171 Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses

Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses

Posted on January 6, 2009 by


Russian Abandoned Nuclear Polar Lighthouse 1

Russian Northern coast is a vast territory lays for a few thousand of miles and all this coastline is inside the Polar Circle. Long polar winters mean no daylight at all, just one day changes another without any sign of the Sun rising above the horizon. There is only polar night for 100 day a year.

But across this Northern coast there was always a short way for the cargo boats to travel from Eastern part of Russia to the Western. Now this trip can be made fairly easy with the appearance of all the satellite navigation equipment like GPS and others, but during the Soviet Era they had none of this.

So, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union decided to build a chain of lighthouses to guide ships finding their way in the dark polar night across uninhabited shores of the Soviet Russian Empire. So it has been done and a series of such lighthouses has been erected. They had to be fully autonomous, because they were situated hundreds and hundreds miles aways from any populated areas. After reviewing different ideas on how to make them work for a years without service and any external power supply, Soviet engineers decided to implement atomic energy to power up those structures. So, special lightweight small atomic reactors were produced in limited series to be delivered to the Polar Circle lands and to be installed on the lighthouses. Those small reactors could work in the independent mode for years and didn't require any human interference, so it was very handy in the situation like this. It was a kind of robot-lighthouse which counted itself the time of the year and the length of the daylight, turned on its lights when it was needed and sent radio signals to near by ships to warn them on their journey. It all looks like ran out the sci-fi book pages, but so they were.

Then, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the unattended automatic lighthouses did it job for some time, but after some time they collapsed too. Mostly as a result of the hunt for the metals like copper and other stuff which were performed by the looters. They didn't care or maybe even didn't know the meaning of the "Radioactive Danger" sign and ignored them, breaking in and destroying the equipment. It sounds creepy but they broke into the reactors too causing all the structures to become radioactively polluted.

Those photos are from the trip to the one of such structures, the most close to the populated areas of the Russian far east. Now, there are signs "RADIOACTIVITY" written with big white letters on the approaching paths to the structure but they don't stop the abandoned exotics lovers.


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Russian Abandoned Nuclear Polar Lighthouse 2

Russian Abandoned Nuclear Polar Lighthouse 3


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171 Responses to “Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses”

  1. Keroro says:

    If they there fully-automatic, then why there is a toilet, and daily log at the pictures? O_o

    • harry says:

      yeh thats what i thought, but i guess if its the closest one to civilisation then maybe some where occupied.

      • hilo says:

        i had exactly the same thought
        those books look like log books for mayb a coastal watch?
        or for just monitoring the power..

      • Miss India says:

        OMG Russians are so poor they can’t even maintain thier own coastline and lighthouses. Its such a pity. Is that why there has been a recent surge in ship wreck, sunken submarine in russian waters? :(

        • well, of course my good sir says:

          Yes, that is EXACTLY why the submarines sunk, because the lighthouses were out of order. Lighthouses are crucial for submarine navigation.

        • Pocket Soap Box says:

          Anonymity won’t save you from Karma dropping by to kick you in the ass. Lighten up.

          • PNutts says:

            Agreed. People spend more time making pithy comments than thinking.

            For all the haters who replied to MI, I don’t remember when submarines were prevented from using terrestrial navigation aids (visual and radio per the article). Thousands of miles of rugged coastland, polar night 1/3 of the year, no guarantee of a cloudless sky… Nope. I see no reason to pop the periscope or surface for any reason. I guess all their skippers were Sean Connery or Captain Nemo (pick the pithy comment that best suits your generation).

        • kin says:

          “But across this Northern coast there was always a short way for the cargo boats to travel from Eastern part of Russia to the Western. Now this trip can be made fairly easy with the appearance of all the satellite navigation equipment like GPS and others, but during the Soviet Era they had none of this…”
          It became simple not sense it to use.
          Whence such stereotypes about Russia? Listen less that speak to you and think the head more))
          English language I know badly – transfer in promt…

    • Vickx says:

      I was thinking the exact same thing!

    • Alex says:

      well they were fully-automatic, which doesn’t make ‘em maintenance-free. And the maintenance people aren’t robots – they need to go pee and poo, ‘specially when maintenance might stretch for a week or two…

    • Lola says:

      Daily logs and toilets are expected. The lighthouses themselves were probably erected prior to the Soviet’s completion of design for self sufficiency. There would have been lighthouse keepers until the work was completed. Logs would be unnecessary after that point but until that point it’s understandable.

