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3 Huge Toy Model of the Moscow City [photos]

Huge Toy Model of the Moscow City [photos]

Posted on February 28, 2018 by tim


If you travel to Moscow then you might look this thing. It’s a separate building that hosts a huge toyish model of Moscow in great detail. Stanislav went there and made some photos.

The thing located in Moscow Expo area “VDNHKH”. The entrance is free.

It’s inside an oval new building.

Some houses are yet on display and not yet installed into the grand model itself.

And here is the model. It’s really big – to see the Kremlin in the middle you’ll need some optics probably.

Belaruskiy railway station.

Beside the model there are info panels to learn more.

New Moscow mosque near Olympicsky stadium.

There are also screens around it so that you can zoom in any part of the model.

“Crystal” factory (red) and the Yauza river.

Sometimes they turn the lights on and it becomes even better.

This panel tells about the parks in Moscow. Also right now shows “Moscow bicycle ring” – bicycle path around the city.

Paveletsky railway station.

Also big screen shows how this model has been built.

Shukhov’s tower.

Lights make it more real.

Famous “Gorky Park”.

Krymsky bridge.

Foreign affairs ministry building.

The thing is pretty cool and Stanislav recommends everyone to visit it if you are in Moscow. Also his website is below:

via

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3 Responses to “Huge Toy Model of the Moscow City [photos]”

  1. Douglas says:

    Those thousands of huge slabs of apartment buildings are daunting. But how else can you cram a lot of people in a small space. Some apartment buildings never get any sunshine. At least you have many neighbors for friends. Its the surely is the irony of fate.

  2. somejoe says:

    What is the scale?

    • Douglas says:

      I read that this model is 1:400 scale… 70 sq.meters…the “VDNHKH” [Soviet era exhibitions hall]. wants to expand the model to an area more than 10 times what it is now…..it was started in the mid-1960s.

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