USSR at the End of 80s

Moscow at the end of 80s 1

We continue to publish historical series of photos showing life of Soviet people in different decades of the USSR times. For this once here comes the pictures of Russian streets at the end of 80s.

Pepsi first time in the USSR on the picture above.

See also:
Moscow Hotel “Russia”, Nowadays
Moscow at 80-s.
Moscow in the 60-s and 70-s
Moscow 1967
Moscow Decorated For Soviet Holidays, 1932
Moscow 1927
Prophetic Postcards Back From 1914
Moscow Flood at 1908
Moscow 1890

Moscow Now and Then
Moscow. The Past and the Present

USSR in the 70-s, part 1
USSR in the 70-s, part 2
USSR in the 70-s, part 3
USSR in the 60-s
USSR in the 60-s
Photos From Soviet Russia

Moscow at the end of 80s 2

Moscow at the end of 80s 3

Moscow at the end of 80s 4

Moscow at the end of 80s 5

Moscow at the end of 80s 6

Moscow at the end of 80s 7

Moscow at the end of 80s 8

Moscow at the end of 80s 9

Moscow at the end of 80s 10

Moscow at the end of 80s 11

Moscow at the end of 80s 12

Moscow at the end of 80s 13

Moscow at the end of 80s 14

Moscow at the end of 80s 15

Moscow at the end of 80s 16

Moscow at the end of 80s 17

Moscow at the end of 80s 18

Moscow at the end of 80s 19

Moscow at the end of 80s 20

Moscow at the end of 80s 21

Moscow at the end of 80s 22

Moscow at the end of 80s 23

Moscow at the end of 80s 24

Moscow at the end of 80s 25

Moscow at the end of 80s 26

Moscow at the end of 80s 27

Moscow at the end of 80s 28

Moscow at the end of 80s 29

Moscow at the end of 80s 30

Moscow at the end of 80s 31

Moscow at the end of 80s 32

Moscow at the end of 80s 33

Moscow at the end of 80s 34

Moscow at the end of 80s 35

Moscow at the end of 80s 36

Moscow at the end of 80s 37

Moscow at the end of 80s 38

Moscow at the end of 80s 39

Moscow at the end of 80s 40

Moscow at the end of 80s 41

Moscow at the end of 80s 42

Moscow at the end of 80s 43

submitted by Stinger

68 thoughts on “USSR at the End of 80s”

    • I’m curious what you understand under freedom. I was born in 1990 in Ukraine so I didn’t experience that time. But I know of story’s from my family that in early 90’s people had really hard life, some of my family members were threatend because they made money legally. The west is explaining freedom as a democracy where you can vote and have free speech. I don’t care much for those things. If I write something bad about someone and publish it that person can sue me, I thought I was expressing my thougts? I see freedome more as litting a fire in the woods and go barbeque with family, or drink beer on the street, or fish without a license and actually take the catch home and cook it, and not carying my ID 24/7 in case a police men asks for it. All those things are illegal in the Netherlands (where I live now). So what do you understand under freedom? I think USSR had more (little) freedoms than the west if you look at it from my point of view.

  1. I was just a child back then, but I remember the Gorbachev times quite well. It really was an amazing time. For the first time soviet people started to smell freedom and gain at least some understanding about the world surrounding their soviet “paradise”. Some were very anxious to try out and experience all that the new found freedoms had to offer. From Pepsi and Cola to setting up small business (called Koperativi in those days). Others however, were not so enthusiastic. They looked at these changes with suspicion and to some extent fear. Fear of the unknown, fear of change. But whatever people thought of Perestroika or all the positive and negative aspects that came with it, it was still an incredibly exciting time…..

    And then came the 90’s. Good or Bad – very difficult question to answer. During that time russia was certainly the most free country in the world. But of course, with that freedom also came anarchy, crime and poverty. Personally, I loved the 90’s. Yes it was difficult. Yes they were immoral times. But I would willingly put up with these things yet again, just to experience the amazing freedoms of the 90’s.

    • agree!

      late eighties and early nineties kicked ass.
      most free and liberal period in russian history ever.

      smell of change in the air. positive excitement and a lot of bright hopes. expectations for peace, freedom, prosperity.

      now everything gradually returns to “normal” in russia. as if nothing of that has ever happened…

    • yeah censored news, like its not at all like that in the wonderful usa exept our censors are the conglomerats that own the media companies, the subsidiary military contractor, and the lobbyist paying off your congressman.

      and im pretty sure the collapse was from regans “out spend them” tactic, and what else are you gunna do when the neighbor across the street has 12000 bazookas pointed at your front door at all times????

      and as for communism only benifiting a few…what happend to the american dream where anybody can own a business, a house, have kids and be wealthy, and not have to depend on the government for a bail out like it was some sort of, oh i dont know, communist welfare office…..just food for thought

  2. I remember those times vaguely too, especially with the start of perestroika. I remember the 3000% inflation, I remember trying pepsi… and having to split an 8oz can with my brother and neighboring kids. I remember all the anti-semites coming out into the open. Good times indeed.