      Side Note: Even if everything had been designed and assembled and set to use without the need for people there would still have been someone needed to oversee it initially to make sure that it was working properly. That person may have only been there for a week but he would have needed to use the bathroom in that time frame :)

    • Kelvin says:

      it is the MYS Aniva lighthouse. it was originally manned, but the soviets replaced it with an RTG reactor so that it became automatic. it was abandoned not only radioactive but has a giant pool of mercury lubricant.

  2. anon says:

    I can’t remember where I first read this, but my understanding is that the lighthouses were powered by big RTGs, not by mini-reactors. Makes sense to me since as long as you have enough Sr-90 or some other suitable isotope, it’s much easier and safer to make a simple RTG than to design an entire reactor. Plus I can’t imagine a fully automatic reactor

    • Matthe_B says:

      Correct, they were RTGs. They used Pu238 as the heat source.

      • G.R.L. Cowan says:

        They did build automated nuclear reactors, as we know in Canada because one of them, Cosmos 954, deorbited and strewed itself over granite terrain. Searching for it with radiation detectors was said to be like looking for a red nose in a sunset.

        I think the lighthouse RTGs were powered by 90-Sr, not 238-Pu, because some of the wreckers got toasted, which plutonium can’t really do. Also 90-Sr is a lot easier to get.

        Either way, it’s like a reactor that is always at 100 percent, even after you cut it open and spread it around. An actual fission reactor is much less dangerous.

  3. Max says:

    Where is this? Does anyone know?

  4. Leo Petr says:

    “Радиация”? I hope the photographer brought a Geiger counter with them. One wouldn’t want to die of radiation poisoning.

  5. Marshall says:

    clean up the mess and radiation, it would make for an awesome hideout for a james bond villain..especially the first photo looks like a rocket would be launched from the light house

  6. President Putin says:

    Yes, look how “good” it worked on my old friend Litvinenko! :D

  7. CK says:

    jokes with Putinium ?
    hehe

    anyway, nice pics and lovely abandonned place !

  8. [...] This is quite amazing to me. Never heard of these before. The great northern coast of Russia is inside the Arctic Circle, and the shoreline is hundreds of miles from civilisation almost the whole way along. Lighthouses were required for the coast, because it’s a handy passage but it spends a hundred days of the year in near-permanent night. The problems were that they’d be miles from anywhere, and couldn’t realistically be supplied or crewed. [...]

  9. [...] fabricar Faros nucleares. Cada uno con un pequeño reactor nuclear que genera electricidad. Problema resuelto. [...]

  10. Schoschie says:

    Second anon’s comment. I presume a fully-contained nuclear reactor would be much too expensive for this purpose. It’s much more likely they used large RTGs ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator ). These are the same type of power sources that power space probes such as the Voyagers. They can last for many decades. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_program#Power )

  11. [...] and pick up a comic or two that he’s written. You will NOT be disappointed. Oh and head over HERE for the original [...]

  12. Snel says:

    Sure looks nice.. Think i’m going to do some exstensive research about those locations & pay them a visit too :p

  13. [...] Abandoned Russian Lighthouses – a series of crumbling structures in beautiful natural surroundings. Add a healthy dollop of poverty and tragedy: After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the unattended automatic lighthouses did [the] job for some time, but after some time they collapsed too. Mostly as a result of the hunt for the metals like copper and other stuff which were performed by the looters. They didn’t care or maybe even didn’t know the meaning of the “Radioactive Danger” sign and ignored them, breaking in and destroying the equipment. [...]

  14. [...] great pictures here at Englishrussia.com posted under [...]

  15. Constantine says:

    Indeed, they were powered by RTGs, not mini-reactors.

  16. Bilosh says:

    Is that a nuclear light house in you pocket or are you just glading to see me?

  17. [...] tonight that grew out of an idea I had a few weeks back when it merged with and twisted with this [Russian Nuclear powered lighthouses in the Arctic Circle, what if you had to be there, to watch [...]

  18. [...] – the power for it?  My guess is nuclear.  If the Soviets can build nuclear-powered lighthouses, anything is possible. My posts aboutChurch Computers Food and travel God House Music [...]

  19. Leif says:

    Very cool. Do you have higher resolution copies of these that I could have?

  20. jason says:

    James Bond The world is not enough!

  21. [...] fyrhus var atomdrivna! Detta för att de var tvungna att kunna lysa i flera år utan att ses till och de låg ofta [...]

