20 Russian homemade snowmobiles

Russian homemade snowmobiles

Posted on April 14, 2010 by

This bulky machine constructed by one enthusiast retiree from the Russian city of Kirov is powered by the old Yamaha motorcycle engine and is entirely made of scrap. Fiberglass seat was formerly a part of a small carousel, gear shift lever was a part of an unidentified old Coca-Cola souvenir. The front skies are covered with fluoroplastic, a material with extremely low friction factor. The main distinctive feature of this snowmobile is a big wheel instead of a regular for such kind of transport rubber heavy caterpillar made of metal and rubber. For this reason this monster is very light which allows it to drive on fresh crumbly snow.

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Another thing is that this wheel is much less complicated in maintenance and will never cause a stop in the middle of a snow field if one detail is broken, as caterpillar does. The engine is mounted in such a way that it could warm the driver and give some heat to the fuel supply system. Construction works on this unusual snowmobile have taken about one year.


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20 Responses to “Russian homemade snowmobiles”

  1. whodareswins says:


  2. whodareswins says:

    That was the first time I’ve been first

  3. jpr says:

    McGyver is alive and lives in Russia. Very cool machines every single one of them.

  4. Macsen says:

    Cool ingenuity! I could sure use one of those today, as we had a blizzard last night, and there’s more to come!

    • Boritz says:

      Besides unguarded propellers, most of the machines have exposed belts/pulleys and chain/sprockets just waiting to take a bite out of the driver! Scary!

      • Swede says:

        You will be safe if you have ushanka and valenkis on, and vodka inside.

      • Macsen says:

        What is life with out a little adventure?!!
        But, then again, my attitude has resulted in every bone in both my hands having been broken at least once (some several times), surgery on my right wrist, 3 fingers mangled by going through a table saw blade (the surgeon rebuilt them very well), a chunk of one finger sliced off, then sewn back on, and much more. As well, a couple of years ago, in my village, I got into an accident with my Toyota truck and, as I wasn’t wearing my seat belt, was thrown 50 plus meters down the road, got up, and went to help the guy who hit me (his VW Golf was a bit mangled).
        Even the local bull-riders (this is cattle country) think I’m crazy!

        • Macsen says:

          Oh, and I have a lathe and milling machine set up in my living room, so I can do machining while watching TV, or listening to music!
          Now, if I could find a woman who was into metal work, and didn’t mind living in a machine shop, I would have it made…..

        • Cracker says:

          A Toyota truck in cow country?! Is that even possible?

        • manta says:

          U got my respect dude, I’m 21 and never broke any bone. Don’t ever wanna know how that feels

  5. Cracker says:

    Very cool, but I wouldn’t ride the propeller driven ones. There’s no guard or cage around the propeller. If you wrecked you’d probably be killed by the blade.

  6. Frank says:

    Russians can learn much from Quebec.


    amazing – operates in 6ft of snow no problem. Winters here seem same as yours.

  7. jspace says:

    This is exactly the same kind of stuff they did in Roseau, MN in the 1950s. Classic snowmobiles are kinda big in my area.

  8. stackofbeat says:

    bandwidth exceeded! :(

  9. Circ says:

    Come on guys, this rain of “Upgrade to Pro” images is just embarrassing :(

  10. Gaby says:

    i’m a white stranger

  11. kaos polos says:

    Great article. Looking forward to reading more posts by you. Thanks.

  12. olie says:

    you can see how these guys got into space first

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