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20 Nowhere But In Mosselprom. Old Posters

Nowhere But In Mosselprom. Old Posters

Posted on October 15, 2009 by


Russian commercials

Because the majority of advertising materials in the USSR were of a political propagandizing nature, the many examples of simple commercial advertising are often overlooked.

These ads for goods and services were pervasive, with many having been published during the New Economic Politics (NEP) period (1921-1928). Later on, various government enterprises produced their own advertisement campaigns. Word of mouth advertising campaigns were also spread less formally by private masters and “hack workers” while radio ads were fairly common.

While many of the ad slogans produced in this era were rather uniform, (All smoke the certain brand’s cigarettes, Ask for that everywhere, Eat, Drink, Keep, Fly…), there are some rather interesting if not entertaining quips such as, “Nowhere but in Mosselprom”, “You are not a USSR citizen if you aren’t a Dobrolet’s stockholder”, and the everlasting slogan of Mayakovsky: “Better pacifiers don’t exist that’s why I’ll suck them till I get old”.

Russian commercials 1

These ads present a wonderful collection of the type and style of art that was produced under the creative repression of the times.
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Russian commercials 2

The collection consists of ads from both the USSR and tsarist Russia. The elegantly detailed pictures easily distinguish those from tsarist Russia. Generally speaking the posters in whole target the middle class, the main buying sector of the period.

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20 Responses to “Nowhere But In Mosselprom. Old Posters”

  1. polish jew says:

    heh…I love the one with the black guy!

  2. Mr. Rabinovich says:

    Soviet advertisement is not so good.

  3. CONNIE says:

    I have to agree with responses one and two.

  4. cia says:

    Advertising says a lot about a country.
    This blog is to people interested in Russia, like catnip is to cats.

    (An advertising slogan for the blog.)

  5. eds says:

    Really interesting, so often advertisements reflect on there intended consumers.

  6. castleahh says:

    how can this stuff be advertised to the middle class, i thought the whole point of creating a communist country was to get rid of the Bourgeois, the middle class, and have the working class,the proletariat, rule? you mean to tell me that isn’t so, i don’t believe it.

    i do like these ads though, the Aeroflot one is interesting, so is the toothpaste one. but what is real interesting is all the cigar and cigarette ads. i do miss seeing them here.

  7. Taupey says:

    Interesting – Thank You!

  8. Gerry says:

    For me the fascinating one is about Armand Hammer and his pencil factory (circa 1920s). Most of his (American)family settled in Rossiya, his father as a Comintern administrator. Armand as a specially exempt ‘capitalist’ and advisor to the regime. His large ‘house’ along the Mocba river is often pointed out to tourists. Seldom mentioned is his family’s work in Soviet espionage for the ‘Organs’ (whole family communist, father a founding member of the 1st International). They mainly did Int’l money laundering for the Soviets.

  9. Noel Wiggins says:

    this just proves that there was once upon a time when graphic design really looked good and made a difference with what you experienced in advertising thanks for sharing the link!…

    Thanks and Regards

    Noel for Nopun.com
    a graphic design studio

  10. Iz says:

    Where is tsarist Russia ads?

  11. I love the old style of ads, it’s not photoshopped to perfection and the rawness of it really appeals to me.

  12. Otis R. Needleman says:

    The guy in the Chlorodont ad reminds me of my brother Bill!

  13. Yuri says:

    I think these are all fake. And actually made after perestroika

  14. m says:

    Accually, using an icon of soviet union is unlegal. why its on your title?

  15. Kate H says:

    So dark, with a pervasive ‘risk’ factor..is that what it’s like in Russia?

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