10 Life As It Was In Occupied Smolensk, Part II

Life As It Was In Occupied Smolensk, Part II


Today we’ll continue showing pictures of Smolensk occupied by German military forces during WWII.

Wagons on  Main Street which is now Great Soviet Street.

Destructions next to the main building of the post-office. The place is now occupied by the Central Hotel.

On the bridge across the Dnieper river.

The employment exchange on Commandant Square (Smirnov’s Square today)

On Commandant Square (Smirnov’s Square today).

A temporary bridge across the Dnieper which leads to Bazaar Square (Kolkhoz Square today).

Panoramic view of destructed Smolensk.

Residential houses next to the eastern part of the vallum.

Destructions near the Specialists’ House after bombardment.

The building of the District Drama Theater.

German pointers on Commandant Square (Smirnov’s Square today).

The eastern view of Cathedral Hill.

Main Street (Great Soviet Street today).

The intersection between Lenin Street and Great Soviet Street.

‘Jews are your eternal enemies! Stalin and Jews belong to the same gang of criminals’ – Hitler’s agitation.

The western view of the Cathedral Hill.

The Police School on Kiev Street (Lenin District Directorate of Internal Affairs on Gagarin Street). A Security Office was dislocated here till September 1942.

Residential houses next to the eastern area of the vallum.

Residential houses next to the eastern area of the vallum.

Hiltler’s agitation stand next to the administration board on Townhall Street (Glinky’s Street today).

The bell-tower of  Vosnesensk Monastery (an exhibition hall of Smolensk reserve museum) is on the right, the corner of the Commune House is on the left.

Demonstration in honour of Hitler’s birthday. A shot from some German agitation movie.

A queue in front of the building of employment exchange.

Peaceful villages are washing their clothes in a water hole.

Smolensk children.

Smolensk priest.

Inhabitants of occupied Smolensk.

Soviet prisoners of war next to Specialists’ House on Kiev Street (Gagarin Street today).

A queue in front of the employment exchange.

On Bazaar Square (Kolkhoz Square today).

Entry of Soviet troops to Smolensk. September 1943.

Entry of Soviet troops to Smolensk. September 1943.

Intelligence men are talking to inhabitants of Smolensk. September 1943.

First encounters. Next to Kolodnya Station. September 1943.

Mine clearing done by deminers. September 1943.

A meeting devoted to the event of assignment of the name ‘Smolensk’ to the 312 rifle division.

Soviet warriors take up defensive dispositions in Smolensk. September 1943.

Anti-aircraft-gunners protect the city from raids of German aviation. September 1943.

Artillery section. September 1943.

Smolensk. September 1943.

In a hospital of Smolensk.

Anti-aircraft-gunners protect the city from raids of German aviation. September 1943.

Crossing the Dnieper river. September 1943.

Smolensk after the Nazi had left the city. September 1943.

The panoramic view of destructed Smolensk.

Next to the cinema ‘The 15th’.

The eastern area of Smolensk fortress.

Destructions in Smolensk.

Smolensk after the Nazi had left the city.

The House with a Clock. Great Soviet Street.

Next to the ’15th’ Cinema (building of connection college).

Employment Exchange. Young people of Smolensk were sent to works in Germany from here.

Inhabitants are listening to messages of the Soviet Information Bureau.

Wounded soldiers in the Park of Recreation and Leisure.

The Red Flag above Smolensk Hotel. September 25, 1943.

Inhabitants are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

First encounters. Next to Kolodnya station. September 1943.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Inhabitants of the city are coming back to freed Smolensk.

Poet Tvardovsky makes a speech at a meeting. October 1943.

A meeting in freed Smolensk. October 1943.

Restoration of a communications connection in Smolensk.

Restoration of the bridge across the Dnieper.

Restoration of tramlines in Smolensk.

Restoration of tramlines in Smolensk.

Construction of new buildings in Smolensk.

Restoration of a sewing factory in Smolensk. December 1943.

Restoration of the railroad in Smolensk.

The first Soviet newspaper in freed Smolensk.

The first Soviet newspaper in freed Smolensk.

The first screening in a cinema.

Location: Smolensk

via humus 

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10 Responses to “Life As It Was In Occupied Smolensk, Part II”

  1. Sasha says:

    IMHO Western Europe has had it easy if you look at the occupation and destruction of many Eastern cities.

  2. sst says:

    Amazing series of photos with great narrative

  3. vla says:

    “city is destroyed, but now city is free”

  4. jeffrey pigden says:

    I sometimes wonder how different the war would have been had Stalin not purged the army. If he had retained some soldiers instead of a crowd of toads.

    • Babysitter says:

      In fact, in “army purges” are more propaganda than serious issue that ruined an army. Overall, less than 10% of officers went through the trials and many of them were just fired but not sent to Siberia or anywhere. Only the highest command had it worse, with 3 of 5 marshals and many komandarms executed. Soviet army had much more significant problems that led to catastrophic year of 41, and purge was not the most significant one.

    • CZenda says:

      There are countless possibilities. One of the viable scenarios is Soviet cutthroats attacking Nazi thugs from behind while they are still fighting in France.

  5. AE Smith says:

    “Freed” means jew-communist rule?

    • Alex Belov says:

      By that time, Stalin has purged the Jews from the positions of power. The few left in the government were no more than his minions. So it was just the Communist rule. Bad as it was, it was still better than the Nazi pigs.

    • ayaa says:

      “Freed” means freed from German rule.
      And back under Russian rule. No matter how bad things were.

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