125 New GAZ “Volga”

New GAZ “Volga”

Posted on August 29, 2007 by


new volga gaz car 1

This is Chrysler Sebring, an American car from late 90s. And on the pictures below the new Russian GAZ "Volga" car which is going to be on Russian market from the next year:

Advertisement


new volga gaz car 2

new volga gaz car 3

They admit that this new Volga is based on a Chrysler car. The expected price is $18,000.

photos via carclub.ru


Across the network:

loading...

Advertisement


More from our network:

125 Responses to “New GAZ “Volga””

  1. Marky says:

    Where would Russian companies be without American R+D? ;-)

    • zafarad says:

      This is just myth.I agree with maxD,today every mainstream car is almost identical to others someway.no individual personality is differ from the other car.aerodynamic design gave every car to limited chance to create something absolute different machine.and you all aware of this news that German car companies are try to take some legal action against the Chinese car manufacturing firms.because of German `THINK`Chinese are copying their models and even they wish to sell in Germany! ! ! ! !.but this is very serious matter.Chinese are able to develop their very own designs just after few YEARS.they already invest huge amount for local R&D.

    • just... says:

      Where would American R+D be without brain drain from all over the globe including Russia: Zvorykin (TV, electron microscope), Sikorsky (helicopters) – just to mention these two.

      • just... says:

        It’s not about reasons they left, it’s about their role in America and wider. On these points you agree as I see.

        By the way ‘widely known in narrow circles’ — it’s about you isn’t it?

      • Boris Abramov says:

        I could not agree more! And those of you who consider intellect outflow to be the problem of just the 90s, are frankly deluded ignorant individuals.

      • D says:

        Ford and GM are in trouble and everyone knows it. They still make good cars, but how much longer can they lose money?

        • Texas1 says:

          They’ve got things under control. They were bleeding because of all of the union entitlements. The unions have finally conceded and there is opportunity at Ford & GM again. 10-15 years ago, you could go down on an assembly line and find a high school dropout making $100,000 a year. It’s not that way anymore.

        • D says:

          Trouble is in the economy. Unions just help the workes stay covered with health care and to receive fair benefits. GM is not selling cars like the japanese are in america, so they cannot afford to pay their workers, health care is the biggest issue, its not a GM issue, its a U.S. issue.

          • D says:

            So then who’s job is it to provide health care? Is it the individuals responsiblity to pay for health costs? In this way insurance companies will run the world, and everything will depend on whether you are covered or not, and they have the power to deny any claim based on any reason. Not the way I want my world controlled by some guy in a cubicle telling me to opt for the cheaper but more risky surgery just becase it will be covered by my plan. Insurance companies will become the new government. No thanks.

            No, I dont have a first hand experience with universal health care, but it cant be worse than paying $200 a month for my health care (which is cheap btw), only to find out that money is being used to treat illegal mexicans who are draining our already strained health services.

            In PA we have CHIP, a program that covers every child who is not already covered. Seems to work great. Why cant we expand this to everyone? Raise my taxes, i dont care, theres no way you need $200 a month from me.

        • John from Kansas says:

          Dream on little facist.

      • Spanish says:

        YESSS!!!!and…Where would Americans R+D be without the german V2 rockets??juuuuuu

    • crash says:

      so TRUE, english for the concorde attempt, american for our space shuttle and many others

    • Doug says:

      That may have been somewhat true two or three decades ago, but my 1990 model Olds is still going strong.

    • David says:

      they didn’t unload it. Diamler-Benz sold Chrysler to Cerberus, a private company. and, no, it’s not a part of dodge. and neither was plymouth. they’re all owned by parent, chrysler.

    • John from Kansas says:

      The alleged superiority of Japanese automobiles is a myth.

    • sterwa says:

      If the word “liberty ” doesnt exist in russian , then “tasteful” is certainly missing in american english

    • jake03446 says:

      I own a Sebring and its a great car. However, the Russians did a great job cleaning up the design. kudos to GAZ.

