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37 Battlefield Debaltsevo

Battlefield Debaltsevo

Posted on February 23, 2015 by tim


There is a ceasefire in Donetsk and Lugansk region, as you might know. However, as they say before they have got the ceasefire agreement coined in the overnight session in Minsk they wanted to agree first on the status of this small town  Debaltsevo. Both parties were claiming that it is under their control and some say that the peace talks had to take so long because both parties were waiting for the news in the morning from the battlefield – if it was taken or not. Now when the agreement is enacted photographer has got into the former battlefield to get some photos of smashed tanks and other armored apparatus debris.

Here is for example something looking like a tank turret on the ground.

Pieces of canon. 

Landmines.

Tanks.

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37 Responses to “Battlefield Debaltsevo”

  1. hind says:

    The story is not exactly correct. After Minsk-2 ceasefire agreement, rebels refused to stop fighting and said, that it does not apply to Debalcewe (because Ukrainian troops had it under control) so they gathered heavy weapons (which were banned according to agreement) and attacked surrounded city. After heavy fight they won, and these photos were taken after that. They are not freedom fighters for me – if they keep only parts of the agreement which suit them – they are just terrorists, supported by Russian army.

    • Darkness_99 says:

      And how do we call the Ukrainian side, if they don’t follow the agreement, and keep shelling cities and killing civilians, like they did after Minsk-1? And many parts of Minsk-2 agreement… I simply don’t see, how Poroshenko will provide special status and give autonomy to Donetsk and Luhansk with the parliament full of those new paramilitary warlords and ultaranationalist freaks of all sorts. He will simply end up, like the previous president.

      • Alain says:

        Let’s the current “authorities” manage the Donetsk and Luhansk regions and hence help Ukraine get stronger without these derelict, backward-looking regions.

        That will be REAL fun, to see how Russia will manage that. And everybody would be happy : Donetsk, Luhansk and Ukrainians. But that’s not what the Russian masters of Donetsk and Luhansk want :) They want a weak Ukraine. That’s all they want. But they will not get it :)

        • Darkness_99 says:

          “Let’s the current “authorities” manage the Donetsk and Luhansk regions and hence help Ukraine get stronger without these derelict, backward-looking regions.”

          Hmm, Donetsk and Luhansk are looking backwards, and Kiev is marching forward, like in this 10000 torchlight procession on the night of the 1st of January.

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZL01jWwEmU

          Way to go, Ukraine!

          • Alain says:

            Backward is dreaming about a long-gone USSR dream. Kiev will definitely not provide them that. And I am sure Moscow will not, either…

            Now, as I tell you, I am 100% ok for Donbass being independent or Russian (with financial penalties for Russia in any cases, for the invasion, destructions, annexation of Crimea, etc.)

            And regarding Bandera, just expand a bit your sources of information. Nor Russia, nor Ukraine are fully right about him. The truth is in between.

    • Anton says:

      terrorists are those who use terrorism in the pursuit of political aims, so be careful with applying this term to those you have no idea of.

      debaltsevo was – and is – part of the donetsk people’s republic, and the rebels could not secure their borders unless it was freed from a large number of ukrainian troops that could use it as a bridgehead for a potential offensive. now, when the enemies lost their arsenals and troops there, donetsk is safer than before and kiev will be more likely to follow the minsk agreements.

      • Alain says:

        Well, in fact it is exactly what you say. But, indeed, they are not terrorists. Just Russian army. And, no, Debaltseve is NOT part of DNR (which does not exist, according to ALL countries in the world, including Russia) but part of Ukraine, (as internationally recognized).

        A COUNTRY DOES NOT INVADE ITS NEIGHBOUR WITHOUT UN MANDATE, WHATEVER THE REASONS. Remember that. Always…

    • Alain says:

      And now, Mariupol’s turn. Thanks terrorists, supported by Russian army…

    • petrohof says:

      exactly

  2. Darkness_99 says:

    And I forgot to say “Let the comment battle begin!!1″

  3. Alain says:

    302 ? I thought the “freedom fighters” had only 35 tanks, captured from the Ukrainian army ? We would have been lied to ?

