70 thoughts on “The Matrix Goggles”

  1. I wonder if it would be very difficult to build a stereoscopic version of the goggles. Would it require a second processor, or would the single processor handle both image streams?

    Perhaps the effect filters may also be able to receive audio input from a microphone, or perhaps input from a music device such as an MP3 player. This might do things like shifting color pallets according to the audio frequencies in the environment.

    Also, beginning users may find it easier on the eyes to mix the real image with the effected image, to become accustomed to the effects.

  2. I saw this on the Russian site and my first thought after viewing the video was … Gee wouldn’t it be great if they also had a set of distorting earphones… Maybe some form of phase shifting .. Just a couple of mics, a $40 phase shifter from Guitar center and a set of headphones…. HEEEELLLLLLOOOOOO 60’s ….jegan

  3. I *WANT* a pair! 🙂 When/where can I get one, LOL.

    Add earbuds and you can experiment with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia

    P.s. The ASCII filter should add the streaking top-bottom brighter Katakana letters ala Matrix, the movie..

  4. http://ascii.dyne.org/

    HasciiCam makes it possible to have live ascii video on the web. It captures video from a tv card and renders it into ascii letters, formatting the output into an html page with a refresh tag, or in a live ascii window, or in a simple text file. It gives the possiblity to anybody that has a bttv card, a unix box and a cheap modem line to show live (h)ascii video can be viewed without any need for extra applications, plugins, java etc.

  5. http://ascii.dyne.org/

    HasciiCam makes it possible to have live ascii video on the web. It captures video from a tv card or webcam and renders it into ascii letters, formatting the output into an html page with a refresh tag, or in a live ascii window, or in a simple text file. It gives the possiblity to anybody that has a bttv card, a unix box and a cheap modem line to show live (h)ascii video can be viewed without any need for extra applications, plugins, java etc.

  6. wow, my anti-spam word is Vodka! Ruskies rock.

    Anyway, I can easily see a device like this being a huge help for people with Macular Degeneration, or to help deal with the sensory overload problems people with Autism have.

  7. How soon before someone develops a “happy product” filter as in Mark Osborne’s “More” video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo3mnXGbJlg

    plug
    (purchase at http://www.despair.com)
    /plug

  8. So, what do you get while viewing the ASCII-mation “Star Wars” thru these goggles set to ASCII mode? Does it turn the ASCII-mation back into live action? That would be a novel creation, indeed…

  9. if they could just make it smart enough so it applies image retouching instead of the filters.. everyone would look like a supermodel.

  10. I think this is fantastic! Just goes to show a very artistic innovation of what can be done with visual electronics. I agree this may have applications for the visually impaired also. Either way, Terminator Vision is cool.

  11. Now, if they’d add “x-ray vision”, I’d send Alexei and Aristarkh all the Rubles I’ve been saving up for Svetlana the mail-order bride since 2001.

  12. Is there version that have 2 cameras to process it to stereo image? (will have 2 separate displays for each eye)
    If the processor can handle 2x more processing for that. Just imagine 3D processed funky image! Must be exciting.

  13. IT is not as silly as you suggest. You can add targets, distance measures anything.
    Think how a cop could use it at dark, chasing some guy in a dark alley or a sniper…

  14. he invented a kids toy, that will get the company sued when a kid crosses the road, can judge distance and gets smacked by an 18 wheel rig going at 65 mph

  15. It’s called a “visual filter” as described in (Chapter 2 of the wearable computing textbook, http://wearcam.org/textbook.htm).

    Various visual filters, including ASCII art as well as a wearable face-recognizer that superimposes names on recognized faces have been already demonstrated in the mediated reality community more than 10 years ago, so I’m not sure what’s new about the embodiment shown here.

  16. This would be good for superhuman vision.

    You could make it so it would have headphones so you could translate what people are saying into different languages.

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