  2. Dave says:

    Same place where the US would be without Russian oil and gas?

    • I_am_wrong says:

      You are correct. The US only imports 1.5%ish (300 thousand barrel/day from the Russia)

      Yes I can use my right mouse button.

    • Texas1 says:

      And in 15-20 years it won’t matter because alternative fuels and electric vehicles will be more favorable, less expensive and more economical. GM is on the forefront with the new technology.

      • Not to be skeptical, but where does GM have a practical hybrid or electric car?

        Honda has done some interesting work in hydrogen/fuel cell cars; I like their brillant idea of a natural gas to hydrogen converter for home fill ups.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_FCX
        http://www.usatoday.com/money/autos/2007-05-10-honda-fuel-cell_N.htm

        • D says:

          I drive by there all the time.

        • D says:

          Hydrogen is very practical and the research being done on it in the past few years has matured a lot. Its just a matter of time, but hydrogen is def the future. No need for fusion to create hydrogen. Its already being done by solar power. It can be stored in aluminum with a high density and refilled and extracted to and from aluminum with ease. Already being worked on. Everyday there is a breakthrough in this area.

          Flex fuel is just temporary.

        • Texas1 says:

          They will be releasing a new one shortly that gets more mileage on its electric cell and will be considerably less expensive.

        • D says:

          Is Russia part of OPEC? Russia is OPEC’s main competitor and if OPEC raised its prices, Russia would be moving in on its revenue. Thats what their scared of. America is scared of the turmoil in the mid east, which would force it to buy its oil from one of its other enemies. (Russia, South America), feeding economies even more hungry for military might. Thats what america is scared of, having an economy controlled by other world powers instead of the gullible and greedy middle east kings who are just puppets of america. Russia is not scared because even with all the research being done in alternative energy sources, most power will still come from some form of natural resource, which russia controls alot of. The only real threat to oil and gas economy is solar power, which is still 50 years from being a viable option, even then to produce solar panels will take factories run on… you guessed it natural resources. (coal, oil, uranium, natural gas). We run off of the power of the earth and sun, there is no way around it.

          • D says:

            Theres alot of speculation in your theory. I proposed something thats already occuring, you propose something thats never happened (peace in the middle east? not anytime soon) (reduction in demand?, just the opposite). I agree they are all out to make a quick buck, but 2008 will only bring new faces, not a new policy. And I dont know how much more reasearch into alternative fuels we can do, weve been doing it since at least 2001, and we’re still a long way away from a replacement for oil. It will be easier to pump from siberia than replace a whole economy built on oil. Think about infrastructure (gas statioins, pipe lines, delivery methods, power generators, refinaries) would all have to be replaced. Not as cheap as pumping more blood from the earth in siberia.

            • D says:

              From all the research I have read on biofuels, they are just not feasable. Think of all the farming needed to create that biomass. Think of the biomass to energy ratio. It would take an unbelievable amout of biomass to generate the same energy as a barrell of oil. Plus all the energy and time and space and money required in growing, fermenting, and all the other hoops you jump through, you end up with a net energy of not worth it. I forgot who said it but some major sceintist just recently said something like, “all the farm land in the world could not produce enough biomass to replace oil”. Unless there is some major breakthrough on the horizon, but it doesnt look promising.

              • D says:

                We can sit here and argue back and forth about crop yields and what not, but the fact still stands….where is it? I see biodeisel and its being used more and thats good, but its not even close to reducing oil consumption. Its been around for years now. Willie Nelson is selling it for gods sake. So then why are we still using diesel? The only reason is there is not enough of it and its more expensive to make. The only reason people are even switching is to be enviromentally friendly with exhaust. There is no clear answer, we’ll just have to wait and see.

                • D says:

                  I understand your logic, but thats not how it works. If there is increased demand for biofuels, the price of biofuels goes up unless production can meet demand, and it cant. Not enough resources for biofuels to replace all of our energy needs. It would take a billion willie nelson’s, and frankly we dont have room for them.