  4. sammakkokeitto says:

    Sorry for this shit. What to feel when your relatives fee jn both sides and they are both nazists(( Russian ortodoxal christian nazi one side and ukraine catolic nazi other side. Thats why its better to be suomalinen or anybody not like them(

  5. sammakkokeitto says:

    Strange but no nazism in Moskow. In every IT organization there are many ukraineans. I think every 5-6 person. Many russians have ukrainean family names, i think not less than 20% like DidenKO, PetrenKO, KrotovICH or LeoskeviCH, KozlUK, LinEZ and DovgAN’, VejEN’

  6. pin occio says:

    It is just new terrorists tactics. Like it was in Donetsk Airport. During Minsk-1, terrorists used peace to concentrate troops near airport and finally they suceeded. Now with Minsk-2 they got Debaltsevo, same way but this time Ukrainian did not belive peace and was harder for terrorsists. So probably Minsk-3 will be near Mariupol.

    One strange fact. In Ukraine there are fallen more russian soliders than USA soliders in Iraq and Afganistan. But yet russians arent there yet.

    • Darkness_99 says:

      “In Ukraine there are fallen more russian soliders than USA soliders in Iraq and Afganistan. But yet russians arent there yet.”

      Says who? Prooflink please.

      P.S. Ukraine has plenty of blogs, there local couch commandos have ‘killed’ all of Russian army at least twice, like the guy named Yarchuk, who copypastes incorrect or obsolete data from wiki about Russian MOD regiments and then declares them KIA in thousands. Do not link to that stuff.

      P.P.S. Ukrainian version of English grammar & spelling is beyond good and evil=)

      • Alain says:

        I don’t know how many there are, but certainly more than the “none” that should have been, had Russia not invaded Ukraine :)

        The Russian mothers already like to have their sons and husbands back in Cargo 200, while the country is officially not at war. And it’s not finished, poor them ! Remember that the mighty USSR had to fight Ukrainian partisans until… 1955 ! When Vova says there is no military solution to this war, he perfectly knows it. Russia cannot (and will not) win it…

        • Darkness_99 says:

          So, no proof links again? What a shame

        • Voivode says:

          “Remember that the mighty USSR had to fight Ukrainian partisans until… 1955 ”

          One should “remember” that the vast majority of “Ukrainian partisans” (about 220,000 in the years 1941-1944) fought on the side of what you branded as “the mighty USSR” and against the ultranationalist “Ukrainian Insurgent Army”. One of the main reasons why the Soviet Union “had to fight” against the ultranationalist holdouts until 1956 (not 1955), for years after the war was over, was that these holdouts were small in numbers: there were about 300 of them in 1953.

          • Alain says:

            False. A part of them only (already too much). Most of them fought the nazis alongside the Red Army once they found out who they really were (seems you forget this part). Initially, they were ready to fight alongside anybody who would have freed them from communism. Which was bad from communist view (which seems to be yours) but not from anti-communist view…

            Thanks for the 1956 and 300 precisions, by the way. I missed them…

            May I also remember you about the 29th and 30th Waffen SS divisions as well as the SS Sturmbrigade RONA ? Do their existence make ALL Russians then nazis ? Twisted reality ? You should try to read more neutral History books. Neither the Ukrainian/Nationalist version, nor the Russian/Communist version are correct. The truth lies between…

            • Voivode says:

              If you’re going to reply to my messages, Alain, then be nice and read them carefully to avoid misunderstandings. I haven’t claimed that Ukrainians, Russians or Belarusians are some sort of “nazis”, neither have I shifted the topic to discussing Russian (or Belarusian) collaborationism with the Axis powers. The point I’ve made is that there were more “Ukrainian partisans” (let alone Ukrainian regular troops) that fought for the USSR, rather than against it. Hence, the first thing that comes to mind when you mention “Ukrainian partisans” are thousands of Ukrainians who fought under the command of Sydir Kovpak and other prominent Soviet partisan leaders. It is these people that are usually labelled as “Ukrainian partisans”.