  22. w says:

    I would paint it pink with a purple tip and draw a big hand on the shaft

  23. [...] nuclear lighthouses English Russia Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses __________________ Reduce, reuse, and recycle [...]

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  25. ColinLaney says:

    “why there is a toilet, and daily log at the pictures?”

    I suspect a maintenance crew is supposed to visit periodically.

  26. [...] English Russia » Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses [...]

  27. [...] Exploring a disused Russian nuclear lighthouse [...]

  28. No says:

    I was thinking the same thing. Only problem is, I suspect it’s a lot easier find a buyer for copper than lighthouse lenses.

    I’m not sure if I hope the looters die of leukemia or not.

  29. dave james says:

    It would be very interesting if this website could post a bit more detail on these facilities, such as how long did they function before they were vandalized.

  30. [...] Polar Nuclear Lighthouses – One from Warren Ellis, scary, but interesting too! [...]

  31. [...] have irradiated sections of the arctic by stripping the shielding from nuclear lighthouses abandoned after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Yes, nuclear lighthouses. (via [...]

  32. Math says:

    I think it’s beautiful, in a decaying, post-apocalyptic way. Brings stories & images to my mind.

  33. [...] link muy interesante, impresiona la inmensidad del faro http://englishrussia.com/?p=2198 [...]

  34. [...] this day, I learned that there were nuclear powered lighthouses in Russia. Imagine being a lighthouse above the arctic circle with no one living in you, only [...]

  35. [...] English Russia has photos: “Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses“. [...]

  36. Tonis says:

    Really really interesting to see the former soviet flag of Estonia on the pictures. The one with blue waves on the red background. Greetings from Estonia!

  37. YorTheTimeHunter says:

    what a awesome piece of history..one could make a great getaway home out of one of these lighthouses

  38. [...] English Russia » Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses (tags: Abandoned Russia ColdWar AtomAge) [...]

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  44. Borat says:

    Nuclear-class light houses. I want one.
    Besides, radioactivity never harmed anybody.
    At least that is what my Dear Leader says to me over the cities civil defense public announcement system.

  45. [...] Faro nuclear abandonado en la costa rusa en English Russia. [...]

  46. [...] 13, 2009 by portalhispano La anotación Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses (Faros nucleares abandonados en el ártico ruso), ilustra con varias fotos el estado de deterioro [...]

  47. [...] q fazer com um farol cheio de lixo nuclear ? larga lá… q se [...]

  48. [...] Die Russen haben Rohstoffdiebstahl-Probleme bei ihren atomgetriebenen Polarmeer-Leuchttürmen. Und beim Diebstahl ist dann auch mal ein bisschen Radioaktivität freigesetzt worden. [...]

  49. [...] 13, 2009 by darkslope Automated nuclear-powered lighthouses were built along the freezing northern coast of Russia to guide cargo ships, but they all fell into [...]

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  51. Poor Insane says:

    Some Guy did want to know where this lighthouse is located –
    this lighthouse is the more or lesser famous Aniva Lighthouse

    Here it is located:

    http://www.panoramio.com/map/#lt=46.019317&ln=143.413811&z=4&k=2

    and here is a little bit background story:

    http://www.sakhalin.ru/Engl/Region/lighthouses/lighthouses.htm

    http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/lighthouse/sak.htm

    have a nice day folks

  52. [...] lijkt sciencefiction uit te jaren 50 te zijn maar ze bestaan echt. nucleair aangedraven robotische vuur torens. Ze staan langs de noordkust van Rusland om de noordelijk scheepvaart route veiliger te maken. Maar [...]

  53. [...] gerade mit Interesse diesen Beitrag über russische (bzw. ursprünglich sowjetische) Leuchttürme, die fast autonom arbeiteten und in welche kleine Atom-Reaktoren eingebaut wurden, da sie hunderte [...]

  54. [...] fronte al reportage segnalato da William Gibson sul suo blog, anche il fantasmagorico utilizzo letterario [...]

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  58. Joe says:

    Interesting but its just sad to note these are abandoned and left to be radio active.

    Are there any effort to clean it up.

  59. [...] Right now, these structures can be visited, if you don’t care about you or your future kids growing up extra members—the lighthouses are, obviously, contaminated with radiation. [English Russia] [...]

