on the planet. It won’t get above -41C in the next week, and it’s -58C right now.

    Why do people live there?

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    • On the weather channel website Ojmjakon was -68 deg F today, and the current condition was “Smoke”

      -68 deg F and SMOKE is the current condition! Dear God, that must make it hard to get up in the morning!

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  11. About cars… it seems that most of them right-handed (from Japan), and the same cars also used in Australia at more high tempratures (I think twice higher)… On second photo you can see Toyota Chaser (or maybe Mark II, that the same series JZX90/GX90, anyway it’s backlight can be found on another photo), and Toyota Estima. On others you can see a lot of models of Russian cars from GAZ, UAZ and VAZ, and right-handed vehicles: Toyota Land Cruiser, Nissan Patrol (maybe not), Toyota Carina three versions (European name was the same, but have different view, at current time produced car for Europe&others named Avensis), and Mazda 626 Japan version. All cars was produced before 2000. Japanese cars was especially made for japaneese (native models), and never export to other countries through official ways.

    From my own expirience… I can start engine of my Toyota Chaser at -38 degrees Celcium, without any special works before. My friend do the same with US produced Mazda 626, but, he was installed larger accumulator.

    P.S. We are using yours salvage cars… so be careful with them 🙂

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  12. everyone’s wearing a mink coat but i can’t see a single peta activist with cans of red paint
    maybe they are not that devoted and it’s only comfortable for them to insult rich ppl on high streets, lol

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    • Genuine fur is the only thing that will keep your butt alive at those temps. Also, these people are wearing the fur out of necessity, not just because they’re rich and they think it’s fashionable.

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    • These people are wearing the fur coats because they’re a necessity at these temps, nothing else will keep you warmer. People who just wear them strictly for fashion are the ones peta goes after, and rightly so.

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  13. Jesus, -50C temp is brutal. I’ve had a couple low temps of -26C or so over the past week. About 10 years ago we had about -50C windchill but the temp was only about -40C. I wonder why it gets so foggy at that cold of a temp. Is that common?

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  14. Sure looks cold, I really wondered whether people could survive in these extreme temperatures..but I was in Bucharest over Christmas with -15 and it actually wasn’t bad.

    So wearing the right clothes would definitely help.

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  15. My god, it’s realy intimidating cold.. But nice pictures, good job. As you can see, visibility is not fair for traffic and warm living, and it is safe to say about this town – exotica with -50C 🙂
    P.s. Eugene- if you was born there, why are your feet still frozen every time? You should be used to such weather ;P

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  16. The world would be such a better place without the russians in it.

    Threaten Norway to invade it.
    Threaten almost all ex USSR colonies with war and a cut in the gas trade.
    I wish the 3rd WW happened and those Americans wiped you off the world surface in a very nuclear way. At least they go and change regimes with war, not just invade countries and claim it as their own.

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  17. I am glad I went to Russia in the summer.I was sweting during the day time.I wondered why there are 2 windows and 2 balcony doors to open in the pretty womans apartment I stayed in.Now I know why.

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  18. well, its really Yakutsk, look on map, its really far from Moscow.

    And yes, its really -50 in winter. Not so bad becase there is little wind. But in summer there is +35c – +40c degrees. Wonderful country,I really miss Yakutia.

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  19. I usually dont take time to ever make comments on a blog but I have to say I would really be doing you a grave disservice if I didnt comment. This post has most definitely opened my eyes. Thank you so much for writing it.

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