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49 The Parking Vandalism

The Parking Vandalism

Posted on February 7, 2008 by


once on the parking in Lithuania 1

One morning, when those car owners came to the parking they have found that each and every car’s windshield was smashed with something. They don’t have a clue who could do this and why, but he didn’t miss a car.

once on the parking in Lithuania 2

once on the parking in Lithuania 3


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49 Responses to “The Parking Vandalism”

  1. Here Wego says:

    first?

  2. chicken says:

    Its good to see someone else in the planet dislikes cars like I do :O

  3. lithuanian says:

    Plates appear to be Latvian.

  4. Roman says:

    And the reason was that most of them have EU registration plates?

  5. D says:

    So who ends up paying for the repairs?

  6. olek says:

    im tellin you it was a n****r! Every1 was like n****r what? and the n****r was like n***a please….

  7. noname says:

    I only count about 17 smashed windshields. A lot of them are repeats and there are clearly many cars without smashed windows.

  8. mattheus says:

    Thise are Latvian cars – probably is it in Riga – unfortunately in Riga over half of population are russians who have no roots there and so some of them are doing criminal things. In Russia there would be much more old rusty Lada’s and Volgas and other Soviet time cars. Latvian people have much better ecconomic situation.

    • Boris Abramov says:

      LOL :)

    • superphil0 says:

      well I don’t agree on that one… In Russia one can also see very nice cars I even heard that a “Volkswagen” is the most popular car to buy there. Especcially in the big cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg you don’t really see very much of those old Ladas anymore, at least I had the expression. Of course, in general the economic situation might be better in Latvia than in RUssia, but Russia is without doubt catching up.

    • Tim says:

      Fantastic conclusions! maybe you can tell the name of the rootless russian who did it? just looking on those photos, hein?

    • Justin says:

      I was just thinking, how long would it take before some silly little nazi from Latvia would balame this on poor ethnic minorities, who are already abused and discriminated against by his fascist government. Not that long, I see.

      • talking beaver says:

        And I was just wondering why it is taking so long for Justin/Boris Abramov crackpot twins to show up with with “poor ethnic majorities abused by fascist government” thingy again. :)

        So there you are. Thank you!

        P.S. By the way, you would find it interesting to study statistical data on crimes there and see what share of those has been committed by ex-Soviets. You would be amused. ;)

        Don’t forget that Soviet Union / Russia was a society controlled by criminal totalitarian regime for decades. This unavoidably shaped mentality and behavior of individuals, as it was necessary to survive. To deny it is to engage in Politically Correct wishful thinking. If it would be so, many sciences, like Anthropology or Sociology would not be be needed.

        • Justin says:

          “Dont forget that Soviet Union / Russia was a society controlled by criminal totalitarian regime for decades”

          And Latvia wasn’t in the Soviet Union for decades?

          • talking beaver says:

            Yes, unfortunately it was, and we can still see and feel the debilitating effect of Soviet rule and it will take many years to get rid of it.

            • Justin says:

              So we are in agreement, the Soviet rule “unavoidably shaped mentality and behavior” of Latvian individuals? But those smelly Russians, Jews and Gypsies must still be blamed, is that right?

              Now dosn’t that remind you of nazi germany in the 30s?

              • British Communist says:

                I’ve been working in Latvia in a biggest hotel in Riga and I can tell one thing – I never imagined British are actually so badly mannered when they are abroad. Most of the time they are completely drunk. Some of them are enjoying public urinating – the bins were their favorite, but they did not mind doing it through their windows and at least three times they were caught wanking in corridors, besides one was caught urinating on Freedom Monument in City centre. They always initiate fights with locals – once three chaps ran in a hotel and showed off how they managed to beat up four Russians on the street, about ten times during the year worked there I had to call police because they would not stop fighting in the hotel with other guests. They also are the most active consumers of prostitution services, I mean some of them were doing it three time a night, I know it because all visitors have to register in reception before they can proceed to the guest rooms. Overall on a scale 1-10 British cultural level from my personal experience is 1 and a half.

                So why don’t you look at your own nation first…oh, I forgot, there is barely any British left in UK :D:D:D

              • jamesdean says:

                I had worked around British tourists for some time here in United States. Generally they keep to themselves and are quite reserved in attitude and manners. I had never seen them drunk or misbehaving in any way. I believe its a selective crew that travels to Latvia. Perhaps, this is their perception of the country or some sort of sex-travel thing where they are conditioned to behave as may be a case of adolescent-like group peer pressure. Being a country of immigrants, many accept Brits in US as model whites (Madison avenue driven image is quite persistent) and will easily accept them for “front office” type of work, especially in big cities. However, as people, they are generally quite problematic if one “scratches” them deeper with appearances being quite misleading. P.S. Goes for anyone.

  9. guys i have a simple explanation for you as ive seen this many times in russian / other neighborhoods of NYC. every time there is a new windows or tire shop opens up there are mysteriously windows broken and tires slashed within a few blocks areas.

    it might be done by someone else but more likely that a new shop just wants some new business and sends someone to leave “flyers” on everyones windshield ;)

    • Louise says:

      Yes check out the auto glass repairmen in town. Unscrupulous ones will scatter gravel on highways with fast drivers, so that the bits fly up and shatter the windshields of the cars.