              As for the ultranationalist “Ukrainian Insurgent Army”, it received a number of German light weapons and ammunitions and collaborated with the Germans and the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS even as late as in 1944. This doesn’t imply that I’m going to give a most feeling speech, saying how “wrong” it was to collaborate with the Nazis – it’s just a fact of history, and facts are neutral until we add our own meaning to them.

              • Alain says:

                My mistake indeed. I read a bit fast :)

                But it does not mean that, today, a majority of Ukrainian will fight to keep Ukraine a corrupt state (under Russian patronage). I’d rather bet the contrary :)

      • Anton says:

        darkness_99, thanks for clearing things out, but i think it’s nonsense to waste time on those who keep saying that all rebels are “russian army” and other stuff like that. it’s clear they know little to nothing about the conflict, most don’t even speak russian or ukrainian (i’m fluent in both languages), don’t know anybody living here, but still pretend to be experts and know more than the locals. as a native to donbass, i remember how the war started and know the situation first hand, i know a lot of those who are “rebels” now (most of them don’t hide their identity and are native to the region), but nobody gives a damn about that – they keep telling what’s going on here, around myself, like if they know it better. they are telling crap that in russia all religious groups other than orthodox christians are persecuted as “terrorists”, that “russian mothers” are sent to prisons for asking about their sons in the military, that people in donbass are “terrorists”, “fascists” and religious zealots etc. etc. etc. many users here are just brainwashed and biased teens who won’t learn anything, no matter how hard you try.

        • Alain says:

          Wrong again, Anton. I read correctly Russian and Ukrainian. I am able, thanks to Google Translation, to sustain a written conversation with a Russian for 2 hours (I did that here and then with some friends, until they started to be brainwashed). And I know plenty of Ukrainian people, from Kiev, Odessa or Donetsk. Donetsk : 50/50 between pro west and pro-east (just 2 in fact, and I’m not even 100% sure for the pro-east. I just guess). Odessa : at least 2/3-1/3 between pro-west and pro-east. Kiev : 100% pro-west. And ALL of them (except one pro-east) understand that any problem can/should be resolved through democratic ways, and certainly not a war started by a neighboring country. Now, if you think war is the way, so be it. The Donbass will have to be rebuilt, and I hope Kiev will not have to do it…

          This said, I read everyday articles both from Russian and Ukrainian sources. And I have found a very interesting source which shows the “mistakes” (not sure if it is mistakes as they are so gross. Most surely some twists of the reality) from the Russian sources. Of course, there are some mistakes/twists of the reality in the Ukrainian sources, and I even found myself some twice or three times.

          Regarding the “fascist”, nice to hear from you that this is a non-subject for any of both sides. Just for your info, the French fascists are (were, as some have been recently killed) in the Luhansk region. And there are some Jews fighting with Azov. They must be some kind of masochists…

          Finally, regarding the fact that you are in Donetsk : ok, perfect. But maybe you should get a bit more outside. So you can tell me where all these tanks and hardware are coming from ? Some of them not to be found in the Ukrainian army ever ? You can also tell me how the EXIF data of photos found on VK profiles of Russian soldiers show these were taken in… Donbass ? You can also tell me why all these profiles are deleted once shown to the world ? You can also tell me why some of the so-called local guys fighting for DNR/LNR are obviously from Central Asia/Siberia ? You can also tell me why Russia bombed Donbass from the Russian territory last summer ?

          A COUNTRY DOES NOT INVADE ITS NEIGHBOR WITHOUT UN MANDATE, WHATEVER THE REASONS. Remember that. Always… No Russia, no 5000 dead people and no destructions in the Donbass. As you say, the Donbass will remember it for long, in its flesh. And so will Ukraine. Not for the good of Ukrainian-Russian relationships. A strategic defeat for Putin…

          • Anton says:

            alain, i didn’t mean you in particular.