  60. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses Russian Northern coast is a vast territory lays for a few thousand of miles and all this coastline is inside the Polar Circle. Long polar winters mean no daylight at all, just one day changes another without any sign of the Sun rising above the horizon. There is only polar night for 100 day a year. But across this Northern coast there was always a short way for the cargo boats to travel from Eastern part of Russia to the Western. Now this trip can be made fairly easy with the appearance of all the satellite navigation equipment like GPS and others, but during the Soviet Era they had none of this. So, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union decided to build a chain of lighthouses to guide ships finding their way in the dark polar night across uninhabited shores of the Soviet Russian Empire. So it has been done and a series of such lighthouses has been erected. They had to be fully autonomous, because they were situated hundreds and hundreds miles aways from any populated areas. After reviewing different ideas on how to make them work for a years without service and any external power supply, Soviet engineers decided to implement atomic energy to power up those structures. So, special lightweight small atomic reactors were produced in limited series to be delivered to the Polar Circle lands and to be installed on the lighthouses. Those small reactors could work in the independent mode for years and didn’t require any human interference, so it was very handy in the situation like this. It was a kind of robot-lighthouse which counted itself the time of the year and the length of the daylight, turned on its lights when it was needed and sent radio signals to near by ships to warn them on their journey. It all looks like ran out the sci-fi book pages, but so they were. Then, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the unattended automatic lighthouses did it job for some time, but after some time they collapsed too. Mostly as a result of the hunt for the metals like copper and other stuff which were performed by the looters. They didn’t care or maybe even didn’t know the meaning of the “Radioactive Danger” sign and ignored them, breaking in and destroying the equipment. It sounds creepy but they broke into the reactors too causing all the structures to become radioactively polluted. Those photos are from the trip to the one of such structures, the most close to the populated areas of the Russian far east. Now, there are signs “RADIOACTIVITY” written with big white letters on the approaching paths to the structure but they don’t stop the abandoned exotics lovers. More pictures here. [...]

  61. [...] Right now, these structures can be visited, if you don’t care about you or your future kids growing up extra members—the lighthouses are, obviously, contaminated with radiation. [English Russia] [...]

  62. Tim says:

    Yes surely going to see the lighthouses would make ur babys be born NAKED!

  63. [...] gaussling in CounterCurrent, Nuclear, Oddities, Science. trackback Here is an obscure topic- the Nuclear Lighthouse. Seems the Russians set up unmanned lighthouses in remote coastal locations in the north. These [...]

  64. [...] Here are a few of the pictures… Click here for the full page. [...]

  65. DLP says:

    I am going to start a monthly calender with “best of” Abondoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses.
    Enjoy your favorite Nuclear Lighthouse by the month! $19.95 (??Roubles).

  66. DLP says:

    What is more detrimental to a persons health – Nuclear Lighthouses or the “Quality Russian Dating Service” (advertised with this article)?

  67. [...] seem to have this unique penchant for not leaving well enough alone, and when we don’t we get this sort of [...]

  68. ScottP says:

    The RTG were made from Strontium-90 and quite deadly if exposed.

  69. O'Shnall says:

    Can you imagine SMALL nuclear reactor for each lighthouse? how much was all this at soviets time?? There is a company just started to promote silimar reactors for sale and they are few tens of millins of $$$.

  70. [...] les visiter, si vous n’avez rien contre les radiations, qui sont évidemment partout autour. [English Russia] Partager sur Viadeo |  [...]

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  72. [...] > > Exactly, every house should have one Lighthouses should anyway… http://www.englishrussia.com/?p=2198 [...]

  73. [...] Nukleáris világítótornyok. [...]

  74. [...] there anything that the soviets didn’t Nukeafy, but I guess in that time period the U.S. was pretty much doing the same [...]

  75. [...] cosas tan interesantes, el metro en Moscú es genial, y algo que completamente me volo la mente: Faros impulsados por energía nuclear con un twist, ya todos estos faros han sido saqueados ¿Donde quedaron los reactores nucleares? Y [...]

  76. wynnstate says:

    Hey, don’t be a douche, Wilson. Paul wasn’t saying anything about making a fission bomb. He said weapon (well “wepon” actually). To my knowledge, the strontium used for RITEGs could never be enriched to produce a fissile material, because Sr-90 doesn’t have the nuclear properties to be fissile. However, I believe he was referring to a dirty bomb. That is, he is worried somebody will take a few pounds of the radioisotope and disperse it via conventional explosive for nefarious purposes.

