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21 Coming Back to Chernobyl

Coming Back to Chernobyl

Posted on April 25, 2011 by team


As you probably know, the Chernobyl NPP is surrounded by a 30-kilometer exclusion zone. To enter it you must have a special permission. But do you actually want it? If you do, see how to enter there after the jump.

If you are coming from Kiev you must pass through the “Dityatki” checkpoint where your passport and all other documents will be carefully checked.

Not far away from the plant there is a fire department and a monument to those who extinguished a fire during the first hours and days after the accident.

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21 Responses to “Coming Back to Chernobyl”

  1. Unknown says:

    Didn’t you read? Some artists from all over Europe who later got banned from Pripyat.

  2. Musa says:

    I wish someone would take more photos of all the residents of the exclusion zone and tell us more about them and how they live.

    I’m fascinated by the fact they haven’t gotten ill and died already. No doubt there are medical people following and studying them to try to find out why they aren’t dead yet.

    Great Post.

    • Musa says:

      I understand that it depends on where they live in the exclusion zone and what levels or radiation they are exposed to.

      Some photographs of them and their homes, gardens and livestock would be great.

  3. testicules says:

    The one woman looks like the toxic avenger

  4. six-string samurai says:

    What was the radiation reading at that woman’s home??

  5. olz says:

    fallout milf

  6. Bill says:

    Small doses of radiation can be beneficial since it kills disease and bacteria as well. I’ve heard reports of people who lived just outside of Hiroshima and Nagasaki living healthy lives well into their 90’s.

  7. Jeff Pigden says:

    Interesting how there aren’t any published studies of the plants & animals, any mutations, etc..

  8. SSSR says:

    2 letters on the stop sign are the same in russian and english.i want to ride on the ferris wheel.

  9. Croissant says:

    I find this post very interesting thanks for sharing. I’m very impressed by that abandonned city

  10. dars says:

    I would love to live withhh Ganya!

  11. Kilroy Was Here says:

    Thanks. Sad, but fascinating…

  12. Left SR says:

    Nature will prevail.

  13. gabby says:

    my respects to all the people who struggled to repair the damage after the explosion

    maybe they didn’t know what they were getting into, but i doubt they would have refused to go even if they knew the danger

  14. Vladimir says:

    Detector shows natural level of “radio emission” 3~30 micro zv/h. But such devices cannot show radio-nuclied’s contamination – it cannot be detected by devices which shows e/m emission.

  15. Well then... says:

    I have been to Pripyat/Chernobyl a few times. What still cracks me up is that lots of people think that, for example in the classroom, there are notebooks left. Or dolls (I see quite a few pictures where there are dolls with burned out eyes laying around). EVERYTHING was looted in the early 90’s. NOTHING was spared. They even took the doors to elevators in the buildings. Every memorabilia that you see in pictures taken today has been put there by the guides of the city, or similar. To keep tourists happy. I find that rather repulsive…

  16. Sad Lee says:

    That is one interesting concept Bill
    I wonder if in 10 years rich people will knock each other over to purchase property in the 30 mile radius.
    Hope I didn’t start a multi billion idea that I’ll never get to cash in for myself.

  17. miss italia says:

    My family foster kids etc and when the disaster happened we had 2 young boys who’s family were affected by the disaster come and live with us in the uk for several months. Dima and seniya r there names, hearing there stories of their situations back home was really touching. Still to this day am in touch with them and we write to eachother every week.

  18. miss italia says:

    My family foster kids etc and when the disaster happened we had 2 young boys who’s family were affected by the disaster come and live with us in the uk for several months. Dima and seniya r there names, hearing there stories of their situations back home was really touching. Still to this day am in touch with them and we write to eachother every week. I was able to learn a lot from them and their lives.

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