            “any problem can/should be resolved through democratic ways”

            oh yeah, tell me a story. we tried these ways. when the crisis came and the illegitimate gov came to power in a coup d’état, gave the green light to extremists and plunged the country into chaos, we launched a campaign of civil disobedience – people took to the streets and protested against the new gov, the appointment of governors in donbass by that gov and raised their voice for federalism and protection of the rus language and culture. all we wanted was to have self-government and defend our rights and culture. kiev responded with arrests, labelled us as “terrorists”, refused to meet our demands and demanded that we surrender and do what it says – they just hit us in the face, told us to shut up and obey like slaves. we couldn’t do anything – we couldn’t elect a new government, couldn’t change its policy, our rights were in peril, we were threatened, and that’s why we proclaimed the donetsk people’s republic. we tried to be heard, we tried to engage in conversations, even when kiev sent troops to attack us and impose its will on us, we didn’t make the first shot – our people met with the troops and urged them not to shoot, to let us live and have self-rule… all in vain – we got war. and that’s why we had no other choice but to ask russia for help.

            “And there are some Jews fighting with Azov”

            yes, just like there were jewish nazi collaborators during ww2. today neo-nazis from western regions are busy spreading hatred towards everything russian, but i’m not sure if one day they won’t follow the ways of their anti-semitic idols…

            “So you can tell me where all these tanks and hardware are coming from ?”

            i’m a civilian, i can’t be sure where every gun comes from… but all weapons i’ve seen on the streets here were bm21, bmp1 and 2, many btr80, lots of ural trucks, t64, zu23 and brdm2 – most of these things were produced in the soviet times and are as old as they look. most of them were either taken from military warehouses (like the only buk missile system that we have here – it comes from the base a-1402) or captured from the ukrainian troops (there are lots of trophies). and don’t forget that our land has its own factories like “tochmash” and the donetsk state plant of chemical products, where our workers produce gunpowder, shells and bullets to defend our land.

            and no, even though i haven’t seen any new weapons and never met any professional russian soldiers among the rebels, i’m not denying that russia must be somehow helping donbass – there is no way our motherland can leave us in a moment like this. it is in russia’s interest to help us.

            “photos found on VK profiles of Russian soldiers”

            vk is only a social network, you can’t be sure that a person sharing his photos there is even real, you can’t tell where and when those photos were made. everybody can create a page, upload a pic, make a screenshot, then delete the page and claim he’s got something. it’s a poor source of evidence.

            “Russia bombed Donbass from the Russian territory last summer ?”

            donbass is a huge territory, so i can’t say for sure if russia supported our troops with artillery fire in some cases (but i do know people living in the rostov region who saw some ukrainian shells falling on their territory – the shells themselves and the shell holes they made).

            • Alain says:

              Regarding your 5 points :
              – well, any revolution is undemocratic by nature. Even (and mostly) the French and Soviet revolutions. What was “nice” with the Ukrainian revolution is that there has been democratic elections rapidly after (already two – recognized as such by the whole world, compared to the sham referendums in Donetsk, Luhansk and Crimea). Had Donetsk and Luhansk chosen not to secede, they would have had their word in it, which should have helped them solve the problems you think you have (I have been in Ukraine and never saw anybody have any problem because he/she was speaking Russian). I give you one point : the cancelled law about the status of Russian was a VERY bad idea. I’d be in a Ukrainian government, I’d allow any oblast asking for it to have Russian as regional language, useable in any official place along with Ukrainian. At the same time, I’d make Ukrainian mandatory at school until 10yo for everybody, everywhere in the country… And, don’t worry : I don’t think Donbass will ever get back in Ukraine. And I think most Ukrainian people and Ukraine supporters will be happy with it, as Ukraine will be stronger without Donbass, than with it. At least there will not be any more Yanukovich-like majority in the country, for quite some time…
              – Jews collaborators : not so many, while I never saw a single Jew complaining about antisemitism in Ukraine. Even Israeli newspapers acknowledge it. Only Russia sees some, while there are more antisemitic statements and acts in Russia than anywhere else in Europe…
              – well, maybe you should move a bit ? There are plenty of geo-tagged pictures of hardware available only in Russia available online (which you’ll be able to check for yourself, being in the region). Including plenty of modern anti-aircraft, artillery systems or tanks which Ukraine never had. And what about the training of some of these hardware ? I’m not sure poor tractor drivers can use them as easily as that (especially Buk systems or other, more advanced systems) And what about the gas needed to make them work ? Maybe you have some well-hidden oil wells in the country, which you can use to make gas for your army ? Or plenty of money to buy it from somewhere ? And, of course, there are even pictures of hardware crossing the border with their crew (recently, from a Finnish journalist team) :) Regarding the Donetsk plant, not sure it is fully operational since 9/2. So you should run out of ammos soon, no ?
              – maybe. This remains to be seen, but why not…
              – the problem with Russian territory bombed from Ukraine, is that it can have been bombed by anybody, including so-called freedom fighters. I’d like to see some satellite pics of those you talk about, anyway. Always interesting… On the contrary, while Ukrainian territory bombed from Russia (I am definitely sure, and you check for yourself as the proof are readily available to anybody’s view) can have been bombed only by the Russian army, while Russia is officially not at war with Ukraine (practically speaking, it is, definitely)…

              • Alain says:

                Regarding your 5 points :

                – well, any revolution is undemocratic by nature. Even (and mostly) the French and Soviet revolutions. What was “nice” with the Ukrainian revolution is that there has been democratic elections rapidly after (already two – recognized as such by the whole world, compared to the sham referendums in Donetsk, Luhansk and Crimea). Had Donetsk and Luhansk chosen not to secede, they would have had their word in it, which should have helped them solve the problems you think you have (I have been in Ukraine and never saw anybody have any problem because he/she was speaking Russian). I give you one point : the cancelled law about the status of Russian was a VERY bad idea. I’d be in a Ukrainian government, I’d allow any oblast asking for it to have Russian as regional language, useable in any official place along with Ukrainian. At the same time, I’d make Ukrainian mandatory at school until 10yo for everybody, everywhere in the country… And, don’t worry : I don’t think Donbass will ever get back in Ukraine. And I think most Ukrainian people and Ukraine supporters will be happy with it, as Ukraine will be stronger without Donbass, than with it. At least there will not be any more Yanukovich-like majority in the country, for quite some time…

                – Jews collaborators : not so many, while I never saw a single Jew complaining about antisemitism in Ukraine. Even Israeli newspapers acknowledge it. Only Russia sees some, while there are more antisemitic statements and acts in Russia than anywhere else in Europe…

                – well, maybe you should move a bit ? There are plenty of geo-tagged pictures of hardware available only in Russia available online (which you’ll be able to check for yourself, being in the region). Including plenty of modern anti-aircraft, artillery systems or tanks which Ukraine never had. And what about the training of some of these hardware ? I’m not sure poor tractor drivers can use them as easily as that (especially Buk systems or other, more advanced systems) And what about the gas needed to make them work ? Maybe you have some well-hidden oil wells in the country, which you can use to make gas for your army ? Or plenty of money to buy it from somewhere ? And, of course, there are even pictures of hardware crossing the border with their crew (recently, from a Finnish journalist team) :) Regarding the Donetsk plant, not sure it is fully operational since 9/2. So you should run out of ammos soon, no ?

                – maybe. This remains to be seen, but why not…

                – the problem with Russian territory bombed from Ukraine, is that it can have been bombed by anybody, including so-called freedom fighters. I’d like to see some satellite pics of those you talk about, anyway. Always interesting… On the contrary, while Ukrainian territory bombed from Russia (I am definitely sure, and you check for yourself as the proof are readily available to anybody’s view) can have been bombed only by the Russian army, while Russia is officially not at war with Ukraine (practically speaking, it is, definitely)…

                (so long for the readability)

                • Anton says:

                  sorry for the long delay, i haven’t enough free time on my hands and don’t get to this site as often as i’d like to…

                  there were “democratic elections”, but they were held after the country had already been plunged into chaos and the new government – appointed in violation of the constitution – had infringed on our rights. we couldn’t ignore what was happening around us and wait until new elections in may, which would be held under the same illegitimate and authoritarian government and most likely rigged. our rights as citizens were being abused, gangs of extremists and “revolutionaries” were invading eastern regions, storming administrative buildings, threatening and attacking those who opposed them by the unelected government, and we had no other choice but to resist.