  77. [...] architecture – Verlassene atomreaktorbetriebene Leuchttürmearchitectureand anything else that matters… 20/1/2009Verlassene atomreaktorbetriebene Leuchttürme Category: auf reisen Von Val_der_Ama um 09:13 Damit die Schiffe den Weg entlang des Nordens der Sovietunion finden konnten, hat man früher, also vor der Erfindung des GPS und des Endes der Sovietunion ein paar Leuchttürme gebaut. Betrieben werden die Dinger von kleinen Atomreaktoren. Mehr Bilder und der Artikel dazu. [...]

  78. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses (English Russia) [...]

  79. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses [English Russia] [...]

  80. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses Once upon a time, back when people in Russia used big moustaches and sent other people to Siberia, there were no GPS or tacky cellphones. But they had atomic lighthouses to light the Artic shores. [...]

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  82. Vadim says:

    I have visited one of these sites in Archangelsk region. The site was much more desroyed and looted compared with this one. As in this case radioisotope thermoelectric generators (most dangerous agregates) :) were dismandled.
    There were build around 1000 such lighthouses in Soviet Union. Many on them have been dismantled. It is also interesting that some of litghhouses can not be located, because of the dismanagement.

  83. [...] quieren ver las fotos completas y leer más, entren a: http://englishrussia.com/?p=2198 Written by admin in: Jovenes | Etiquetas:juegos, Julio Cesar Lopez Zamora, Rusia, T&G, [...]

  84. Da says:

    That’s Ukraine

  85. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses [...]

  86. [...] σε μορφώσω και λίγο. Ιδού πως λειτουργούσαν οι φάροι των σωβιετικών. Ε? [...]

  87. [...] Podéis echad un vistazo a estas espeluznantes fotografías del estado de las instalaciones. [...]

  88. [...] naturally, I was sucked right in when I found a post titled ‘Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses‘. Boy oh boy was I not [...]

  89. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses Yes, real light houses powered by nuclear reactors! [...]

  90. lorenew says:

    Good post Russ…

  91. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses January 6, 2009 [...]

  92. paul smiyh says:

    A dirty bomb is not hard to make and any person could probably do it! Jack ass!

  93. [...] Russia built a chain of NUCLEAR LIGHTHOUSES in the far north! http://englishrussia.com/?p=2198 [...]

  94. [...] more photos at English Russia You can leave a response, or trackback from your own [...]

  95. nickolauz sheski says:

    Not very dangerous to visit, half life only 30yrs, long past its use by date, no activity anymore.

  96. marco says:

    Are there raw DIAMONDS on photo n.10 near the logbook??

  97. [...] -Abandonado faro nuclear- Completamente deteriorado está situado en Rusia [...]

  98. [...] some of the experiments. There’s something fascinating about abandoned buildings, especially abandoned Soviet atomic lighthouses, call me old fashioned but I love a good [...]

  99. [...] a Latin phrase for "Seize the Night." I like because it’s a play on words, visual, multi-linguistic joke that works on several different levels, and I know that the Leo will find is [...]

  100. [...] not only automated, but nuclear powered. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, people began to strip them for metal, including the radiation [...]

  101. [...] leave a comment » Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses [...]

  102. [...] is really cool, but doesn’t sound like a great place to visit: http://englishrussia.com/?p=2198 a few seconds ago from [...]

  103. [...] read about this location first on English-Russia. He has interior photos taken by an urban explorer, though none that are particularly striking. It [...]

  104. rajshree says:

    very interesting n creative…..liked it!!

  105. Wow, I wonder how many other abandoned nuclear reactors there are in the world, just sitting around.

  106. [...] probes do. or various Russian telemetry devices and unmanned light houses right here on earth… English Russia Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses I dont think the little UAVs with 2-3 hour fly time would use something like this but the bigger [...]

  107. Great posting. Thanks for useful information.

  108. The official site for the original addicting helicopter game is at http://www.officialhelicoptergame.com/ – someone scored 11408 on helicopter game and they have video proof on that site on the helicopter game high score page!

  109. That is lots of inspirational stuff. Never knew that opinions could be this varied. Thanks for all of the enthusiasm to provide you with such helpful information here.

  110. Dylan says:

    Hey awsome, now i know were to get some free nucealer reactors, lol.

  111. [...] Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses/   No Comments [...]

  112. Funny, I actually had this on my mind a few days ago and now I come across your job.

  113. joneame.net says:

    Faros nucleares soviéticos abandonados en el Polo…

    La Unión Soviética decidió construir una cadena de faros para guiar a los barcos encontrar su camino en la noche polar a través de las costas deshabitadas del país. Tenían que tener absoluta autonomía, porque estaban situadas a cientos de kiló…

  114. [...] Very neat and is another example of how much was abandoned in 1991 along with crazy projects like contaminated nuclear lighthouses near the top of the world. Posted in Science « New Nixon Tapes released [...]

