56 The Transportation

The Transportation

Posted on December 14, 2007 by

russian cars 1

One Russian blogger has spotted an interesting way of transporting a car from one place to another..

russian cars 2

via stilavinsergei


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56 Responses to “The Transportation”

  1. Niels R. says:


  2. Toby Esterhase says:

    I guess this isn’t too surprising given all the other dangerous cars we’ve seen posted to this site. It looks like at least this person attempted to try and secure the car. If you look very carefully at the second image, you can see some type of cable attached to the right-side of the bumper and going down. However I highly doubt this would prevent the car from falling out, heh.

    • Visitor says:

      “Im surprised the truck has all of its wheels (for now).”

      That’s hilarious, in light of the interesting thread about the truck in Ukraine (Belgium/Russia/wherever). :)

  3. snuggles says:

    I agree.

  4. Richard S. says:

    Looks like a 10 lane freeway. Is this the outer Moscow Ring Road? If not what road is this? Are there any roads in Russia that rival the 401 in Ontario?

  5. Drunk commie leader says:

    Why Russia kick UK out of country

    Damn commie Putin!

  6. where is @ says:

    Why I not see this in Mexico_

  7. Sceptical says:

    That’s the nicest looking road we’ve seen on this site. Are you sure it’s Russian?

    • Believe me says:

      Yes, it is in Russia. It was built with foreign aid–a grant from the British Council. Now the British Council have refused to staff toll booths on the highway to raise money for the Kremlin vodka fund.

      In retaliation, the Russian government is forcing the BC to close their offices in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Ekaterinburg, where British workers secretly compile databases of all the most fertile Russian women to be brides for sheep farmers in the English countryside, since the English women have all ran away on permanent holiday to the Middle East.

      • Randy Shakleford says:

        If I may elaborate on this matter,the English sheep farmers(being that they have so many sheep)have no interest in women other than to get dressed up like them,and yet they trade English sheep for fertile Russian women.We all know the fate of the sheep that are sent to Russia as we have seen in photos provided to us by Texas1.In the picture,believe me,that is a Russian man and an English breed of sheep. The Russian women we believe are being sold into prostitution-slavery. And who,you ask,is the mastermind in this “Russian brides for English sheep brides”illegal trading ring? The name Boris A. is heard often,who is Russian and lives in UK. How convenient it must be to indulge in such bombastic trading practices. We of “The Council to Stop Bombastic Trade Practices”ask you,Boris, in a nice way to stop the bombastic trade practices.Already “PETA” is on their way to rescue the sheep but they have no one among them who can read a map so you will have some time to change your misguided ways.Do it,Boris.Do it for the poor sheep and your mental health. You will feel better knowing you did the right thing.

        • Believe me says:

          Thanks, Randy, for elaborating. I’ve often wondered who was the mastermind behind these sheep-for-women illegal smuggling operations.

        • Boris Abramov says:

          Currently there is an increasing demand from Texas, so I was thinking of diverting my supplies anyhow.

          With regards to PETA, they are still busy investigating the alleged animal cruelty case which occurred in the Buckingham palace where one of queen’s favorite sheep was sexually abused during the state visit of President George W. Bush. The eyewitness describe the perpotrator of this horrendous crimes as a middle-aged, tall, gray haired man, wearing a dark blue suit with an “american flag badge” on the left side of his jacket. PETA together with the British police are having difficulty identifying the perpetrator so the investigation is still pending..

          • Visitor says:

            “The eyewitness describe the perpotrator of this horrendous crimes as a middle-aged, tall, gray haired man, wearing a dark blue suit with an american flag badge on the left side of his jacket.”

            OMG . . . Tony Blair?!! :)

    • Zafarad says:

      What a nice jock?ha ha ha ha,shopkeeper and middleman traders what are you thinking about Russia?if you are young,ask your grand pa or father,what was the Soviet union and his industrial,economic,military and political power! ! ! ! ! !.and now new Russia is emerging from his bad days.get ready for all so called “European unions”.Russia is now able to halt your all industrial and economic boom by “turning off some Gas valves”.ha ha ha……….

      • snuggles says:

        jock ?

        • John from Kansas says:


        • Zafarad says:

          Ha ha ha ha! ! ! ! ! ! !

        • Zafarad says:

          I think something is burning! ! ! ! !what is that i don`t know,but “opinions are like fashions,beautiful when new,ugly when discarded”.