                  “At least there will not be any more Yanukovich-like majority”

                  you’re right, there will be another-corrupt-son-of-a-bitch-majority. i never liked yanukovich myself since he was a prime minister, and i hate him now for being a traitor to our interests, a two-faced politician, who maneuvered between europe and russia, trying to sit on two chairs at the same time, and didn’t even concede any official status to the russian language despite his promises. don’t blame us for voting for him – he won elections and support from our people in the east only because he was a native to our land and seen as the lesser evil compared to yushchenko and other aggressively anti-russian politicians. he was corrupt and took advantage of this to line his pockets, but so were all of his predecessors.

                  “there are more antisemitic statements and acts in Russia than anywhere else in Europe”

                  this is far from being true. according to global adl surveys, russia is almost as anti-semitic as kazakhstan, georgia and latvia, even less so than ukraine and poland.

                  “There are plenty of geo-tagged pictures of hardware available only in Russia”

                  maybe. like i said, i’m not denying that russia is somehow supporting us – after all, it’s russia’s moral duty to help us in this crucial moment and it’s in russia’s interest to do so. all i can say as a native to donbass is that MOST weapons here are old. all what i see around myself here is just a large number of old grad missile systems, btr80s, t64s, bmp1s and bmp2s – they are all relics of the soviet past. if there are some newer vehicles, they must be small in numbers and hard to be found. i’d also like to say we can buy weapons and ammunitions from abroad, numerous russian private companies (not the rus government, but large private companies) are providing us with money and many other things, so it’s not just putin who helps our people, but also the country which he heads as president.

                  i also haven’t met any russian soldiers among the rebels and doubt there is a significant number of them here. i’ve used to meet a LOT of our rebel soldiers, speak with them, get to know them and can say it for sure. for example, i spoke with guys from the sparta battalion (they can be easily recognized by their characteristic soldiers’ sleeves), and almost every one of them appeared to be a citizen of donbass coming from krasnodon, roven’ki, dovzhanskiy, pavlovka, torez etc. they are our guys. the core of our armed forces consists of our own citizens who received military training (foreign volunteers are only a minority here), we have enough people who can handle with guns and defend our borders and we can potentially add thousands of men into the army. we’re not just farmers and tractor drivers – we have a large number of those who served in the military and there are professional soldiers and officers who once served in the ukrainian army among us.

                  “Regarding the Donetsk plant, not sure it is fully operational”

                  most factories are not fully operational, indeed, because they were badly damaged or almost completely destroyed by ukrainian artillery systems, but those that were evacuated still bring their capabilities into full play. i even know where some of the evacuated plants are now and what sort of production they are putting out, but i’m afraid that’s confidential…

                  regarding “the problem with Russian territory bombed from Ukraine” – it would be completely absurd, if not insane, for our men to mount an attack on the territory of russia. it’s like saying that we’re shelling ourselves. and sorry, but i don’t retrieve any satellite images from the web, i just keep in touch with lots of people living in matveyevo-kurgansky district, and if they all were telling me they saw shells coming from the ukrainian side – and they knew where the ukrainian troops were deployed – i tend to believe them.

                  • Anton says:

                    my bad, i accidentally deleted some words: “…threatening and attacking those who opposed them. OUR RIGHTS AS CITIZENS WERE ABUSED by the unelected government, and we had no other choice but to resist”.