  115. EL says:

    Cool…wish to visit the place,http://fundoomails.com/

  116. webmaster says:

    omg most of the responses most of the people create are usually such stoner comments, now and again i wonder if they truthfully go through the content material pieces and reports prior to posting or if perhaps they basically gloss over the blog titles and publish first thing comes up. in any case, it’s satisfying to read through ingenious commentary here and there compared to the exact same, out-of-date post vomit which i usually see online

  117. That’s all I could think of…can you answer them?! heheh!! >_<

  118. I liked your article and the suggestions that are provided. There are plenty of ideas out there that are both savvy and not good. If you have any more recommendations concerning natural health or associated topics, that would be great. Keep up the good writing!

  119. I like your post and i want to tell you that i really don’t knew about something like “Nuclear Light House” that is situated in Russia. I am impressed with the Russian nuclear technology that they have very small nuclear reactor that can be place in remote areas where no human can work as these reactors(power plants) work remotely. Thanks for the interesting and informative post…

  120. [...] [...] Tags: abandoned, Architecture, Arctic Circle, atomic energy, Communist Party, Lighthouse, [...]

  121. kin says:

    “Can you without any hesitation believe anything that came out of the Soviet Union as anything but propaganda?”
    in the same way as well as in america – all it only propagation adjusting friend against the friend the people. the purpose – control over the population, over their mood. and we with ease give in to it… It is sad and is silly

  122. Coat Rack says:

    I hope that they cleaned up any radio active material that was left behind. In a way it is a shame that lighthouses of become an obsolete structure.

  123. [...] Tyto fotky jsou z jednoho „výletu“ k majáku, který je nejblíže civilizaci na dalekém východě Ruska. Více obrázků si můžete prohlédnout zde. [...]

  124. Hot Tub says:

    really interesting pictures thanks for posting

  125. [...] English Russia В» Abandoned Russian Polar Nuclear Lighthouses Jan 6, 2009 … Russian Abandoned Nuclear Polar Lighthouse 20. Russian Abandoned Nuclear Polar Lighthouse 21. photos … [...]

  126. Sprmcandy says:

    How,interesting. thx.

  127. That was terrific! Thank you for pictures. Some are kinda scary..

  128. Were these real nuclear reactors or radioisotope generators? There’s a big difference, as RTGs are much simpler, require less supervision and can easily be designed to be safe even if everything around the cask breaks down. Would love to have more information…

  129. Yakov Lanskiy says:

    The old lighthouse tradition required an operator. This operator would have the additional duty of not only receiving distress reports, but also reporting on ships, especially ships in distress. In the old old days the operators would go out and try to rescue sailors in distress if he/she could. Lighthouse operator was a boring job, kinda like a forest ranger in a tower whose job was to spot forest fires. It was a necessary job. Making the houses nuclear was a really good idea as no firewood would ever have to be chopped, another duty of the lighthouse operator. Of course if he/she was out chopping firewood, he would not be on watch, his/her primary duty. I like the nuclear idea…cheap compact energy that lasts forever and is abundant…just needs an operator. If you are gonna spend a million roubles of your taxpayers…the people’s money, ya better have a peoples civil employee looking after it.

  130. Rafael says:

    One of the most beautiful lighthouse I’ve seen.
    rafael
    http://www.youtube.com/mylighthouses

  131. Christine Williams says:

    I am interested in a position as lighthouse keeper, restorer, and historical aid, for the country and/or state if not owned privatly. I have been to Russia and am familiar with her beauty but the coast and lighthouses are my long time love to put my effort toward. If anyone knows a willing lighthouse with my name on it so-to-speak, send me an e-mail and instructions to [email protected] dosvyadonya!
    Christine Williams – Oregon/USA -Geography Major

  132. Peter says:

    According to Barents Observer Russia is cleaning up all the nuclear powered light houses and refitting them with wind turbines and solar panels http://barentsobserver.com/en/arctic/2013/04/no-nuclear-lighthouses-arctic-2015-12-04

  133. Chris says:

    Beautiful pictures of this lighthouse. Located close Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk island…

  134. Service Houston Electrician says:

    Favorite all images and little statues of these light houses, it has a lonely but, strong look against the elements saving the ships and it’s occupants

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