1 Photos of Peasant Life in Russian Empire

Photos of Peasant Life in Russian Empire

Posted on September 4, 2018 by tim


Some people these days dream they could live in different times, for example during the time of the Russian Empire, imaging themselves being counts, dukes or some other kind of “nobility”. However, over 80% of the Russian Empire’s population were peasants, and here are some photos of their life.  The first photo above is a peasant’s house in 1860.

Peasants making wooden spoons

A village near Nizhny Novgorod

Counts talk about the “common people” (Including count Leo Tolstoy, the writer – in the middle of the photo, with a white beard)

People having rest in the early 1900s

Peasants of Mokhovoe village during a Sunday prayer

A village gathering on Sakhalin island

1918, after the Revolution. The man with the rifle might be confiscating food

A village near Moscow

A village house near the end of 19th century

A church holiday, when you commemorate people who have died of causes other than natural causes, celebrated seven days after Easter.

1871

A house, 1890

The lives of village peasant people were not easy. It was much more easy for the people in such photos who usually hadn’t worked a day of their lives in the field or on other hard tasks. However, nostalgic tendencies are usually associated with such people.

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One Response to “Photos of Peasant Life in Russian Empire”

  1. Muzzlehatch says:

    In photo #12 the gunman, probably a Chekist, seems to be carrying an M1917 Enfield rifle, the American version of the British Enfield P14, chambered in 30-06 and the main rifle used by the US Expeditionary Forces in Europe, due to a shortage of Springfield rifles.
    With the exception of the architecture, the “peasants” could have been American farmers up to the Second World War, since many farms did not have electricity, running water or sewers, and used mules instead of tractors.

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