6 The Kazakhstan Of 1993 And 1994

The Kazakhstan Of 1993 And 1994

Posted on November 25, 2011 by


After the disintegration of the USSR, independent Kazakhstan faced a lot of challenges it had to get over. We have already told you about events which happened in 1991 and 1992, and now it’s time for 1993 and 1994.

So, in 1993, they began introducing economic reforms into the country, such as turning citizens of Kazakhstan into potential shareholders and creating its own currency – the tenge.

On January 28th, they established the Constitution of Kazakhstan which later turned out to be the most democratic one. The country became a parlamentary republic and the Kazakh language became the state language.

People could see the Head of the Supreme Soviet of Kazakhstan triumphing over it.

However, his triumph lasted not for long. The same year, the Supreme Soviet declared its voluntary dissolution because since it had too many powers, the principle of separation of powers was hard to comply with under the given Constitution.

Alma Ata was renamed into Almaty.

People faced lack of public transport, fuel and manpower and had to wait at bus stations for hours.

They let a contract, which was named ‘Conract of the Century’ with an American company Chevron.

That year, Kazakh Soviet communist politician Dinmukhamed Konayev died on August, 22nd. He had been the first secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Kazakhstan up to 1986. He preferred going to work on foot to company’s cars and only after his death, they found out that he had neither a car, nor home of his own, but donated most of his money to Alma Ata Children’s Home #1. Thousands of people came to say their last good-bye to ‘the Great Man’.

In 1992, thousands of Kazakh families from neighbouring countries began coming back to their neck of the woods after the official invitation made by the President. However, in 1993, government established an immigration quota, and by 2000, very few people expressed their willingness to come back to Kazakhstan.

In 1993, they launched a program of mass privatisation. According to the program, they distributed coupons among all the people of the country which they had to give in at privatisation investment funds, which, in their turn, had to privatize state enterprises and pay dividends to the people. As a result, enterprises passed into the hands of a small group of people who never paid a dollar to their shareholders.

People learnt what the term ‘ghost city’ meant. These were usually cities which economy was based on just one industry. Stoppages and interruptions in heating, power and water supply were turning to be a norm.

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6 Responses to “The Kazakhstan Of 1993 And 1994”

  1. Marco Go says:

    Thank you! as every day you post gorgeous picts that allow foreigners to peep in the real alma of Russian people. This is one of the best website I know. Congratulation!

  2. Matlok says:

    Sad times! The red head with the bread is hot though!

  3. Verto says:

    Well,in my view,All of the development of former Soviet “Istan” states goes to the Soviets. I mean big brother “Russia” ! ! ! ! ! ! !.their industrial,educational,infrastructure system and civilise attitude are just because of Russians ! ! ! ! ! ! !Russian “occupation” was bless for all “Istans” ! ! ! !

  4. Saddim says:

    Hmmm i am very glad that our mentality didnt change cause of those russians.Its wrong opinion thinking that Russian occupation is a bless for all istans,you’d better not joiking with that if u dont know real things.

  5. javox says:

    i guess he is pretty crazy….wasnt that a bless

  6. mango-packer says:

    that car without wheels is made in germany either an opel commodore c or a vauxhall viceroy in the UK, there were 15 registered viceroys in the UK as of 2006. was also made in australia as a holden commodore VB or VC.. odd for me to see it as i used to own a VB, had to wiki it as i wondered why an old holden would be in kazakhstan

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