                  • D says:

                    http://www.physorg.com/news107704940.html

                    I like the part that says “The simulations found the farm that harvested the most stover also needed the most fertilizer, had the most erosion and barely returned sustainable levels of organic matter to the soil. That farm also recorded the highest net farm income before taxes.”

                    But he wouldnt be able to do it next year. Unsustainable at this point. Its just not feasable as I said without some kind of major breakthrough.

                    This is just one I’ve seen in the past hour. I read these all the time.

          • D says:

            Fusion is at least 100 years away. Minus the plant they are building in France, which is still only to test the waters.

            • D says:

              Reserves are just that, reserves, they will tap them only in emergency, even then its only enough to sustain for a relativly short time.

              50 years is a generous time frame. It will take something like 10-15 just to build the pilot plant. Did they even start it yet?

              • D says:

                ok, I was thinking of the “strategic oil reserves” barrells hidden in mountains in case of a war.

                Even then with all oil reserves, the best estimates are around 100 years worth, if it was all recoverable this instant, which it isnt. So, if america got cut off of oil right now, we would only last a few months to a year.

                The fusion plant being built in france is a joint effort by almost every industrialized country (Mostly Russia, Japan, EU, USA, and China) Actually, China is very proficient in fusion reactors and have already built one of their own. Billions of dollars and years and years until it powers its first light bulb.

            • John from Kansas says:

              (…or Meim Kampf…)

  3. D says:

    I have a 95 Sebring. Great car. That looks more like the newer dodge stratus though.

    • Texas1 says:

      Does it have the Mitsubishi engine?

      • D says:

        It’s one of the first models. The 2.4L. They only made a few of those then started with the 2.5L. The galant, stratus, eclipse, sebring, and eagle talons all share the same frame, they are basically the same car with different shells. All borrowed from a japanese design originally intended for the eclipse, but it was so successful that american companies bought the frame and expanded on it. The only problem with 93-97 was the transmissions, most fail at about 70,000 miles. I went through two already and I’m about to replace a transmission in a 96 galant that I have so that my nephew has a car to drive when he gets his license next month. Probably too much info, but you get me started on cars, and I cant stop.

    • D says:

      I’d rather hit a curb in an american car than a japanese car. Jap cars are death traps. American cars are safe. I hate jap cars, everytime I sit in a honda, I feel like I’m a jap in tokyo. German cars are my favorite.

      BTW, I have two accords for sale if anyone is interested. A 96 v4 with 119,000 miles ($4500). and a 95 v6 with 67,000 leather seats and sunroof ($7500). And a 99 Buick Park Avenue with 90,000 ($7000). All automatic. I’m in PA. Let me know, I’ll point you to the link.

  4. dr.henry wu says:

    vhatever sputknock, judging by the backseats dhey both look like the car your seester slept in last night, and you was driving?

  5. Richard S. says:

    it is better if the Russians would build a German engineered and designed car.

  6. Boris Abramov says:

    Well 18K is certainly cheap, so it does have the potential to take off. However, I would like to see the interior and specs.

  7. Boris Abramov says:

    What a despicable language you are using, bastrad, There are young children on this site. You should be ashamed of yourself!

  8. A.W. says:

    Folks, ease down a little bit! Why are you all making such a ruckus?

    After all, every continent “steals” from on another. In reality, there is a large licensing business going on and you simply do not see it.

    Here are some examples:

    – U.S. companies like Saturn and Chevrolet now import cars made in Europe. The Saturn Astra is made in Antwerp, Belgium for example.
    – Korean companies like Ssanyong import Mercedes engines from Germany.
    – Many U.S. and European cars are manufactured in the Czech republic, due to low wages and highly trained specialized workers.

    Conclusion: this stuff happens all the time. Don’t have a cow, it’s globalization.

