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19 How an Aircraft is Souped Up?

How an Aircraft is Souped Up?

Posted on July 26, 2010 by team


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Just imagine that you are sitting in the middle of TU-154M and there are at least 3 tonnes, if not 8, of kerosene under you.

Can imagine what 8 tonnes of kerosene look like? Yeah, quite difficult, it is.

Let’s soup it up?

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Overwhelming majority of fuel tanks are casing fuel tanks. This means that fuel is being pumped into the hollow of wings and there are no special vessels for that; everything is situated in the pressurized section.

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Prior to a plane fueling you need to draw a cupful of gasoline from the fuel system to remove any sediment that may be collected in order to check for the water contained in the fuel tanks.

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19 Responses to “How an Aircraft is Souped Up?”

  1. gustav says:

    first

  2. Baron says:

    second…

  3. xoxo says:

    very random.

  4. Maxim says:

    3th

    how interesting………….

  5. Otis R. Needleman says:

    Neat! Thanks!

  6. wtf says:

    nice, but i will never fly a Tupolev 154 aircraft. since the first one has been introduced in 1972, no doubts that many of them has already enjoyed the best of their flight/service life.

    but today, we are in 2010, time to move forward…

  7. Riley says:

    Cool photos! But i think you mean how an airplane is juiced up XD

  8. DougW says:

    7st!
    Interesting pictures.

  9. Wraith says:

    The fuel is not gasoline. It is kerosene. Piston engines need gasoline (and often the high-octane stuff). Jets usually use kerosene but can use other fuels in an emergency.

  10. TimO says:

    Never seen that before

  11. Just imagine that you are sitting in the middle of TU-154M

    I hope there’s no Kaczyński on board.

  12. Rattata says:

    I have been on a few planes when they’ve been fuelling while passengers are boarding or on-board. It is quite disconcerting when they tell you to leave your belts unbuckled in case of an emergency.

  13. Ivana Benderova says:

    Fuel is never measured in “liters.” This is a common misconception. Always either lbs. or kgs. And “maintenance worker” does not have anything to do with the fuel load requirement for the flight. Is always flight operations planning and subject to final approval by the Captain of the flight.

  14. Testicules says:

    More fuel means a bigger explosion. Especially when the pilots kid is flying the plane.

  15. Ivana Benderova says:

    I am quite certain that any explosion you know has come from your own arseewhole, you dork a$$hole, da..? LMOA!

  16. whodareswins says:

    “The fuel is not gasoline. It is kerosene. Piston engines need gasoline (and often the high-octane stuff). Jets usually use kerosene but can use other fuels in an emergency”

    Piston aero engines use “AVGAS”, jet engines use “AVTUR”

  17. whodareswins says:

    “Fuel is never measured in liters.”

    It is whilst still in the refuelling bowser – it’s only measured in weight when it’s in the aircraft

    • Ivana Benderova says:

      “it’s only measured in weight when it’s in the aircraft”

      And that weight is the only measurement that matters. Now, what again was your point, Einstein??? LOLZ!

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