      This is one reason why unfettered capitalism is bad.

  10. TrZ says:

    It happened in Latvia (a small state on the coast of The Baltic Sea, right next to Russia and not far from Poland, Sweden and Finland – for those who do not know much geography).
    As far as I remember, the guy, who did it, got caught. He was just drunk half out of his senses and that was the only motive.

  11. Franz says:

    … carglass people were around…

  12. Luigi Vercotti says:

    Tyler Durden did it!

  13. Tim says:

    As some people alreadry mentionned, this is not Russia on pictures. By the way I saw almost the same in France once, in Choisy-le-roi near Paris. The whole street was like that, with broken glasses.

  14. Dixieland says:

    It would be time to lock and load…

  15. Eris says:

    Latvia has its own, domestic bunch of dumbfvcks, always ready for such deeds without any Russian help.

  16. talking beaver says:

    Compared to what?

    If compared to Russia – it definitely rules big time.

    ;)

  17. LT says:

    “LT” on the plates means Lithuania, not Latvia. It is another country, yet former SU republic as well. There are almost no Russians in Lithuania, by the way. Latvian plates are marked as “LV”

  18. Louise says:

    And Springfield hates Shelbyville.

  19. Max Rivera says:

    I bet was the local windshield seller who did it!!!!

  20. What about British culture says:

    I’ve been working in Latvia in a biggest hotel in Riga and I can tell one thing – I never imagined British are actually so badly mannered when they are abroad. Most of the time they are completely drunk. Some of them are enjoying public urinating – the bins were their favorite, but they did not mind doing it through their windows and at least three times they were caught wanking in corridors, besides one was caught urinating on Freedom Monument in City centre. They always initiate fights with locals – once three chaps ran in a hotel and showed off how they managed to beat up four Russians on the street, about ten times during the year worked there I had to call police because they would not stop fighting in the hotel with other guests. They also are the most active consumers of prostitution services, I mean some of them were doing it three time a night, I know it because all visitors have to register in reception before they can proceed to the guest rooms. Overall on a scale 1-10 British cultural level from my personal experience is 1 and a halve.

  21. Name says:

    This did happen in Riga, Latvia. Some crazy drunk guy just started to hit cars windows in large parking. Also, who had doubt – Latvia is a part of EU… well, it`s hard to believe, but it is so.

  22. Сослан says:

    Сумасшедшие обстоятельства.

  23. 李钦 says:

    anyone here can speak chinese?谁会说中文?

    • Kilroy Was Here says:

      Why? Apparently China’s many different ethnic groups speak many different languages, collectively called Zhōngguó Yǔwén (中国语文), literally “speech and writing of China” which mainly span six linguistic families. Most of them are dissimilar morphologically and phonetically and are mutually unintelligible. Zhongguo Yuwen includes the many different Han Chinese language variants (commonly simply called Chinese) as well as non-Han minority languages such as Mongolian, Tibetan, Uyghur and Zhuang.

      Chinese language policy in mainland China is heavily influenced by Soviet nationalities policy and officially encourages the development of standard spoken and written languages for each of the nationalities of China. However, in this schema, Han Chinese are considered a single nationality, and official policy of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) treats the different varieties of the Chinese spoken language differently from the different national languages. For example, while official policies in mainland China encourage the development and use of different orthographies for the national languages and their use in educational and academic settings, the same is not true for the different Chinese spoken languages, despite the fact that they are more different from each other than, for example, the Romance languages of Europe.

      Putonghua or Standard Mandarin is the official national spoken language (except in Hong Kong and Macau), although autonomous regions and special administrative regions have additional official languages. For example, Tibetan has official status within the Tibet Autonomous Region and Mongolian has official status within the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region.

      Unofficially, there are large economic, social and practical incentives to be functional in Putonghua, a standardised form of the Mandarin group of dialects spoken in northern and southwestern China, which serves as a lingua franca among the different groups within mainland China. In addition, it is also considered increasingly prestigious and useful to have some ability in English, which is a required subject for persons attending university. During the 1950s and 1960s, Russian had some social status among elites in mainland China as the international language of socialism.

      The Economist, issue April 12, 2006 reported that up to one fifth of the population is learning English. Gordon Brown, the British Prime Minister, estimated that the total English-speaking population in China will outnumber the native speakers in the rest of the world in two decades.

      The spoken languages of nationalities that are a part of the People’s Republic of China belong to at least seven families:

      The Sino-Tibetan family: 28 nationalities (including the Han, Tibetans, Miao (Hmong), and Yao)
      The Altaic family: 17 (including the Uyghurs, Mongols, and Manchu)
      The Austroasiatic family: 4 (the De’ang, Blang, Gin (Vietnamese), and Wa)
      The Kradai family: several languages spoken by the Zhuang, the Buyei, the Dai people, the Dong people, and the Hlai (Li people).
      The Indo-European family: 2 (the Russians and Tajiks)
      The Austronesian family: 1 official nationality (the Gaoshan, who speak many languages), 1 unofficial (the Utsuls, who speak the Tsat language but are considered Hui.)
      Language isolate: 1 (the Koreans)

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