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4 Uninvitedly In the Flats of Pripyat

Uninvitedly In the Flats of Pripyat

Posted on October 2, 2013 by team


We are going to enter one of the houses of Pripyat that has been preserved rather well and visit some of its flats left by its owners almost thirty years ago.

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4 Responses to “Uninvitedly In the Flats of Pripyat”

  1. Georg says:

    Everything has been trashed, every little bit of copper wire has been taken…by who? My bet is that there is lots of copper with serious nuclear radiation in the black market. I mean how dork man must be, to go to loot Pripyat?

    • Jim-Bob says:

      While I agree with your distaste for looters, I think your premise is wrong. Not every place in the exclusion zone is dangerously radioactive. It all depends on how the various particles were dispersed during the accident. Even things like shut windows can make a dramatic difference, and there are places inside of many buildings with radiation lower than what would be background in a lot of places. Much of the wiring would have been well protected form contamination from alpha and beta emitters and thus would not have transmuted to a radioactive isotope. This is not to say the area is safe for long term human habitation. Many places will still be radioactive for millenia to come, especially the ground where water drains after rain storms (this is also true in places around Fukushima today).

      As to why people would loot such a notorious place, it all comes down to economics. Many are desperate for a way to make money to feed their families, and desperate people do desperate things. The exclusion zone is probably not that heavily guarded when you get far enough from the reactor and vehicle storage lot, so it’s probably easy to do.

  2. mrpelicanpants says:

    Why are all the floors exposed concrete? I realize no one lives there anymore, but were the apartments all like that?

  3. Piquerish says:

    Once again, I must thank the editors and photographers who chose not to show the desecration of Pripyat by graffiti vandals and criminals, who in their own minds see themselves as “artists.” Give them no press.

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