                  • Alain says:

                    My turn for the long delay :)

                    – the chaos the country has plunged into was organized by Russia. Strelkov acknowledged for this. No Russian invasion, no chaos and you could have participated to the elections to protect peacefully your citizen rights (that’s how it works, in a real democracy). So long now: you have to deal with DNR/LNR-made “democracy” (the one you seem to like, where you can kill your neighbour if you are unhappy with him…)

                    – regarding the “another corrupt son of a bitch” : maybe, maybe not. Time will tell. Anyway, the work being done now is better than the thefts of Yanukovich clan. Not sure it will ne done correctly to the end, but better than nothing

                    – antisemitism in Russia : http://antisemitism.org.il/article/94375/2014-antisemitism-report Not as low as you think…

                    – the Russian soldiers : maybe you should move a bit around the region to have a broader idea of the reality. Foreign and Russian journalists finds them very easily :)

                    – regarding the evacuated plants : don’t worry, it is quite well known where they are now :D And where gas and ammos come from, too…

                    – the “Russian territory bombed from Ukraine” : they are dumb enough to attack Ukrainian troops from civilian places (seen on English Russia !), so you can guess that would not be a problem :) Not more than Russia bombing Ukraine from its own territory…

                    Whatever, I personally now wish a real ceasefire, meaning no more attacks from DNR/LNR on the remaining Ukrainian territory. If you wish to live your life, go on as it will help strengthen Ukraine. Just don’t spread war anymore, any farther, because if you do, you can bet the war will go much farther than anybody would wish, unfortunately…

  7. Ben says:

    war is ugly and full of lies, i very much want to know who is responsible and who thought to use landmines. they usually only hit the innocent for many years to come… nasty minds are planning the conquering of a country and its people once more…

  8. Voivode says:

    What our childish “experts” on EnglishRussia can’t understand is that all great powers fight for their strategic interests and security concerns and make efforts to legitimise their actions. Russia, China, India, the US – all of these countries and many others are eager to expand their political influence abroad, eliminate disloyal political regimes in other countries, bring loyal governments to power, provide financial and military support for ideologically and politically favourable insurgents operating in other countries, etc. This is how the world is run – everything is based on a clear calculation of long-term interests, economic and political benefits. This said, there is nothing surprising that Russia is trying to provide some sort of autonomy for the rebellious Russian-speaking population of Ukraine, secure its borders from the expansion of NATO, and hold on access to the Black Sea – it has merely reverted to policies that are typical for other great powers.

    Those who are found of UN mandates should keep in mind that a country can wage a proxy war or invade a sovereign state without calling for a UN mandate: both Operation Boot and Operation TPAJAX were engineered without any mandates, the US invaded Panama in 1989 without acquiring a UN mandate and vetoed a UN resolution criticising the invasion (a majority of the Council’s 15 members voted in favour of the resolution, but to no effect), ECOWAS member states invaded Liberia in 1990 without any mandates, NATO launched an invasion of Yugoslavia in 1999 without acquiring a mandate (because Russia vetoed a UN Security Council resolution at that time). This is not to mention that UN mandates themselves can be used as a flimsy pretext for an unauthorised mission of regime change, that a country having more “allies” among members of the UN Security Council can gain more votes in support of its actions and legitimise them, however unethical they may be, that members of the Security Council may find it convenient to lift their strict reading of the UN Charter and make exceptions, when it suits them, etc.

  9. Boris Yellzin says:

    Russian army need to stay out of Ukraina. It’s as simple as this. This situation is cause by Russian. All dumbass excuses are bullshit. I don’t have anything against Russian people. I hope they’ll soon notice how sick their leaders are.

  10. Alain says:

    Long Live to Novorosiya!!!

    Death to Fascist Ukraine!

  11. bilbo says:

    two of those tanks are t64, only used by the Russian army. so they must have come from Russia. volunteers are allowed to take their tanks from Russian army depots? then it must have happened with the approval of the Russian command. nice to see them knocked out though.

    • El Barto says:

      T-64 is a main ukrainian tank. This tank is even made in Ukraine in soviet era. Russian army doesn’t use T-64.

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