        • Boris Abramov says:

          Beaver, slightly off topic, but what do you think behind the idea of Russia and Israel being the potential future candidates for the EU membership?

          If I remember correctly, this idea was endorsed by such prominent public figures as Silvio Berlusconi, Gerhard schroder and even such an eccentric figure as Vladimir Zhirinovsky, who I am sure you Estonians love ;)

          …no, but seriously??

          • talking beaver says:

            Hi there, my maniac friend Boris!

            Yes, I would believe that there is a certain chance for Israel to join EU in future, because, although clearly it is not in Europe, it is definitely a country of a Western cultural world. Much more so than Turkey. Though their problems with Palestinians make it practically less likely.

            Whereas Russia as a member of EU is a pure fantasy. Just like Russia being a NATO member. Zero chance. Especially after all the anti-Western cries and threats coming from Russia lately. Forget it!

            If they (Russians) would have continued the course of reforms started by Gorbachev and Yeltsin – then yes! Then in course of decades, or even sooner, Russia would have changed to become truly democratic country of Western type. Unfortunately nowdays they are heading away in entirely different, yet not clearly identified direction. Heil to the Empire! As one popular character put it (“12 chairs”) – “We are passing by each other like ships at the sea”.

            I just wonder why you mention these “prominent figures” as they include an extravagant politician accused for links to mafia, a politician making decisions suspiciously beneficial to the Russian company where he is on payroll now, publishing books supporting the regime of his present day master (shame to Germans! one could call such a “prominent figure” a “political prostitute”, but might also omit “political”), as well as politician who is generally regarded more like a clown than a politician at all (I mean Zhirik, of course).

            I just wonder if you do seriously consider that their “endorsement” is of any serious importance in modern Europe.

            By the way I like Zhirik (Mr. Zhirinovsky). I like his attitude and his style. His speeches are full of fiery crazed vividness and hidden twisted humor. He would be good comedian and could run his own TV show. Respect. ;)

            And, again, one thousand and first time I shall remind you that I am not an Estonian. But I am sure it will not penetrate the crust around your brain anyway…

            • Boris Abramov says:

              Hi beaver, nice to see you too.

              Ok, I confess; initially I decided to ask you this question not so much because I wanted to hear your opinion, but because your comments, if not racist or offensive, are normally rather entertaining and never fail to make me laugh. And this comment was certainly beyond any of my expectations :) Thank you.

              I must say, it is rather nice to be making some sort of dialogue with you. It certainly makes a change from all the racist rants that you deliver in response to my comments. But anyway, I digress

              I agree with you, I am rather sceptical at the prospect of Russia ever joining the EU. I certainly cannot even comprehend this happening while Putin has an sort of powerbase in the Kremlin. Of course whether Medvedev is in charge or not, wouldnt make any difference what-so-ever because Putin would be calling all the shots anyhow. The concept itself though seem rather interesting to me, not least, because of the reactions it produced when I introduced it to other people.

              From my observations and conversations with people, I have noticed that some people, when faced with the prospect of Russia joining the EU, would fear Russia taking over and calling all the shots within the union as one the most dominant States within the EU. Others, however, fear that if the union were to accept Russia, as a legitimate member, its sovereignty would be compromised because of the US influence throughout the union. By that I think they were also referring primarily to its resources being taken away and used only to benefit other US-friendly states. Anyhow, I thought it was a rather interesting, if not realistic, topic for discussion that would certainly generate some rather interesting debates. And agin, it most certainly did.

              If they (Russians) would have continued the course of reforms started by Gorbachev and Yeltsin – then yes!

              Again, I have to agree with at least half of your statement. If Gorbachev was to complete his course of reforms, I think Russia would have its current economic success by mid 90 + it would most probably be more democratic. In relation to this particular issue I would like to post you a link of a Garbachev interview which I have added to Forum section recently. In this short interview, Gorbachev manages to touch upon some very important issues of todays world. This includes – democracy in Russia, Putin, US imperialism, press freedom etc. I would very much like you to watch it and then, if you like, give me some feedback on it. This time I am very much interested in hearing your opinion :)

              Here it is:

              Beaver, in some ways I also enjoy listening to Zhirinovskys rants, watching his fights, and reading his famous quotes. He is certainly a funny guy, a xenophobe, racist, but nevertheless a funny guy. I also think that he is much cleverer then most people would ever give him credit for. He is a true performer, a professional clown, but most certainly not a politician. In fact I sure, that the support he gets has nothing to do with his political views.

              Beaver, again, it was very good to have a normal dialogue with you, without you resorting to personal attacks or racist, anti-Semitic or otherwise, rants. Lets just hope that your old habits will not return soon.



              • maxD says:

                I checked the interview and I can’t see anything remarkable about it. Being a politician, G. is unbeatable when it comes to using a lot of words to say almost nothing. The interview was a year old so G. might have changed his opinion a bit since then: democracy is less than ever before, and still declining, the cold war seems to start up again, Putin’s personality cult is derailing, etc. I have respect for G., he is indeed not a weakling and led Russia out of misery, opened the door to new prospects but again, it takes a bit of education and a certain frame of reference to really see this. The average Russian is more susceptible to macho short term politics, like Putin, and therefore G. has no chance to ever get back in parliament.

                Zhirinovsky is indeed a good example of how the average people are prone to be seduced by the packaging and overlooking the content. He is a performer, has charisma, but should not be in politics: he is potentionally dangerous IMO.

                • talking beaver says:

                  Regretfully I must join by saying that the era of democracy, successfully opened by Gorbachev, is about to be successfully closed by Putin.

                  I also had always admired the ability of Gorby to talk for hours and effectively say nothing. That requires a real talent.

                  As for Zhirinovsky – I remember people laughing at Hitler and calling him a clown. While this time I would consider the guy being called a clown more appropriate, still I would agree that in right conditions this person could be very dangerous. Not because he would be naturally evil or anything of that kind. Mostly because he is so irregular and creative. An artist. Remember – Hitler also was an artist, and rather good one at that. The guys like that make history.

                  I remember once Mr. Zhirinovsky suggested that Russia installs at the border with Latvia large fans which would blow radioactive waste over the border. Funny but rather twisted.

              • talking beaver says:

                Right, Boris!

                You also surprised me this time behaving almost like a sensible person for a change. That possibly could be something to do with the phases of the Moon, I guess. So I will skip all the funny insults which popped to my mind after reading your post.

                So let us both also hope that old habits of extremism, chauvinism, non-tolerance, cultivation of hatred and xenophobic, hypocritical, self-righteous, outright lying and falsification will not return to you.

                Merry Christmas!

      • Voldemar von Putting says:

        Operation “Russian Freedom” would be fun too.

  8. dungeonbrownies says:

    wanna be nightrider lolz

  9. Eblan says:

    Britain is SUCK !

    • Boris Abramov says:

      Your english is SUCK

      • Visitor says:

        :) Good one.

        • Boris Abramov says:

          I know that was pretty genius, wasn’t it..?

          Visitor, I was going to ask you this quite some time ago – how would you feel about joining the Forum? It’s just that a contribution from someone as informed and experienced as yourself would certainly be valuable + Texas1 really needs some support in convincing everyone that US is in fact the best country in the World :) Think about it…

          • Visitor says:

            Thanks. It sounds like fun. Although–I love politics, history, and the differences in culture so much that I am afraid I may spend too much time on the forum if I’m not careful. Still . . . the chance to aggravate John from Kansas every once in a while is too good to pass up. :)

            I’ll register on the forum soon.

  10. snuggles says:

    I agree !

  11. Rodriguez_66 says:

    You`re small circle funky monkeys. I wonder “how very much” you know about our GREAT country.
    Seating in your little european “free” and “democratic” countries and keeping quiet. i suggest it!

    • maxD says:

      who are you ? which great country ?

      • talking beaver says:

        As the person is so much obsessed with GREATness, I would presume he/she/it did mean Russia.

        • talking beaver says:

          .. +

          please pay attention to adjective “little”.
          please pay attention to irony in “free” and “democratic”, addressing European countries.

          this definitely is Russian, as each and every modern advanced Russian knows that Russia is GREAT, big (which is very important, ’cause everyone will agree that big heap of dung is much more important than small heap of dung), truly free and truly democratic. as opposed to all those pitiful non-free, non-democratic, non-GREAT and non-big “countries” of European Union.

          • maxD says:

            In general, psychology has pointed out people tend to emphasize those characteristics of which they are the most unsure – to compensate, so to speak.

            If someone calls me purple I will not even respond to it: I know I’m not purple. If I’m called weak or short or will remain indifferent: I know it makes no sense, it only points out the flawed ideas of the opponent, actually. So these very common reactions about how GREAT Russia is etc etc only underline the minority complex many Russians have.

            As for his statements, Russia is vast, indeed. As for great, well, that’s very subjective. Like I said before, step out of the frame to get the full picture, so, living in Russia will not make you the best judge of the country, you have no first hand comparison material.

            Thanks to Putin Russia is now more stable than it was and thanks to George Bush it is now more prosperous than it used to be.

            [Brief explanation : Bush invades Iraq – causing direct and indirect problems with oil deliveries, which makes the prices go sky high, which, since oil and gas are linked, makes the price of gas [russia's major resource] go sky high. Since GAZPROM is the biggest taxpayer in Russia they are generating the biggest stream of dollars which is beneficial for Russia as an economic power.]

    • Boris Abramov says:

      LOL “funky monkey” that’s funny :)

  12. Groundskeeper Willie says:

    here min, at’s ma car that went ofski last wik!! Theivin bastarts – must be weegies, ken.

  13. Visitor says:

    “eyewitness describe the perpotrator of this horrendous crimes as a middle-aged, tall, gray haired man, wearing a dark blue suit with an american flag badge on the left side of his jacket.”

    Tony Blair?! :)

  14. Check says:

    Time out!!

  15. Phil I. Buster says:

    ScienceDaily (May 22, 2007) — Psychiatric researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine will report important new findings from a study of patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia at the upcoming meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, to be held in San Diego May 17-20.
    See also:
    Health & Medicine

    * Mental Health Research
    * Today’s Healthcare

    Mind & Brain

    * Psychiatry
    * Bipolar Disorder

    Computers & Math

    * Information Technology
    * Artificial Intelligence


    * Delayed sleep phase syndrome
    * Neurology
    * Personality disorder
    * Psychosis

    The patented approach developed at UCSD, using a novel device called a “LifeShirt” – a computerized vest that continuously monitors the patient’s movements – shows that patterns of movements differ between patients with the two disorders. The device, manufactured by VivoMetrics©, monitors hyperactive and repetitive movements, and collects data on respiration, heart rate and other physiological measures.

    While wearing the vest, subjects’ movements were also recorded by a camera embedded in the ceiling, and the film of their exploratory behavior converted into movement patterns that characterize the manic phase of the disorder. Patients with bipolar disease exhibited hyperactivity and a wide range of exploration when in a novel environment, according to the researchers. Schizophrenic patients, on the other hand, exhibited much more restricted movements.

    “When patients are highly symptomatic, it is sometimes difficult for physicians to diagnose whether an individual is exhibiting signs of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder,” said William Perry, Ph.D., UC San Diego professor of psychiatry, who is leading a five-year study of bipolar disorder funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health. “In our first report from the study, we find that patients in the two groups show different patterns of exploration in new environments.”

    The “behavioral pattern monitor” research in patients is based upon parallel studies with rats and mice, conducted by co-investigators Mark Geyer, Ph.D., and Martin Paulus, M.D., both UC San Diego professors of psychiatry. When rodents are given drugs such as amphetamines, or have genetic abnormalities that change brain chemistry, they exhibit distinctive, abnormal movement patterns and difficulties in filtering information. The medications that are used to treat bipolar disorder normalize these behaviors and thoughts.

    “The LifeShirt and our analyses of their exploratory movements allow us to take precise measurements while the person moves freely,” said Perry. “It offers a promising approach to helping us learn about the underlying function of patients with bipolar disorder.”

    The researchers will also report on how bipolar patients screen out or filter unimportant information from the environment. According to Perry, patients with bipolar disorder have difficulty screening excessive or unimportant information, which may lead to the inappropriate behaviors that is seen during their manic episodes. During such episodes, patients display an exaggerated sense of their abilities, speak extremely fast and exhibit excessive motor movements. These behaviors are thought to result from impairments in brain systems that regulate behavior.

    Perry and his colleagues hope that, by studying the brain’s screening or filtering mechanisms in manic patients before and after they are treated with medication, they will be able to compare their results to those that have been collected in mice. If so, they believe the mice can be used to discover new and improved drugs by observing how their movement pattern is altered after taking medication. The collective findings might also offer insight into the chemical imbalances and genetic abnormalities that appear to contribute to bipolar disorder.

    Adapted from materials provided by University of California, San Diego.

  16. too muchvodka says:


  17. snuggles says:

    I agree….

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