14 Approaching the Abandoned Soviet Radar

Approaching the Abandoned Soviet Radar


The beauty of every place lost in time is revealed in a certain season. The place we'll be visiting today looks the best in the middle of autumn as the construction seems even more magnificent in rainy weather.


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The road that leads to the point of destination looks nice, yellow and beautiful.

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14 Responses to “Approaching the Abandoned Soviet Radar”

  1. Joseph says:

    The area didn´t seem to be totally abandoned?

  2. petrohof says:

    so if i understand this, it is abandoned, still has power, is guarded, but cannot work?

  3. Noose says:

    How about:

    -how far we self hating-american-wannabee-Russian brats can go, selling out our country for a possible Green card ticket to the western Titanic?

    Yes the place looks beautiful but you orange guys are a disgrace…

  4. boombasstic says:

    wonderful abandonned complex, and great pictures. i wish id visit it. thanks for sharing

  5. Tutan says:

    DELHI?KABUL?TEHERAN?Nice targets!!!!

    • erv says:

      I don’t think those are targets. To my understanding it is the thing that once was able to detect virtually any missile launch within many thousands of kilometers in the direction it is “looking at”. Something similar was demolished in Latvia some years after it got its independence.

  6. al says:

    Gorgeous. Once again, you guys outdid yourself–the pictures are beautiful, the photo cutlines are amusing in their mangled English.

    It’s also great to see abandoned military sites like this one–to actually be inside the sites I was tasked to monitor in USAF intell. Keep up the great work. (And more Femen!)

  7. (r)evolutionist says:

    The countryside is so nice, why go further?

  8. alessio215 says:

    beautiful inside pictures of a facility from the glorious “space age” days.
    Thanks for sharing this beautiful vintage machinary .
    It makes me sad that they are totally abandoned to dacay

    • ptc says:

      It is abandoned, but Russia or other ex-soviet does not have enough money to properly scrap it. Technology was obsolete 20 years ago and only precious metals like aluminium and steel are left. Leaving it as is is cheap. These lights on the top must be on, to prevent planes to crash to antenna.

  9. bobs says:

    very cool!

  10. kiwilaka says:

    Thanks for sharing. I’m always interested in the old glory of the USSR. I played all the s.t.a.l.k.e.r games. The photo’s show the same atmosphere.

  11. todd says:

    Dont you guys get the creeps walking around a building like this.

  12. Ota Bartos says:

    The facility in pictures is anti-ballistic missile radar Dunay-3U located at Chekhov near Moscow. Depicted is its biggest receiver (northern) site, which is located here https://goo.gl/maps/JifnD, the smallest (southern) transceiver site is located some 2-3 km away, here https://goo.gl/maps/Jm2z8

    Dunay-3U at Chekhov together with Dunay-3M at Kubinka were part of A-35 ACBM, an anti-ballistic missile system which was once defending Moscow from being swept out by Western ICBMs when doomsday come. The A-35 is already deprecated and has been replaced with A-135 which utilizes the only one radar facility Don-2N at Sofrino.

    Dunay-3U is now decomissioned and reportedly even dismantled. Once it gave 1.8 MW at UHF and sported 10 specialised computers. A closed town Chekhov-7 was built nearby to accomodate officers serving at Dunay-3U and their families, nowadays abandoned.

    Anyhow, there are much more interesting things in the close-to-mid vicinity of Dunay-3U and still in operation -) …

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