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9 Visiting Abandoned Russian Space Forces Object

Visiting Abandoned Russian Space Forces Object

Posted on February 3, 2015 by tim


Aja, the blogger, belongs to the group of the urban bloggers who rarely tell where the photos come from. This is because they visit highly interesting objects that are guarded no matter they were out of service yet. Thanks to this the inner furnishings of this places is in much better condition – all the machines, displays and control panels are in place and might be even working if you push the right button. So let’s see what they got this time:

Sadly Aja doesn’t caption what she sees much. We can understand her – she is probably trying not to break their urban explorers conspiracy when they go into such places.

So just photos, no comments.

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9 Responses to “Visiting Abandoned Russian Space Forces Object”

  1. Ota Bartos says:

    NIP-20. Solnechnyi. Komsomolsk-na-Smure. Location: https://goo.gl/maps/SxZTY

  2. Tutan Camon says:

    I know what is it.It’s a powder milk factory.:)

  3. Martinus van Brederode says:

    “…who rarely tell where the photos come from”

    But she does put the name of her website on them (which has contact details). Does not sound very secretive to me ;)

  4. Martinus van Brederode says:

    There’s one thing I’ve been wanting to ask, I hope there are Russian readers who can answer: what’s the Russian fascination with having a greenish/blueish border of about a meter and a half in all their buildings?

  5. Voivode says:

    Nice golf balls on the first pic; too bad I don’t have a club big enough to help them into the air.

  6. Andy says:

    ” what’s the Russian fascination with having a greenish/blueish border of about a meter and a half in all their buildings?”.

    I suppose you write about the different coloured walls? OK, this is common, not only in Russia, for industrial used rooms. The lower part is painted with an oil-based colour on which oil or dirt could be wiped off easy, the upper part is painted with a chalk-based colour which is a lot cheaper. I hope that I was able to giv you an answer.

  7. Andy says:

    What make me pondering is the fact that so many gear was left back in those sites. This gear may have been still valuable when this site was given up. What might have been the reason for this decision? Was it just a too simple minded order? Is the long distance transport and coordination of such surplus parts too costly? Do the russian military “deciders” are not interested in national efficiency? Is this an example for a typical disadvantage of a socialist society, that many people are not interested to gain the highest efficiency as all (or at least most) things a commonly-owned? What I would have done, at least, taken it all apart, seperate the still usable fragments, transporting this to another of compareable stations and I would have thrown the rest into a few railway waggons to recycle it. But maybe I do not have the correct impression upon the fact how FAR away this site may be from typical recycling facilities. So far I was not able to find NIP-20 and its location on a map…

    • Mr B says:

      All of this equipment is Analog not digital. the components are discrete, not on printed circuit boards. It uses massive amounts of energy and creates tremendous heat. It has been specialized for microwave tracking of fast moving objects, with counter battery functions, hence the room housing that large bank of analog computers. Everything there could be run on a 486 or early Pentium computer. Very nice build though – quality components. Little or no salvage worth doing – excepting the copper and silver wiring (which is missing from the cable runs).

  8. s.a. says:

    All these abandoned places civil or military, they should break it down and recycle the materials, a new state owned company that creates jobs and materials.

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