16 A Visit to A Russian Icebreaker

A Visit to A Russian Icebreaker

Posted on August 7, 2011 by kulichik


Today we’ll visit an atomic vehicle named 50 Years Of Victory and participate in a short excursion along its machinery department and other premises. All the pictures are represented below.

An atomic icebreaker is a plain steamer. The atomic reactor heats water that turns into steam that rotates turbines that activate generators that generate electricity that enters electric motors that set 3 marine propellers in motion.

The body depth at the place of ice breaking is 5 cm. Such a ship has a double bottom and won’t have to retreat in case of a hole.

The excursion started in the cabin of the engineer in chief. The 50 Years Of Victory vessel is provided with 2 nuclear reactors. They have enough power to supply with energy a city inhabited by 2 million people.

The nuclear rectors are thoroughly protected from accidents and external impacts. The icebreaker can stand a collision with a passenger airplane or similar icebreaker at the speed of 10 km an hour.

Fuel is changed every 5 years.

Rectifiers.

Electric motors and rotating screws. This place which is very noisy is located 9 meters under the waterline.

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Electric motor of the vehicle.

Steering engine looks impressive.

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Steering engine set in motion.

Upper part of the wheel. The wheel itself is located underwater. Icebreakers have better maneuvering characteristics than regular vessels.

–nextpage–

Each turbine (there are 2 of them) rotates 3 generators producing alternate current. The yellow boxes at the background are rectifiers which produce constant current for electric motors.

The desalination plants produce over 120 tons of fresh water.

You can try the water if you want. Regular distilled water.

Anti-noise cabin.

–nextpage–

There are many ways of protection from emergencies. Fire extinguishing with carbon dioxide is one of them.

The icebreaker is controlled by three people. Each of them is on duty 4 hours a day. A crew consists of a sailor, a chief of the watch and a mate-on watch.

This is a sailor. Look at the size of the steering wheel.

Radiohouse.

A representative staircase.

A corridor with doors leading to cabins.

A snack-bar.

A library.

A lobby and a reception hall.

A mailing box. Don’t forget to send a postcard from the North pole!

–nextpage–

Swimming pools.

Sports ground.

Weights room.

This vessel contains alcohol solution.

Now let’s see what dishes are served to guests. You may choose any place you like.

All salads here are served buffet style.  3 variants of the main course were available.

Dishes from the fine dining restaurants aboard are made by cooks from Argentine, utensils are imported from Europe.

3 German pastry-cooks were busy with making wonderful desserts all day long.

via sergeydolya

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16 responses to “A Visit to A Russian Icebreaker”

  1. Galitsin says:

    Does anyone have any idea whether the ship can embark passengers?

  2. Verto says:

    who is the weird creature above the “9 meter” slogan card in pic,3 ? ? ? ? ?

  3. Galitsin says:

    Thanks a lot!

  4. BlowME says:

    Looks like a very cozy ship to be in a long journey through the icy waters. Though aren’t there too many tourists?

  5. Boritz says:

    So, nuclear powered ship requires pineapple can “repair” to control the leakage from the pipes. With what do they repair the reactors?

  6. testicules says:

    So that is where they keep the pineapple rings. I was looking for those.

  7. Mike says:

    This is awesome. Thank you!

  8. George Johnson says:

    Looks like that would be a different vacation. Interesting.

  9. Musa says:

    Yum… the food looks wonderful and so does the swimming pool, I want to go.

  10. Archy Bunka says:

    Cool Pics.

  11. perristalsis says:

    I was a boiler technician in the U.S. Navy. If you ever caught just one drop of condensed steam on the top of your head you’d know the tin can is a very good idea until the valve can be isolated and repacked.

  12. John says:

    Looks like a fun ship to be on!

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