loading...
18 An-30: Mission Impossible

An-30: Mission Impossible

Posted on May 25, 2012 by team


A Russian military plane An-30 while performing a flight within “the Open Sky” mission went on the runway in the Czech Republic and started burning. 19 people suffered, most of them are in a poor condition…

Advertisement



Exchange traffic with English Russia, click here

18 Responses to “An-30: Mission Impossible”

  1. 山下智久 says:

    what happened?

  2. Valerie says:

    They had problems with the wheels, so don´t bring that “oh no. Russia is doomed old rusty planes” kind of BS. An American atomic submarine, the other day, in Florida caught fire and was destroyed. Not much about that in western corporate media? Nothing.Check it out.

    • rostit says:

      The sub is in Maine, not Florida. They are pretty far apart if you check a map. The sub was under repairs in a drydock and it was not destroyed, but it was heavily damaged in the front section and no damage happened to the reactor area. No one was on board since it was in drydock.
      These two things have nothing to do with each other. Get your facts right before looking like a fool again.

    • Mister Dog says:

      Wow, someone has some inferiority issues…actually the USS Miami fire in a Maine (not Florida) shipyard fire was in the news. It wasn’t a huge story because the submarine wasn’t “destroyed” and the reactor was never in any danger.

  3. Fatswollow says:

    The Antonov An-30 aircraft with 23 servicemen on board – 14 Russians and nine Czechs – skidded off the runway after its nosewheel collapsed on landing at the Caslav Military Airport. Then the fire erupted at the aircraft.

  4. Mr.B says:

    The plane crashed.

  5. petrohof says:

    i think it is meant it went off the end of the runway after it caught fire. the fire equipment in picture looks like airport stuff so maybe it was taking off and had to abort.

  6. Crocodile says:

    Plane landed too bad, so the front wheel broke and from sparks become fire while braking without front wheel. PS.I live 50 km from the airport :)

  7. rostit says:

    These things happen. I hope all on board a speedy recovery.

  8. Steve says:

    Valerie, the sub was in Maine and was undergoing overhaul. Probably an industrial accident. The fire did not reach any nuclear compartments, the sub was not destroyed, although it may have to be scrapped (too expensive to repair).

    Anyway, crappy rusty Russian airplanes. Lots of them out there, more will crash.

  9. yojimbo says:

    It should say “Open Skies” it is a program involving several nations the US and Russia included basically it allows each other to fly over airspace in a special aircraft and observe another nations military activity.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_Open_Skies

  10. neilobusk says:

    yep American planes crash a lot more than russian ones
    im from the uk and ain`t no fan of the yanks

    • (r)evolutionist says:

      And the American economy crashes more than the Russian one, too.

    • Hirsh says:

      As already said about the sub fire. It was not in Florida, the sub was in dry dock for extended servicing, it was not destroyed, radioactive compartments were not compromised, and it was in fact reported on by all of the local and national news networks available here in Florida. It wasn’t a huge story because it wasn’t a huge story.

      As for American planes crashing a lot more then Russian ones… That’s because no one outside of the eastern block buys crappy Russian planes. Nor are they likely to start, what with the recent SPECTACULAR failure of Suhkio’s SSJ100 “World Class” airliner crashing and burning, killing all 44 people on board, many of them BUYERS for western airlines, lol. Good luck selling that thing now! Too bad i was a big fan of that project but that crash is damning for the planes prospects. WTH it straight up flew into the side of a mountain. Perhaps those Russian blondes pulling wire on the production floor were the problem? lol

      There are more crashes of Western built jets simply by virtue of the fact they OWN the international civilian market for aircraft sales. A position in the industry they’ve earned…unlike Soviet/Russian aircraft manufacturers.

Leave a Reply