  3. Does anyone remember this crazy clairvoyant (think his name is Kashperovsky) who used hypnotize and “Heal” people via TV screens?

    Man – that guy still gives me nightmares. His eyes were absolutely terrifying! Does anyone know what happened to him?

    • I can assure you, he is still in business – the SAME business as 25 years ago. Recently he gave 2 “medical” sessions in Tallinn, Estonia. Nobody was allowed to film and he had high demands even for how he should look like while giving a quick interview for TV.

      • Does he live in Estonia now? Because, the wikipedia link that Dixieland has provided states that he has moved to US. Perhaps some americans could shine some light? John?

        • Hello Borris,
          The most recent information I could find was a ticket advertisement for several “sessions” by Mr. Kashpirovsky.
          Apparently he performed two sessions each in Los Angeles and San Diego back in April of this year.

          http://www.ticketsr.com/index.php?op=event&id=386

          If I find any more info I will pass it along.

          • Thanks John. Well, I guess he isn’t as popular as was in russia. And trust me, thats a good thing. At least your children can sleep at night. Honestly, no joke, this guy still gives me nightmares. There is something about his eyes…. Very spooky 🙁

  4. Too bad none of the pictures had any captions. Great pics tho.

    This pic looks like the location where Jason Bourne is shot at, in the second movie of the series.:
    http://englishrussia.com/images/moscow_end_of_80s/22.jpg

  5. I want those drink machines back!

    Where you have one glass cup everyone uses, and turn it over, press on it, and the machine washes it like a mini dishwasher.

    Just think how much aluminum and plastic could be saved!

  6. Grim. No one looked happy except perhaps the two children with the cat.

    And what is with the shabby uniforms on the soldiers? Long hair and holding cigarettes too! Put ’em all on charge!

  7. All of these photos (and ~99% of content on this site) are from Moscow; it would have been better if they included other cities as well.

  8. Nice pics, I’m in Western Australia and never been overseas let alone Moscow.

    Is it my imagination or is Russia a grubby and dirty place?

    I hardly ever see a picture of some place well maintained and clean…

    • “I hardly ever see a picture of some place well maintained and clean” – Ehm-hh-hmh… Surprising. So you have noticed that, haven’t you?

      “Russia a grubby and dirty place” – Well. Some prefer to call it “the Great Russia, The Third Rome”, which now is rising from her knees where it’s eternal enemy – the evil West – has forced it.

      Whatever you prefer…

      • and im pretty sure the collapse was from regans “out spend them” tactic, and what else are you gunna do when the neighbor across the street has 12000 bazookas pointed at your front door at all times????

        and as for communism only benifiting a few…what happend to the american dream where anybody can own a business, a house, have kids and be wealthy, and not have to depend on the government for a bail out like it was some sort of, oh i dont know, communist welfare office…..just food for thought

        • Pretty good…except they said they were from Australia. The American dream does not apply in Australia because it’s not our dream 😛

  9. No, it’s for the 28th Party Congress. (There’s four initials below it which, transliterated to Latin, mean KPSS, or Communist Party)

  10. nice set!
    brings back all those sweet memories of nasty Soviet architecture and design, LOL ! good times…

    you now think that you could easily build everything yourself and then start thinking how easy and cheap everything was….

    awwhh… euro standards are way better!

  11. Pingback: Cup Of Web
  12. Pingback: Das Kraftfuttermischwerk » Just my daily two cents
  13. Pingback: SebastianWetzel.org » Fotos der Sowjetunion Ende der 80er
  14. i think these photos are fascinating. as a child in the US i was taught basically that we were going to war with the USSR. nuclear war was a real threat.

    ‘top gun’ was considered high art, russians were always bad guys in movies.

    i think it is very sad and somehow touching to see the ordinary people…

    people do not hate, it is governments that teach them to… and make them go to war…

  15. Pingback: Tot el que es va perdre « Des del cim del Mamaiev
  16. I’ve really enjoyed the 1980’s photos, And the comments. I’m fascinated with history and have read quite a bit about the Soviet Union, Communism, the Bolshevick Revolution, etc. Reading the viewpoints of Russians who have experienced the changes in Russia from Perestroika to recent years is quite interesting.

Leave a Comment