21 Disabled And Abandoned Soviet Tanks, Part II

Disabled And Abandoned Soviet Tanks, Part II

Posted on July 9, 2012 by team


More photos of Soviet disabled and abandoned tanks. The first part can be found here.


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21 Responses to “Disabled And Abandoned Soviet Tanks, Part II”

  1. Mercal says:

    Most tanks were destroyed from attacks from planes. Russia out produced us (Germany) in the end unforgettably.

  2. thiox says:

    Amazing!

  3. Buratino says:

    Photo third up from bottom shows a KV “big turret” with 18 visible non-penetrating hit marks. There is a German combat report from 1941 telling of another of these KV holding up a division for more than one day. At start of war Red Army had very many obsolete tanks, but also a small amount of T-34 and KV variants that were certainly the best tanks in the world in 1941. Some say “General winter” saved Russia. I say it was Red Army tank forces, who fought very cleverly and were the bravest of the brave.

    • D says:

      It’s a ton of reasons, not least of which is completely changing their tanks, gaining air superiority, establishing troop supply lines and generally out maneuvering the Germans for the second half of the war.

      The fact that they were able to secretly reposition thousands of tanks and make surprise attacks was instrumental in wining many battles.

    • ptc says:

      T-34 is the same as american M4 Schermann – cheap, non-complicated, mass-produced tank with weak armor. Encounter with any german anti tank weapon – tank, tank destroyer, anti tank gun, panzerschreck – mean death for tank crew. Armor penetration range for T-34 is 3000 meters for most weapons, for german Tiger is only 50 meters (!!!). There is only one difference between T-34 and M4 – in Russia, nobody cares if tank crew died. Just compare casulties of german and russian tank crew, T-34 was moving coffin, first hit from almost any anti-tank german weapon destroyed it.

      • vorontsevich says:

        Well, thats a very unbiased analysis.

      • Buratino says:

        Perhaps you did not notice all my references to 1941, when T-34 and KV where, without any doubt, the best tanks in the world. As for not caring about lives of tank crews, well, this is simply the usual anti Russian propaganda so often seen all over internet. Marshal of tank forces, Pavel Rotmistrov, who was commander of 5th Guards Tank Army at Kursk, was sacked from his command later in war because of high casualties being suffered by his army. This is hardly an uncaring attitude! This “human wave” and uncaring of life nonsense is simply German propaganda that was continued by West into cold war, and still continues…. Wake up! grow up! this nonsense should be in it’s coffin years past

  4. CZenda says:

    The T34 with turret number 215 was destroyed in Moravian village Brumovice on 15/16th of April 1945.

  5. John says:

    Yes the KV was a tough target but Germany answered with the Tiger, the KV and T-34 didn’t have one chance after that, it was the onset of winter that saved so many lives, while many more Soviet lives where lost trying to hold off superior forces and equipment in substandard equipment like the KV became after the introduction of the Tiger… and there are photos of Tigers with 100+ none penetrating hits.

    • vorontsevich says:

      There were KV-1s which took over a 130 hits which didn’t penetrate (Zinovy Kolobanov’s no.864).

      And if the Soviet tanks didn’t have a chance, how come they won so decisively? If it was winter that the the Red Army, how come almost all of the decisive battles of the war were in spring, summer or autumn and not in winter (when winter would have saved the Red Armys arse).

    • vorontsevich says:

      There were KV-1s which took over a 130 hits which didn’t penetrate (Zinovy Kolobanov’s no.864).

      And if the Soviet tanks didn’t have a chance, how come they won so decisively? If it was winter that the the Red Army, how come almost all of the decisive battles of the war were in spring, summer or autumn and not in winter (when winter would have supposedly saved the Red Armys arse).

    • Buratino says:

      Winter and all other weather conditions effect both sides equally. Russians are humans and feel the cold no different to anyone else. This nonsense about winter saving Russia is part of the “untermensch” disgusting propaganda. Besides, all know Moscow was saved by the holy ikon being flown constantly around city during the battle….. Oh, and I think some guys from Siberia had an effect on outcome……

  6. CZenda says:

    There are many reasons Blitzkrieg turned to “Dreißigjährige Blitzkrieg”, but simply said, the concept only worked in well developped countries. The whole Nazi war machinery simply was not ready for the primitive conditions of USSR. Long before the “General Winter” came, the whole army was bogged down due to “rasputitza”. Also, nobody thought that Soviets were more than ready to accept losses 1:10 and use “scorched earth” tactics without any regard for the civilian population. Etc. etc.

    • Buratino says:

      Rasputitza happens in spring, except for sudden unexpect thaw, usually followed by re-freeze, and Germans were stopped dead in their tracks long before spring 1942. Russia has been in existence for a long time now, Napolean failed, with usual excuses about the winter. Germans fought against Russia in WW1, so how can they be surprised by Russian weather and roads. Surely this is incompetance on massive scale by them. As for scorched earth, well, I think it was Germans who were burning and killing everything in their path, without mercy for any women and children. How long before people get the message that you do not attack Russia and expect to win. And when you loose, please, no ridiculous excuses about weather and such and so forth….

  7. dersager says:

    20 million Soviet military & civilians killed

  8. CZenda says:

    Twice. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rasputitsa. I was talking about autumn rasputitza of 1941. Blitzkrieg theory and practice was dependant on swift penetration through the weakest spots of the defense. The goal was to achieve total confusion of enemy and to avoid long war of attrition. Mobility was the key to the success, which was hopelessly lost on poor Russian roads after the summer of 1941.

    • vorontsevich says:

      You talk of winter and climate. It’s one thing for the Germans to get bogged down in mud, it’s another thing for the Red Army to take advantage and counter-attack.

      Winter and weather played a part, but in no way were they crucial. It’s not like blizzards and thunderstorms pushed the Germans back to Berlin.

      But it might kill you to take Russia’s side on anything, so no real surprises.

  9. ricsi says:

    Interesting to see several knocked out British Matildas and US General Lee tanks. Both really inferior to T34 and PZ4!

  10. ALE P says:

    I like the photo number 50 of a T-26 with applique’ armour like a T-50 ….strange conversion !!!!!

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