    • M0L0TOV says:

      Actually, Ssangyong builds their engines under license from Mercedes Benz and they also produce a variant on an older Mercedes E-Class called the Chairman. You are correct about the licensing. GAZ bought the tooling from the factory in Sterling Heights Michigan and had it shipped to Russia. There’s no copying at all whatsoever. As part of the deal, Chrysler will provide the vehicle with the 2.4 liter 4 cylinder engines for the vehicle (the older 2.4, not the new Phoenix family of engines).

    • zafarad says:

      So why you afraid of Chinese invasion of `globalization`?today China make every thing from reverse engineering.even they made space craft from 70s soviet space module.at one stage we can`t predict what is original design and what is not.look Japanese and Korean cars they are almost same in appearance and performance.at one time Korea has same position as todays China.but Koreans successfully won this race of survival.i hope Chinese shall won their own…………..

  9. zafarad says:

    Please MR,Cynical BASTERD sir,this site is for whom who bears good moral and character.please show your good side.thank you.BASTERD………….

  10. Boris Abramov says:

    Funny :) But not my comment :(

  11. Justin says:

    Any more info on this car?

  12. Texas1 says:

    I agree with cynical.

    For that price you can buy a brand new Toyota Camry LE or a Nissan Altima. Both will have a higher resale, provide a more comfortable ride, have an established dealer network and be more efficient.

  13. Richard S. says:

    Are there any Saturns in Russia such as the Ion or the Vue? In my opinion, I find them the most reliable of North American cars.It is too bad that they are getting away from the polymar bodies and replacing them with metal bodies. One thing about the Saturn cars with these polymar bodies is they do not rust! I hate cars that rust!

  14. Doug says:

    I have driven one of those – the Dodge Stratus/Chrysler Sebring. I drove it for several hundred miles. A very good choice to keep in production.

  15. D says:

    A new sebring goes for about $30,000

  16. D says:

    Cars are not proprietary any more.

    Car companies buy parts and frames, engines, whole cars off of other companies and rebrand them into their own. Each major company has about 3 or four standard frames that all of their cars are built on. And variations on engines and interiors and body is the only thing that differetiates the models. So its perfectaly normal to see a car almost exaclty the same as another model, it doesnt mean that its a ripoff, there is probably some kind of licensing deal going on. Especially with exports. There is usually a domestic model, and then a variation, possibly with a totally different name, to export, even with a rival company.

  17. Dima says:

    GAZ, the country’s second-largest automotive firm, said Friday that it planned to invest a total of $150 million over the next two years in two new cars, based on older-generation Chrysler models.

    The company, which is best known for its Volga sedan, will buy licenses and equipment to produce Chrysler Sebring and Dodge Stratus sedans under its own brand in Russia, GAZ said.

    The investment comes weeks after GAZ said it would invest up to $250 million annually over the next five years to develop new models and train its work force.

    It declined on Friday to say how much of the $150 million investment would be paid to Chrysler, which is now working on new versions of both the Sebring and Stratus models.

    Under the deal, GAZ, which is part of billionaire Oleg Deripaska’s empire, will transfer older manufacturing equipment from Chrysler’s Sterling Heights, Michigan, plant to Nizhny Novgorod, where the Volga is made.

    GAZ also plans to buy engines from Chrysler’s engine plant in Saltillo, Mexico, GAZ said in a statement.

    The first cars based on the Chrysler technology are expected to roll off the production line at the end of 2007 or in early 2008, Erik Eberhardson, vice president and chief strategy officer at GAZ, said by telephone Friday.

    GAZ plans to initially produce 65,000 cars per year, said Eberhardson, adding that output could be increased if necessary.

    “The models will be restyled and adapted to Russian roads,” Eberhardson said. The company has not yet decided what the new models will be called, he said.

    The starting price for both models will be around $17,000, he added. The starting price for the Sebring models that DaimlerChrysler now sells in Russia is close to $24,000.

    GAZ, whose line of automobiles is primarily composed of light commercial vehicles and buses, decided against developing its own models from scratch due to the high costs involved, up to $1 billion per model, Eberhardson said.

    The move by GAZ makes AvtoVAZ the only domestic automotive company trying to keep afloat with its own model range. AvtoVAZ, which makes the Lada, has said it plans to develop up to 12 new models over the next five years.

    “Americans will have a hard time taking root in the Russian market,” said Kirill Chuiko, a UralSib automotive analyst who estimated that no more than 20,000 to 30,000 Chrysler cars sold under the GAZ name would sell in Russia each year.

    Gairat Salimov, a car analyst with Troika Dialog, said the deal would add value to the company. D-class models like the Sebring and Stratus belong to “one of the highest-growing segments in Russia,” he said.

    Chrysler is part of DaimlerChrysler, which has expressed interest in building its own plant in Russia. The newer version of the Sebring will be introduced in Russia by the year’s end, said Yelena Divakova, a spokeswoman for DaimlerChrysler in Russia.

    • D says:

      Its about time. I have faith in Russian engineering. We have to start somewhere. Better to copy what already works and build on top of that.

      • D says:

        All those cars you mentioned are junk. A chrysler sebring is a late model standard family sized american sedan. totally different from any other copies. Plus the major components are still made by chrysler.

    • spence says:

      Would anyone know the fate of the GAZ diesel engine plant that was supposed to be built in the eighties as part of a major expansion?

  18. Sam says:

    Back to the car: yes, it’s a Chrysler Sebring. The whole manufacturing works were bought a shipped to Russia.

    And TV was invented by an American, Philo T. Farnsworth.

  19. Dan says:

    That’s not a GAZ Volga. I visited the GAZ website and found out this car is not really a “Volga”. The car’s name (based on the site)is “GAZ Siber” (or Syber). It’s probably the latest model made by GAZ.

  20. Lalo says:

    Well, I read at a DaimlerChrysler News(Before Daimler solds Chrysler) that they sold all rights of the Stratus/Cirrus/Sebring to the Russian company, that’s why is identycal to the Chysler/Dodge car, the engine will be the same 2.4 liter with 150hp, engine tha will be produced and exported by Chrysler Motor Plant at Saltillo, Mxico.

  21. Vasya says:

    Well, nice Russian Dodge Intrepid.. ))

  22. anthony says:

    It looks like VOLKSWAGEN was benchmarked with its current JETTA A5 sedan.
    Hope the interior will be as good.
    Compliment to VW this time around.

  23. Mister Twister, former minister says:

    This line of cars with front wheel drive will do well in Russian cities. They do very well in Minnesota which is very similar to Russia in terms of weather.

  24. missssobieski says:

    Интернет-конкурс «Miss Sobieski»

    Проголосуйте. плиз за мою девчонку на конкурсе miss sobieski, вот по этой ссылке http://www.miss-sobieski.com/miss/624/

  25. Anna Allen says:

    Hydrogen Fuel is very promising, i only hope that we can mass produce soon enough.,*.

  26. Linerkoo says:

    Народ ) накидайте ссылок на хорошие онлайн-радиостанции плиз ;)
    Я вот нашел один сайтик …
    он мне очень понравился – Онлайн-Радио Заслушаем
    там прям и пообщаться можно по интересам и свой плейлист составить и в хит-парадах поучаствовать

    но хочется еще разнообразия )))

    заранее спасибо ;)

  27. Vladimir says:

    Russian cars are horrible.
    Reliability: 1/10 (1 point for cheap maintenance)
    Design: 3/10 (a decade behind)
    Features: 2/10 (no comment)

    I would rather get a chevy than a russian car. Nothing beats the german and the british tho.

  28. Tilly Holmes says:

    hydrogen fueled vehicles are the best but they are still not widely available.**,

  29. Michael 1963 says:

    From Italy .
    Le automobili russe sono ancora velate di un alone misterioso, almeno per noi italiani, che conosciaamo solo le Lada, soprattutto per la Niva e la 124 ex Fiat. Io credo che nei prossimi anni si evolveranno in modo notevole.

Leave a Reply

  • Popular: